Current Social Science Research Report--Social #7, March 20, 2007.

CSSRR-Social is a weekly email report produced by the Data and Information Services Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It seeks to help social science researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/cssrindex.html

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CSSRR-Social is compiled and edited by Jack Solock and Charlie Fiss.

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To CSSRR-Econ #7

To CSSRR- Health #7

CSSRR-Index

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Index to this issue:

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT AND NGO STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

US

US STATES

NGO AND OTHER COUNTRIES

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

WORKING PAPERS

TABLES OF CONTENTS

CONFERENCES

LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES

DATA

WEBSITES OF INTEREST

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL AND NGO PUBLICATIONS

US:

1. Census Bureau Report, Facts for Features:

A. "Educational Attainment in the United States: 2006" (detailed tables from the 2006 Current Population Survey, Microsoft Excel and comma separated value [.csv] format). The report is linked to from a Census Bureau news release: "Earnings Gap Highlighted by Census Bureau Data on Educational Attainment" (CB07-40, Mar. 15, 2007).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/education/009749.html

Click on title of report for link to tables.

B. Facts for Features: "Mother's Day: May 13, 2007 (CB07-FF.07, HTML and .pdf format, 4p.).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/index.html

See under Mar. 14, 2007 listing.

2. Department of Housing and Urban Development Periodical: U.S. Housing Market Conditions (4th Quarter 2006, March 2007, .pdf format).

http://www.huduser.org/periodicals/ushmc/winter06/ushmc_Q406.html

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US States:

Vermont:

State Data Center for Rural Studies Report: "Census 2000 Vermont Worker Flow Data" Update: The SDC has added worker flow data by Residence Town to this report. This data is available in ASCII text (uncompressed and .zip compressed) and Microsoft Excel format.

http://crs.uvm.edu/census/worker_flow/

Washington:

Office of Financial Management Research Brief: "Perceptions of Neighborhood Crime: 2006," by Erica Gardner (Brief No. 45, March 2007, .pdf format, 5p.).

http://www.ofm.wa.gov/researchbriefs/brief045.pdf

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NGO and Other Countries

United Nations:

Population Division: World Population Prospects: "The results of the 2006 Revision -- which provide the population basis for the assessment of trends at the global, regional and national levels, and serve as input for calculating many key indicators in the United Nations system -- incorporate the findings of the most recent national population censuses and of the numerous specialized population surveys carried out around the world." The "Summary Tables" section is comprised of a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. The "Highlights" and "Fact Sheets" on population aging are in .pdf format. The "Data online" section links to a web based data extractor that provides data in HTML and comma separated value (.csv) format.

http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wpp2006/wpp2006.htm

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European Commission:

Eurostat Periodicals: Statistics in Focus. Issue No 35, 2007 (March 2007, .pdf format, 8p.). The focus of this issue is "R&D in higher education and government."

http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/portal/page?_pageid=1073,46587259&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL&p_product_code=KS-SF-07-035

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Belarus:

Ministry of Statistics and Analysis Compendium: The Republic of Belarus in figures 1990-2006 (HTML format).

http://belstat.gov.by/homep/en/indicators/main1.php

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Denmark:

Statistics Denmark Statbank Denmark Updates:

A. "BIO1: Danish cinemas, cinema screens and seating capacity by type and type of cinema"

http://www.statbank.dk/BIO1

B. "BIO2: Activity in Danish cinemas by activity and nationality"

http://www.statbank.dk/BIO2

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States of Jersey Compendium: Jersey In Figures, 2006 (March 2007, .pdf format, 83p.).

http://www.gov.je/Statistics/NewsReleases/JerseyInFigures2006.htm

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Netherlands:

Statistics Netherlands Web Magazine Article: "More than one third of adults received care allowance," by Hans Kasperski and Peter Meuwissen (Mar. 13, 2007).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/arbeid-sociale-zekerheid/publicaties/artikelen/archief/2007/2007-2135-wm.htm

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Northern Ireland:

Statistics and Research Agency Press Release: "2006 Births Press Release" (Mar. 15, 2007, .pdf format, 9p.).

http://www.nisra.gov.uk/archive/demography/publications/births_deaths/births_2006.pdf

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Norway:

Statistics Norway News Releases:

A. "Children in kindergartens. Preliminary figures, 2006: 11,500 more children in kindergarten" (Mar 15, 2007). The news release links to four topical tables.

http://www.ssb.no/english/subjects/04/02/10/barnehager_en/

B. "Population statistics. Population changes in the municipalities, 1951-2007: Growth or decline in your municipality?" (Mar. 15, 2007).

http://www.ssb.no/english/subjects/02/02/folkendrhist_en/

C. "Imprisonment, 2005: Increasing prison population" (Mar. 14, 2007).

http://www.ssb.no/english/subjects/03/05/fengsling_en/

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South Africa:

Statistics South Africa Report: "The coverage and quality of birth registration data in South Africa, 1998 - 2005" (Report-06-03-01, March 2007, .pdf format, 34p.).

http://www.statssa.gov.za/Publications/statsdownload.asp?PPN=Report-06-03-01&SCH=3878

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Singapore:

Statistics Singapore Compendium: Singapore in Brief 2007 (March 2007, .pdf format, 12p.).

http://www.singstat.gov.sg/keystats/annual/sib/sib2007.pdf

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Sweden:

Statistics Sweden Press Release: "Dads are three years older than mums" (Mar. 15, 2007).

http://www.scb.se/templates/pressinfo____196461.asp

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UK:

1. Communities and Local Government Statistical Release: "New projections of households for England and the regions to 2029" (2007/0045, March 2007).

http://www.communities.gov.uk/index.asp?id=1002882&PressNoticeID=2374

2. Department for Education and Skills First Release: "The Level of Highest Qualification held by Adults: England 2006" (March 2007, .pdf format, 15p., with a data table in Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.dfes.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000715/index.shtml

3. Office of National Statistics News Release: "Digital age takes hold but some still miss out" (Mar. 15, 2007, .pdf format, 4p.).

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/pdfdir/fda0307.pdf

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

Urban Institute Report:

A. "Kids' Share 2007," by Adam Carasso, C. Eugene Steuerle, and Gillian Reynolds (March 2007, .pdf format, 28p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411432

B. "Kids' Share 2007: Data Appendix," by Gillian Reynolds, Elizabeth Bell, Rebecca L. Clark, Rosalind E. Berkowitz, Christopher Spiro, C. Eugene Steuerle, and Adam Carasso (March 2007, .pdf format, 84p.).

http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/901055_KidsShare_Appendix.pdf

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Allen Guttmacher Institute Periodicals:

A. Guttmacher Policy Review (Vol. 10, No. 1, Winter 2007, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/gpr/10/1/index.html

B. Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health (Vol. 39, No. 1, March 2007. Note: All abstracts and selected full text articles only are available.

http://www.guttmacher.org/journals/toc/psrh3901toc.html

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National Education Association Report: "A Report on the Status of Hispanics in Education: Overcoming a History of Neglect," by Richard Verdugo (2006, .pdf format, 74p.). The report is linked to from a NEA news release: "NEA Issues Report on Status of Hispanics in Education" (Mar. 15, 2007).

http://www.nea.org/newsreleases/2007/nr070315.html

Link to full text is at the bottom of the news release.

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University of Wisconsin-Madison Applied Population Laboratory Periodical: Population Notes, Vol. 2, No. 1, March 2007, .pdf format, 4p.

http://www.apl.wisc.edu/reports/Population_Notes_March2007.pdf

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WORKING PAPERS:

University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Demography and Ecology: "Formal Religious Participation and Daily Spiritual Experiences: Separate, but Equal, Linkages with Psychological Well-Being?" by Emily A. Greenfield, George Vaillant and Nadine F. Marks (WP #2007-01, March 2007, .pdf format, 26p.)

Abstract:

Building on the idea that religiosity and spirituality are related yet distinct phenomena, this study examined whether formal religious participation and daily spiritual experiences are independently and equally associated with diverse dimensions of psychological well-being (negative affect, positive affect, purpose in life, positive relations with others, personal growth , self-acceptance, environmental mastery, and autonomy). Data came from 1,801 respondents in the 2005 National Survey of Midlife in the U.S. (MIDUS). Results indicated that more frequent daily spiritual experiences were independently and consistently associated with better psychological well-being; three salutary associations were stronger among women than men. Although more frequent formal religious participation was independently associated with higher purpose in life, positive relations with others, and (among older adults) personal growth, it was also linked with lower autonomy and environmental mastery. Overall, results suggest that daily spiritual experiences and formal religious participation are linked in separate and non-equal ways with psychological well-being.

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cde/cdewp/2007-01.pdf

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John F. Kennedy School of Government [Harvard University]: "College Grants on a Postcard: A Proposal for Simple and Predictable Federal Student Aid," by Susan Dynarski and Judith Scott-Clayton (Working Paper No. RWP07-014, March 2007, .pdf format, 52p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://ksgnotes1.harvard.edu/research/wpaper.nsf/rwp/RWP07-014

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United Nations Children's Fund Innocenti Research Center: "Comparing Child Well-Being in OECD Countries: Concepts and Methods," by Jonathan Bradshaw, Petra Hoelscher, and Dominic Richardson (IWP 2006-03, December 2006, .pdf format, 117p.).

Summary:

This paper is produced alongside Innocenti Report Card 7 Child Well-being in Rich Countries.

http://www.unicef-icdc.org/cgi-bin/unicef/Lunga.sql?ProductID=445

It provides more detail on how the indicators were chosen for the Report Card, and how they were combined into components and then into dimensions. It also provides additional analysis to complement the Report Card. We started working on this topic in reaction to the cautious approach to indicator development of the Indicators Sub Committee of the European Union Social Protection Committee. The so-called Laeken Primary and Secondary Indicators are not well adjusted to capture children’s well-being and currently only contain child breakdowns for a relative poverty measure and jobless households. Although in the report by Professor Tony Atkinson and colleagues prepared for the Luxembourg Presidency (Atkinson et al., 2005) there was a proposal that children should be ‘mainstreamed’, it was suggested (by the Head of Eurostat) that only one child-related indicator should be added to the Laeken Primary Indicators -- on educational achievement. Our aspiration was to demonstrate that much more was possible using already available data. So during the UK Presidency of the EU we set about building an index of child well-being that will be published in Social Indicators Research (Bradshaw, Hoelscher and Richardson, 2006). The EU index is different to the analysis developed in this paper mainly because it exploits European data sources not available for OECD countries. This paper begins in Section 1 with a background review of previous conceptualisations of child wellbeing. Then in Section 2 we develop a framework for the analysis drawing on a rights-based approach; notions of creating of well-being; and ideas about children’s interaction with their environment. Section 3 reviews the methods employed in developing the dimensions. Section 4 presents the results for each dimension. Section 5 is a concluding discussion. There is an appendix containing the raw data.

http://www.unicef-icdc.org/publications/pdf/iwp2006_03_eng.pdf

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World Bank Development Programme: "Pathways out of poverty during an economic crisis : an empirical assessment of rural Indonesia," by C. Peter Timmer, Julian Weisbrod, and Neil McColloch (WPS 4173, March 2007, ASCII text and .pdf format, 50p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://econ.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64165259&theSitePK=469382&piPK=64165421&menuPK=64166093&entityID=000016406_20070320111814

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Statistics Canada: "Profiles of Ethnic Communities in Canada : The Chinese Community in Canada, 2001," by Colin Lindsay (March 2007, .pdf format, 18p.).

http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/89-621-XIE/89-621-XIE2006001.pdf

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Max Plank Institute for Demographic Research:

A. "Towards smaller family size in Egypt, Morocco and Turkey: overall change over time or socio-economic compositional effect?" by Agata D'Addato, Daniele Vignoli, and Sutay Yavuz (WP-2007-12, March 2007, .pdf format, 20p.).

Abstract:

The whole region of the South and East Mediterranean exhibits a profound fertility transition with marked differences in the pace of fertility declines among the countries. The authors choose three representative countries: Egypt, Morocco and Turkey. Determinants of the propensity towards smaller family size are investigated as scrutinizing the development in the pattern of third births, which represents the critical step in the transitional process for these countries. The authors are particularly interested in verifying whether the decline of higher-order births is significantly driven by an overall societal change over time or by compositional change over different socio-economic segments of the female population. Evidence is found that overall societal changes have mainly driven the decline in large family size, though, to a much lesser extent, compositional changes are important too.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2007-012.pdf

B. "Gibt es eine zunehmende bildungsspezifische Polarisierung der Erwerbsmuster von Frauen? Analysen auf Basis der Mikrozensen 1976-2004," by Michaela Kreyenfeld, Dirk Konietzka, and Esther Geisler (WP-2007-013, March 2007, .pdf format, 63p.). The title in English is: "Did the polarization in female employment patterns increase over time? An investigation with the German micro-census 1976-2004." The paper is in German

Abstract:

This paper examines the development of female and maternal labor market participation in western Germany. We discuss major forces that contribute to educational differences in female employment behavior. The empirical investigation draws on data from the scientific-use-files of the micro-censuses from the years 1976 to 2004. While part-time and marginal employment rates of mothers have increased in recent years, their full-time employment rates have decreased. Particularly, the least educated mothers show dramatic reductions in their working hours over time. Full-time employment is most common among highly educated mothers and the "dual breadwinner model" is most common among highly educated couples. This finding has major consequences for the concentration of economic resources and inequality between households and families.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2007-013.pdf

C. "Fertility differences by housing type: an effect of housing conditions or of selective moves?" by Hill Kulu and Andres Vikat (WP-2007-014, March 2007, .pdf format, 21p.).

Abstract:

This study examines fertility variation across housing types and childbearing patterns after housing changes. While the effect of family changes on housing choices has been studied in detail, little is known about childbearing patterns within various housing types, despite the fact that many studies suggest housing as an important determinant of fertility. We use longitudinal register data from Finland and apply hazard regression. Firstly, we observe a significant variation in the fertility levels across housing types -- fertility is highest among couples in single-family houses and lowest among those in apartments, with the variation remaining significant even after controlling for the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of women. Secondly, our results show elevated fertility levels after couples have changed their housing, suggesting that much of the fertility variation across housing types could be attributed to selective moves. Thirdly, the study also reveals relatively a high risk of third birth for couples in single-family houses several years after the move, suggesting that living in spacious housing and in a family-friendly environment for a longer time may lead to higher fertility.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2007-014.pdf

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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "The International Transferability of Immigrants’ Human Capital Skills," by Barry R. Chiswick and Paul W. Miller (Discussion Paper 2670, March 2007, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses the approach in the under/over education literature to analyze the extent of matching of educational level to occupational attainment among adult native born and foreign born men in the U.S., using the 2000 Census. Overeducation is found to be more common among recent labor market entrants, while undereducation is more likely among older workers. Married men, veterans and those living in metropolitan areas are also more likely to be overeducated. Among immigrants, greater pre-immigration labor market experience is associated with poorer job matches, presumably due to the less than perfect international transferability of skills. A longer duration in the U.S., however, is associated with a lower probability of being overeducated and a greater probability of being undereducated. This is consistent with immigrants being favorably selected for occupational advancement but this effect becomes realized only after overcoming the disadvantages of the less than perfect international transferability of their pre-immigration skills.

http://ftp.iza.org/dp2670.pdf

B. "Earnings and Occupational Attainment: Immigrants and the Native Born," by Barry R. Chiswick and Paul W. Miller (Discussion Paper 2676, March 2007, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

This paper examines the determinants of occupational attainment and the impact of occupation on earnings. Results for both the native born and foreign born are presented, and these provide insights as to the earnings penalties associated with the less-than-perfect international transferability of human capital skills. It shows that around 50 percent of the earnings gains associated with years of schooling derives from inter-occupational mobility. When occupation is held constant, there is a large increase in the effect on earnings of pre-immigration labor market experience for the foreign born, but little change in either the payoff to labor market experience for the native born, or in the premium for post-arrival labor market experience for the foreign born. The estimates of the models of occupational attainment show that years of schooling, and, among the foreign born, proficiency in English, are the key factors determining access to high-paying occupations. Labor market experience has little effect on occupational outcomes among the native born. However, evaluated at 10 years, foreign labor market experience has a modest negative impact on current occupational status. Examination of this negative effect using quantile regression shows that it is concentrated among those in high status jobs.

http://ftp.iza.org/dp2676.pdf

C. "Immigration, Integration and the Labour Market: Turkish Immigrants in Germany and the Netherlands," by Rob Euwals, Jaco Dagevos, Merove Gijsberts, and Hans Roodenburg (Discussion Paper 2677, March 2007, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

On the basis of three micro datasets, the German Socio-Economic Panel 2002, the Dutch Social Position and Use of Provision Survey 2002 and the Dutch Labour Force Survey 2002, we investigate the labour market position of Turkish immigrants in Germany and the Netherlands. We compare labour market outcomes of Turkish immigrants, including both the first and second generation, and natives in both countries by using the Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition method. We find that Turkish immigrants have lower employment rates, lower tenured job rates and lower job prestige scores than natives. In both countries, the lower level of education and the age composition of the Turkish immigrants partly explains the unfavourable labour market position. The standardized gap -- the gap that remains after correction for the observed individual characteristics -- in the employment and tenured job rate remains large for the Netherlands, while the standardized gap in the job prestige score remains large for Germany. Differences in past immigration policies between Germany and the Netherlands are likely to be important for explaining the labour market position of Turkish men in both countries.

http://ftp.iza.org/dp2677.pdf

D. "Rationality as a Barrier to Peace: Micro-Evidence from Kosovo," by Sumon Bhaumik, Ira N. Gang, and Myeong-Su Yun (Discussion Paper 2682, March 2007, .pdf format, 31p.).

Abstract:

Despite a significant expansion of the literature on conflicts and fragility of states, only a few systematic attempts have been made to link the theoretical literature on social conflicts to the available micro-level information about the people who are involved in these conflicts. We address this lacuna in the literature using a household-level data set from Kosovo. Our analysis suggests that it is individually rational for competing ethnic communities, Kosovo Albanians and Kosovo Serbs, to resist a quick agreement on a social contract to share the region’s resources.

http://ftp.iza.org/dp2682.pdf

E. "The Labour Market Position of Turkish Immigrants in Germany and the Netherlands: Reason for Migration, Naturalisation and Language Proficiency," by Rob Euwals, Jaco Dagevos, Merove Gijsberts, Hans Roodenburg (Discussion Paper 2683, March 2007, .pdf format, 33p.).

Abstract:

On the basis of the German Socio-Economic Panel 2002 and the Dutch Social Position and Use of Provision Survey 2002, we investigate the importance of characteristics related to immigration for the labour market position of Turkish immigrants. We use regression techniques to correct for composition effects in employment rates, tenured job rates and job prestige scores (ISEI). First, we find that educational attainment and language proficiency have a higher return in the Netherlands than in Germany. Second, we find that second generation immigrants have improved their labour market position relative to the first generation of labour migrants and their partners. The improvement is largely due to an improvement in educational attainment and language proficiency. Third, for the Netherlands we find a positive relation between naturalisation and labour market position, while for Germany we find a negative relation with tenured employment. The contrasting results on tenured employment may be explained partly by differences in immigration rules. In Germany economic self-reliance is more important than in the Netherlands, and this may lead to a stronger incentive to naturalise for workers with a temporary contract.

http://ftp.iza.org/dp2683.pdf

F. "How Many Hours Do You Have to Work to Be Integrated? Full Time and Part Time Employment of Native and Ethnic Minority Women in the Netherlands," by Pieter Bevelander, and Sandra Groeneveld (Discussion Paper 2684, March 2007, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract:

Labor market participation is a central factor in the economic integration of migrants in their host country. Labor market integration of ethnic minority women is of special interest, as they may experience a double disadvantage: both as a woman and as a migrant. Since the late nineties this presumed double disadvantage has become more and more the focus of both Dutch integration and Dutch emancipation policy. To test several assumptions underlying Dutch policy this paper focuses on the employment patterns of ethnic minority and native women in the Netherlands. In particular, we analyze to what extent labor market participation of different groups of women and the hours they work are influenced by human capital and household characteristics. Our results show some remarkable differences in employment patterns between native Dutch and ethnic minority women. Controlling for educational level, partnership and the presence of children, native Dutch women are working more often in part time jobs than Mediterranean and Caribbean women. For all women the educational level is an important determinant of employment and the number of hours worked. Whereas the number of children influences both the employment decision and the number of hours worked of native Dutch women, for Mediterranean and Caribbean women there is only an effect of the number of children on the odds of having a full time job.

http://ftp.iza.org/dp2684.pdf

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Center for Economic Studies/Ifo Institute for Economic Research (CESifo) [Munich, Bavaria, Germany]: "Unemployment and Gang Crime: Could Prosperity Backfire?" by Panu Poutvaara and Mikael Priks (WP 1944, March 2007, .pdf format, 16p.).

Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page?_pageid=36,302752&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL&p_file_id=14018

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

IngentaConnect Tables of Contents: IngentaConnect provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

Point your browser to:

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/

Click on "Browse" and browse to the journal of choice.

American Sociological Review (Vol. 72, No. 2, April 2007). Note: Full electronic text of these journals are available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

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Population Research and Policy Review (Vol. 25, No. 5-6, December 2006). Note: Full electronic text of these journals are available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.springerlink.com/content/q2n660002114/?p7cc92279b75b41509b39b2e6a5e373aa&pi=0

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CONFERENCES:

Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research (Rostock, Germany): "Workshop on 'Multilevel Event History Analysis in Family and Fertility Research'," to be held in Rostock Germany, Nov. 6-7, 2007. For more information see (.pdf format, 1p.).

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/calendar/files/2285.01068115234-Workshop%20Description.pdf

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US National Center for Education Statistics Upcoming Workshops: NCES has provided information about eight upcoming workshops concerning various NCES surveys at:

http://ies.ed.gov/whatsnew/conferences/

See under "Upcoming Workshops"

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LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES:

US. House Committee on Education and Labor\U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Joint Hearing Testimony: "Elementary and Secondary Act Reauthorization: Improving NCLB to Close the Achievement Gap," a hearing held March 13, 2007 (.pdf and Windows Media format, video running time 2 hours 32 minutes, 31 seconds).

http://edworkforce.house.gov/hearings/joint031307.shtml

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DATA:

US National Center for Education Statistics Data Documentation: "Documentation for the 2004-05 Teacher Follow-up Survey," by Shawna Cox, Deanna Lyter, Randall Parmer, Steven Tourkin, and Toni Warner (NCES 2007349, March 2007, .pdf format, 251p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2007349

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US Geological Survey/Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics Consortium (MRLC) Database: "Land Cover Database: 2001" (March 2007, .zip compressed shape files and Dbase .dbf format). The data is linked to from an USGS news release: "Land Cover Database Details State of the Land: Lower 48 described with Census-like accuracy" (Mar. 19, 2007).

http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=1633

Click on MRLC Internet address in the first paragraph of the news release for link to data.

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Human Mortality Database Update: Note: HMR requires free registration before providing data. Data for East Germany revised (1956-2004).

Data availability:

http://www.mortality.org/Public/DataAvailability.html

Data access:

http://www.mortality.org/

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National Longitudinal Survey: The Center for Human Resource Research at Ohio State University recently released the follow updated NLSY data file:

D79-2004-Rev3 NLSY79, 1979-2004, Main File and Work History Data, Revised3

http://www.chrr.ohio-state.edu/nls-info/ordering/display_db.php3

and scroll to or find in page "D79-2004-Rev3" (without the quotes).

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Panel Study of Income Dynamics: The University of Michigan Institute for Social Research PSID has recently released the following data file:

2005 Family, Individual and Family History files have been released.

PSID data and documentation can be downloaded at:

http://psidonline.isr.umich.edu/Data/

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Luxembourg Income Study: "Beside the introduction of the Wave V, Release 2 LIS has applied several technical changes to the lissy access system." (March 12, 2007). These changes include: how to specify a country file within extract programs; new country codes; elimination of the child file; and new SAS labels.

http://www.lisproject.org/whatsnew.htm

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Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at he University of Michigan released several new datasets on Mar. 19, 2007, which may be of interest to Economics researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

New and updated data:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/org/announce.html

The new releases are listed after the website update announcement.

All new and updated data in the last 90 days can be found at:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/access/recent.html

Click on "list".

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WEBSITES OF INTEREST:

National Center for Education Statistics: "State Education Reforms website," (March 2007). The site has been updated to include: "[t]wo new tables on exit exams have been added to the Standards Assessment, and Accountability area and three new tables on longitudinal data systems, school exit exams, and kindergarten policies have been added to Resources for Learning area."

http://nces.ed.gov/programs/statereform/

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Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development "OECD work on gender - www.oecd.org/gender." "Women often excel at school and generally have longer life expectancy. But men frequently earn more and are more likely to hold positions of power in political and economic life. The OECD looks at the implications of such inequalities for economic development and what can be done to develop policies for parity. Barriers that prevent women from working or getting the training and education that they need to be more productive impose a cost on society as well as the individual." This page links to OECD information on the topic.

http://www.oecd.org/site/0,2865,en_21571361_38039199_1_1_1_1_1,00.html

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