Current Social Science Research Report--Sociology #66, June 3, 2008.

CSSRR-Social is a weekly email report produced by the Data and Information Services Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It seeks to help social science researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/cssrindex.html

=========================================================================

CSSRR-Social is compiled and edited by Jack Solock and Charlie Fiss.

=========================================================================

To CSSRR-Econ #66

To CSSRR-Health #66

CSSRR-Index

=========================================================================

Index to this issue:

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

CENTRAL GOVERNMENT AND NGO STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

US

US STATES

NGO AND OTHER COUNTRIES

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

WORKING PAPERS

TABLES OF CONTENTS

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

DATA

=========================================================================

CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL AND NGO PUBLICATIONS

US:

1. Census Bureau Facts for Features: "Special Edition--Conversion from Analog to Digital-TV--Feb. 17, 2009" (CB08-FFSE.03, May 29, 2008, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/012025.html

2. National Center for Education Statistics Compendium: The Condition of Education 2008 (NCES 2008031, June 2008, .pdf format, 334p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/getpubcats.asp?sid=091#

3. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Report: "Violence by Teenage Girls: Trends and Context," by Margaret A. Zahn, Susan Brumbaugh, Darrell Steffensmeier, Barry C. Feld, Merry Morash, Meda Chesney-Lind, Jody Miller, Allison Ann Payne, Denise C. Gottfredson, and Candace Kruttschnitt (NCJ 218905, May 2008, .pdf format, 23p.).

http://www.ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/publications/PubAbstract.asp?pubi=240649

4. Congressional Research Service Report: "Alien Smuggling: Recent Legislative Developments," by Yule Kim (RL34501, May 2008, .pdf format, 11p.).

http://opencrs.cdt.org/document/RL34501

5. US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Report: "The Food Assistance Landscape: FY 2007 Annual Report," by Victor Oliveira (Economic Information Bulletin No. (EIB-6-5), May 2008, .pdf format, 6p.).

http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/EIB6-5/

Return to top

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

US States:

Maryland:

State Data Center Report: "U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates by Age, Race and Gender for Maryland (state only), April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2007" (June 2008, Microsoft Excel and .pdf format).

http://www.mdp.state.md.us/msdc/pop_estimate/estimate_00to07/by_age_race_sex/MdState/MD_ASR_CensPopEst00_07.htm

Wisconsin:

Department of Health and Family Services WISH Population Module Update: "WISH, the interactive data query system from the Department of Health and Family Services, has been updated to add new years of data (2005 and 2006) to the modules containing statewide and local data from the Wisconsin Violent Death Reporting System (WVDRS)."

http://dhfs.wisconsin.gov/wish

Return to top

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

NGO and Other Countries:

European Commission:

Eurostat Compendium: Europe in figures - Eurostat statistical yearbook 2008 (June 2008, .pdf format, 566p.).

http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/portal/page?_pageid=1073,46587259&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL&p_product_code=KS-CD-07-001

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Canada:

Statistics Canada/Statistique Canada Periodical: Canadian Social Trends (No. 85, June 2008, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/11-008-XIE/11-008-XIE2008001.htm

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Finland:

Statistic Finland News Release: "Families numbered 1.4 million" (May 30, 2008). The news release links to several topical tables and charts.

http://www.stat.fi/til/perh/2007/perh_2007_2008-05-30_tie_001_en.html

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

France:

Institut national d'etudes demographques (INED) Periodical: Population and societies (No. 445, May 2008, .pdf format, 4p.). The feature article of this issue is: "Sexual violence in France: breaking the silence," by Nathalie Bajos and Michel Bozon.

http://www.ined.fr/en/resources_documentation/publications/pop_soc/bdd/publication/1359/

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Iceland:

Statistics Iceland Report, News Release:

A. "Students and qualifications at the age of 24" (June 2008, .pdf format, 15p.). The report is in Icelandic, with table heads and a summary in English.

http://www.statice.is/Pages/452?itemid=4c9976ee-f2fb-46b5-b168-7b43c6feda23

B. "Enrolment in upper secondary and tertiary education in autumn 2007" (May 30, 2008). The news release links to several topical tables.

http://www.statice.is/Pages/444?NewsID=2994

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Macedonia:

State Statistical Office News Releases:

A. "Increased number of Masters of science in 2007" (May 28, 2008, .pdf format, 12 p.).

http://www.stat.gov.mk/english/statistiki_eng.asp?ss=06.01&rbs=2

B. "Doctors of sciences" (May 28, 2008, .pdf format, 4p.).

http://www.stat.gov.mk/english/statistiki_eng.asp?ss=06.01&rbs=7

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Malta:

National Statistics Office News Release: "Theatres: 2006" (May 2008, .pdf format, 4p.).

http://www.nso.gov.mt/statdoc/document_view.aspx?id=2189&backUrl=news_by_date.aspx%3fretainCriteria%3dtrue

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Moldava:

National Bureau of Statistics Compendium: Moldava in Figures: 2008 (May 2008, .pdf format, 92p.).

http://www.statistica.md/publications/187/en/Moldova_in_cifre_2008_en-fr.pdf

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Netherlands:

Statistics Netherlands Web Magazine Articles:

A. "Disregarding Cito advice often leads to switch to different level in second year," by Lieke Stroucken, Dick Takkenberg, and Anton Béguin (May 29, 2008).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/onderwijs/publicaties/artikelen/archief/2008/2008-2470-wm.htm

B. "Students borrow more and more" (May 29, 2008).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/onderwijs/publicaties/artikelen/archief/2008/2008-2464-wm.htm

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

New Zealand:

Statistics New Zealand/Tatauranga Aotearoa Report: "QuickStats About Pacific Peoples" (May 2008, HTML and .pdf format, 18p.).

http://www.stats.govt.nz/census/2006-census-data/quickstats-about-pacific-peoples/quickstats-about-pacific-peoples.htm

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Norway:

Statistics Norway News Releases:

A. "Education statistics. Graduates from Universities and Colleges, 2006/07" (Jun. 2, 2008)> The news release links to four topical tables.

http://www.ssb.no/english/subjects/04/02/40/eksuvh_en/

B. "Mediations, 2007. Final figures: Separation of cohabitants behind 4 500 mediations" (Jun. 3, 2008). The news release links to five topical tables.

http://www.ssb.no/english/subjects/03/04/meklingfam_en/

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Poland:

Central Statistical Office Report: "Population. Size and structure by territorial division. As of December 31, 2007" (June 2008,.pdf and .zip compressed .pdf format, 163p.). The report is in Polish and English.

http://www.stat.gov.pl/gus/45_655_ENG_HTML.htm

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Scotland:

Scottish Government Reports:

A. "Crime and Justice Trends" (June 2008, .pdf format, 22p.).

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Crime-Justice

B. "Statistical Bulletin: Crime and Justice Series: Drug Seizures by Scottish Police Forces, 2005/2006 and 2006/2007" (June 2008, .pdf format, 20p.).

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2008/06/02105838/0

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Slovenia:

Statistical Office News Release: "Institutions, child and youth homes and other establishments for lodging of children and youth with special needs, Slovenia, 2007" (May 29, 2008).

http://www.stat.si/eng/novica_prikazi.aspx?id=1655

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Sweden:

Statistics Sweden Press Release: "Population projections 2008-2050" (May 29, 2008).

http://www.scb.se/templates/pressinfo____237868.asp

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

UK:

1. Department for Children, Schools, and Families Report: "Provision for Children Under Five Years of Age in England: January 2008" (May 2008, .pdf and Microsoft Excel format, 19p.).

http://www.dfes.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000790/index.shtml

2. Ministry of Justice Report: "Population in custody April 2008" (May 2008, .pdf and Microsoft Excel format, 13p.).

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/populationincustody.htm

3. National Statistics Office Periodical: Monthly Digest of Statistics, edited by Dilys Rosen (May 2008, .pdf format, 135p.).

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Product.asp?vlnk=611

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Wales:

Welsh Assembly Government/Llywodraeth Cynulliad Cymru Report: "Schools in Wales: Examination Performance 2007" (May 2008, .pdf format, 150p.).

http://new.wales.gov.uk/topics/statistics/headlines/schools2008/hdw20080529/?lang=en

Return to top

=========================================================================

OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.:

Urban Institute Fact Sheet: "The Challenges of Prisoner Reentry: Facts and Figures," by Daniel Kuehn (May 2008, .pdf format, 3p.).

http://www.urban.org/publications/411683.html

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Springer Book: People, Population Change and Policies: Lessons from the Population Policy Acceptance Study vol. 1: Family Change, edited by Charlotte Höhn, Dragana Avramov, and Irena E. Kotowska (2008, 444p., ISBN: 978-1-4020-6608-5). For more information see:

http://www.springer.com/social+sciences/demography/book/978-1-4020-6608-5?cm_mmc=NBA-_-May-08_WEST_1843704-_-product-_-978-1-4020-6608-5

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Guttmacher Institute Periodical: Guttmacher Policy Review (Vol. 11, No. 2, Spring 2008, .pdf and HTML format).

http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/gpr/11/2/index.html

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Demographic Research Article: "The reporting of statistical significance in scientific journals: A reflexion," by Jan M. Hoem (Vol. 18, Article 15, June 2008, .pdf format, p. 437-442). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.demographic-research.org/Volumes/Vol18/15/default.htm

Return to top

=========================================================================

WORKING PAPERS:

University Of Michigan Population Studies Center:

A. "Shape of the BMI-Mortality Association by Cause of Death, Using Generalized Additive Models: NHIS 1986-2002," by Anna Zajacova (PSC Research Report No. 08-639, June 2008, .pdf format, 26p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.html?ID=5368

B. "Displaced New Orleans Residents in the Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina: Results from a Pilot Survey," by Narayan Sastry (PSC Research Report No. 08-640, June 2008, .pdf format, 23p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.html?ID=5369

C. "Tracing the Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Population of New Orleans: The Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study," by Narayan Sastry (PSC Research Report No. 08-637, May 2008, .pdf format, 27p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.html?ID=5366

D. "Foreign Occupation and National Pride: The Case of Iraq," by Mansoor Moaddel, Mark Tessler, and Ronald F. Inglehart (PSC Research Report No. 08-638, June 2008, .pdf format, 28p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.html?ID=5367

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Center for Research on Child Wellbeing (Princeton University):

A. "The Relative Effects of Family Instability and Mother/Partner Conflict on Children's Externalizing Behavior," by Paula Fromby and Cynthia Osborne (Working Paper WP08-07-FF, May 2008, .pdf format, 19p.). There is no abstract for this paper.

http://crcw.princeton.edu/workingpapers/WP08-07-FF.pdf

B. "Partnership Instability and Child Wellbeing during the Transition to Elementary School," by Carey Cooper, Cynthia Osborne, Audrey Beck, and Sara McLanahan (Working Paper WP08-08-FF, May 2008, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

Data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 2,957) are used to examine partnership instability and children’s wellbeing during the transition to elementary school. We find that coresidential transitions are related to externalizing, attention, and social problems. Mothers’ mental health and use of harsh parenting partially mediate the associations between coresidential transitions and child outcomes at age five. The impact of coresidential transitions on externalizing, attention, and social problems is stronger for boys than girls. Also, non-coresidential transitions predict externalizing and attention problems for White children but not for Hispanic children. Finally, the association between coresidential transitions and verbal ability is stronger for children with highly educated mothers than for children of less educated mothers.

http://crcw.princeton.edu/workingpapers/WP08-08-FF.pdf

C. "Incarceration and Support for Children in Fragile Families," by Amanda Geller, Irwin Garfinkel, and Bruce Western (Working Paper WP08-09-FF, May 2008, .pdf format, 31p.).

Abstract:

Incarceration is widespread in the United States, and previous literature has shown significant negative effects of incarceration on later employment, earnings, and relationship stability. Given the high rates of fatherhood among men in jails and prisons, a large number of children are placed at considerable risk when a parent is incarcerated. This paper examines one dimension of the economic risk faced by children of incarcerated fathers: the reduction in the financial support that they receive. We use a population-based sample of urban children to examine the effects of incarceration on this support. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal regression models, as well as a propensity score matching analysis, indicate that men with incarceration histories are significantly less likely to contribute to their families and those that do contribute provide significantly less. Moreover, sensitivity analysis suggests that these differences are unlikely to be a result of unobserved heterogeneity between incarcerated and never-incarcerated fathers. The negative effects of incarceration on fathers’ financial support are due not only to diminished performance in the labor market by formerly incarcerated men, but also to their increased likelihood to live apart from their children. Men contribute far less through child support (formal or informal) than they do when they share their earnings within their household, suggesting that the destabilizing effects of incarceration on family relationships place children at significant economic disadvantage.

http://crcw.princeton.edu/workingpapers/WP08-09-FF.pdf

D. "Parental Incarceration and Child Wellbeing: Implications for Urban Families," by Amanda Geller, Irwin Garfinkel, Carey Cooper, and Ronald Mincy (Working Paper WP08-10-FF, May 2008, .pdf format, 31p.). No abstract is available.

http://crcw.princeton.edu/workingpapers/WP08-10-FF.pdf

E. "Family Structure and Child Health Outcomes in Fragile Families," by Sharon Bzostek and Audrey Beck (Working Paper WP08-11-FF, May 2008, .pdf format, 23p.).

Abstract:

Dramatic changes in family demography in the United States have led to increasing numbers of children living in "non-traditional" households. A large body of literature documents the association between living in a non-traditional family structure/familial instability and children’s cognitive and behavioral outcomes. In contrast, relatively little research has focused on the relationship between family structure and instability and children’s physical health outcomes, despite the fact that there is good theoretical reason to expect that family structure and instability might be associated with children’s physical health.

The current study uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to assess whether family structure and familial instability are associated with a variety of children’s physical health outcomes. The paper pays particular attention to possible mediating mechanisms and utilizes longitudinal data to address potential problems of selection bias and reverse causality. The results suggest that children living with two married biological parents tend to fare better than children living in less traditional family structures across a variety of physical health outcomes, and that at least some portion of these relationships are likely the result of selection bias and/or reverse causality.

http://crcw.princeton.edu/workingpapers/WP08-11-FF.pdf

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Bureau of Economic Research:

A. "Does Your Cohort Matter? Measuring Peer Effects in College Achievement," by Scott E. Carrell, Richard L. Fullerton, and James E. West (w14032, May 2008, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract:

To estimate peer effects in college achievement we exploit a unique dataset in which individuals have been exogenously assigned to peer groups of about 30 students with whom they are required to spend the majority of their time interacting. This feature enables us to estimate peer effects that are more comparable to changing the entire cohort of peers. Using this broad peer group, we find academic peer effects of much larger magnitude than found in previous studies that have measured peer effects among roommates alone. We find the peer effects persist at a diminishing rate into the sophomore, junior, and senior years, indicating social network peer effects may have long lasting effects on academic achievement. Our findings also suggest that peer effects may be working through study partnerships versus operating through establishment of a social norm of effort.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w14032

B. "Who Gentrifies Low-Income Neighborhoods?" by Terra McKinnish, Randall Walsh, and Kirk White (w14036, May 2008, .pdf format, 42p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses confidential Census data, specifically the 1990 and 2000 Census Long Form data, to study the demographic processes underlying the gentrification of low-income urban neighborhoods during the 1990's. In contrast to previous studies, the analysis is conducted at the more refined census-tract level with a narrower definition of gentrification and more closely matched comparison neighborhoods. The analysis is also richly disaggregated by demographic characteristic, uncovering differential patterns by race, education, age and family structure that would not have emerged in the more aggregate analysis in previous studies. The results provide no evidence of displacement of low-income non-white households in gentrifying neighborhoods. The bulk of the increase in average family income in gentrifying neighborhoods is attributed to black high school graduates and white college graduates. The disproportionate retention and income gains of the former and the disproportionate in-migration of the latter are distinguishing characteristics of gentrifying U.S. urban neighborhoods in the 1990's.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w14036

C. "Health, Human Capital, and African American Migration Before 1910," by Trevon D. Logan (w14037, May 2008, .pdf format, 45p.).

Abstract:

This is the first paper to document the effect of health on the migration propensities of African Americans in the American past. Using both IPUMS and the Colored Troops Sample of the Civil War Union Army Data, I estimate the effects of literacy and health on the migration propensities of African Americans from 1870 to 1910. I find that literacy and health shocks were strong predictors of migration and the stock of health was not. There were differential selection propensities based on slave status - former slaves were less likely to migrate given a specific health shock than free blacks. Counterfactuals suggest that as much as 35% of the difference in the mobility patterns of former slaves and free blacks is explained by differences in their human capital, and more than 20% of that difference is due to health alone. Overall, the selection effect of literacy on migration is reduced by one-tenth to one-third once health is controlled for. The low levels of human capital accumulation and rates of mobility for African Americans after the Civil War are partly explained by the poor health status of slaves and their immediate descendants.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w14037

D. "Return Migration as a Channel of Brain Gain," by Karin Mayr and Giovanni Peri (w14039, May 2008, .pdf format, 51p.).

Abstract:

Recent theoretical and empirical studies have emphasized the fact that the prospect of international migration increases the expected returns to skills in poor countries, linking the possibility of migrating (brain drain) with incentives to higher education (brain gain). If emigration is uncertain and some of the highly educated remain, such a channel may, at least in part, counterbalance the negative effects of brain drain. Moreover, recent empirical evidence seems to show that temporary migration is widespread among highly skilled migrants (such as Eastern Europeans in Western Europe and Asians in the U.S.). This paper develops a simple tractable overlapping generations model that provides an economic rationale for return migration and which predicts who will migrate and who will return among agents with heterogeneous abilities. We use parameter values from the literature and the data on return migration to simulate the model and quantify the effects of increased openness on human capital and wages of the sending countries. We find that, for plausible values of the parameters, the return migration channel is very important and combined with the incentive channel reverses the brain drain into significant brain gain for the sending country.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w14039

E. "Taking the Easy Way Out: How the GED Testing Program Induces Students to Drop Out," by James J. Heckman, Paul A. LaFontaine, and Pedro L. Rodriguez (w14044, May 2008, .pdf format, 45p.).

Abstract:

We exploit an exogenous increase in General Educational Development (GED) testing requirements to determine whether raising the difficulty of the test causes students to finish high school rather than drop out and GED certify. We find that a six point decrease in GED pass rates induces a 1.3 point decline in overall dropout rates. The effect size is also much larger for older students and minorities. Finally, a natural experiment based on the late introduction of the GED in California reveals, that adopting the program increased the dropout rate by 3 points more relative to other states during the mid-1970s.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w14044

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Vienna Institute of Demography: "Alcohol-related mortality among men in Austria: 1981-2002 and the importance of qualification and employment," by Franz Schwarz, Christian Korbel, and Johannes Klotz (Working Paper No. 2-2008, May 2008, .pdf format, 12p.).

Abstract:

The aim of this paper is to explore the relationship between alcohol-related mortality and social status among men in Austria, and to examine changes during the 1980s and 1990s. We linked individual census records for the Austrian population from 1981, 1991, and 2001 with death register records for a follow-up period of one year. The final data set contains 5,038,654 records of men 35-74 years old, of whom 3824 died of causes explicitly related to alcohol abuse. Standardized mortality ratios by education, occupation and employment were calculated for alcohol- and non-alcohol-related causes of death. A regression-based inequality measure was used for analyses of trends. We find that low educated men were 2.77 (1981/82), 3.49 (1991/92), and 3.23 (2001/02) times more likely to die of alcohol-related causes of death than high educated, while it was just 1.59, 1.80, and 1.89 for other conditions. Among men 35-59 years old, unskilled blue-collar workers had on average a 5.6 and 5.0 times higher risk than upper white-collar employees in 1981/82 and 1991/92; for non-alcohol related causes it was 2.0 and 2.2. Unemployed or early retired men were particularly at risk. In 2001/02 low-skilled inactive were 18 times more likely to die on alcohol-related causes than high-skilled economically active men. Over time the social inequalities in alcohol-related mortality increased but only between 1981/82 and 1991/92; and among those 35-59 years old only for the economically inactive. A good education and sophisticated vocational skills are important protective factors for alcohol problems; however, what matters most is whether or not people are employed.

http://www.oeaw.ac.at/vid/download/WP2008_02.pdf

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

California Center for Population Research [University of California-Los Angeles]: "Mother and Daughter Reports about Upward Transfers," by I-Fen Lin (CCPR-010-08, 2008, .pdf format, 26p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://ebi.ccpr.ucla.edu:8080/pwp/ListPaper.do?state=listWorkingPaperDetails&ParentCategory=442

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "Immigrant Labor, Child-Care Services, and the Work-Fertility Trade-Off in the United States," by Delia Furtado and Heinrich Hock (Discussion Paper 3506, May 2008, .pdf format, 35p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.iza.org/index_html?lang=en&mainframe=http%3A//www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/papers/viewAbstract%3Fdp_id%3D3506

B. "Marriage, Partnership and Sexual Orientation: A Study of British University Academics and Administrators," by Delia Furtado and Heinrich Hock (Discussion Paper 3510, May 2008, .pdf format, 19p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.iza.org/index_html?lang=en&mainframe=http%3A//www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/papers/viewAbstract%3Fdp_id%3D3510

C. "From Individual Attitudes towards Migrants to Migration Policy Outcomes: Theory and Evidence," by Giovanni Facchini and Anna Maria Mayda (Discussion Paper 3512, May 2008, .pdf format, 57p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.iza.org/index_html?lang=en&mainframe=http%3A//www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/papers/viewAbstract%3Fdp_id%3D3512

D. "Schools, Skills, and Synapses," by James J. Heckman (Discussion Paper 3515, May 2008, .pdf format, 94p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.iza.org/index_html?lang=en&mainframe=http%3A//www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/papers/viewAbstract%3Fdp_id%3D3515

E. "Armed Conflict and Schooling: Evidence from the 1994 Rwandan Genocide," by Richard Akresh and Damien de Walque (Discussion Paper 3516, May 2008, .pdf format, 35p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.iza.org/index_html?lang=en&mainframe=http%3A//www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/papers/viewAbstract%3Fdp_id%3D3516

Return to top

=========================================================================

JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal (Vol. 36, No. 4, June 2008). Note: Full text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for availability of this database and this issue.

http://fcs.sagepub.com/content/vol36/issue4/?etoc

Return to top

=========================================================================

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

US National Institutes of Health: "Population Research Infrastructure Program FY09 (R24)" (RFA-HD-08-007, reissue of RFA-HD-07-009, Jun. 2, 2008, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HD-08-007.html

Return to top

=========================================================================

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

American Educational Research Association: AERA has updated its employment page with listings through Jun. 3, 2008.

http://careers.aera.net/c/search_results.cfm?site_id=557

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Chronicle of Higher Education:

Sociology positions has been updated through Jun. 3, 2008.

http://chronicle.com/jobs/100/800/8000/

Return to top

=========================================================================

DATA:

Department of Housing and Urban Development Report: "American Housing Survey 2007 Table Specifications (May 2008, .pdf format, 239p.). "The tables specification file shows the special coding used by the Census Bureau to produce the tabulations in the printed report. The specifications are written using a SAS-like syntax. Users may find this file useful when trying to match tabulations from the public use file to the printed tabulations. Note, however, that not all report tabulations can be reproduced from the public use file."

http://www.huduser.org/datasets/ahs/AHS_2007_Table_spec.pdf

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at he University of Michigan released several new datasets as of June 1, 2008, which may be of interest to Sociology researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

New and updated data:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR/announce.html?startdate=2008-05-16&enddate=2008-06-01

All new and updated data in the last 90 days can be found at:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/access/recent.html

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

UK Data Archive (Essex University, Colchester, UK): The UK Data Archive has recently added the following datasets to its holdings. Note: There maybe charges or licensing requirements on holdings of the UK Data Archive. For more information see:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/

SN 5737 -Annual Population Survey, April 2006 - March 2007: Special Licence Access

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5737

Return to top