Current Social Science Research Report--Sociology #44, December 18, 2007.

CSSRR-Social is a weekly email report produced by the Data and Information Services Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It seeks to help social science researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/cssrindex.html

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CSSRR-Social is compiled and edited by Jack Solock and Charlie Fiss.

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To CSSRR-Econ #44

To CSSRR- Health #44

CSSRR-Index

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Index to this issue:

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT AND NGO STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

US

US STATES

NGO AND OTHER COUNTRIES

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

WORKING PAPERS

TABLES OF CONTENTS

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

DATA

WEBSITES OF INTEREST

BIBLIOGRAPHY UPDATES

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL AND NGO PUBLICATIONS

US:

1. National Center for Education Statistics Report:

A. "Projections of Education Statistics to 2016," by William J. Hussar and Tabitha M. Bailey (NCES 2008060, December 2007, .pdf format, 146p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2008060

B. "Deciding on Postsecondary Education," by Keith MacAllum, Denise M. Glover, Barbara Queen, and Angela Riggs (NPEC 2008850, December 2007, .pdf format, 94p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2008850

C. "2004/06 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/06) Methodology Report," by Melissa Cominole, Sara Wheeless, Kristin Dudley, Jeff Franklin, and Jennifer Wine (NCES 2008184, December 2007, .pdf format, 350p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2008184

2. Congressional Budget Office Paper: "The Impact of Unauthorized Immigrants on the Budgets of State and Local Governments," (December 2007, .pdf format, 16p.).

http://www.cbo.gov/ftpdocs/87xx/doc8711/12-6-Immigration.pdf

3. Department of Housing and Urban Development Periodical, Report:

A. Cityscape (Vol. 9, No. 3, 2007, .pdf format, 170p.). Note: this issue is a special theme issue: "Planning for Catastrophe."

http://www.huduser.org/periodicals/cityscpe/vol9num3/index.html

B. "Imputation via Triangular Regression- Based Hot Deck," by Scott Susin (Office of Policy Development and Research, 2007, .pdf format, 10p.).

Abstract:

In principle, hot deck imputation methods preserve means and variances, and can also preserve covariances with other variables included in the allocation matrix. In practice, dimensionality problems arise quickly as predictive variables are added and allocation matrix cells become small, undermining the hot deck’s theoretical advantages. Predictive mean nearest neighbor imputation avoids dimensionality problems, but can reduce the variance. A combination method is described: using the predicted values from a set of sequential, triangular regressions to form hot deck matrices.Triangularity allows the inclusion of predictive variables that are themselves subject to nonresponse. The method enables the rapid development of allocation schemes, eliminates dimensionality problems, and aids in predictor selection.The implementation of this method in American Housing Survey income data is described and evaluated.

http://www.huduser.org/Datasets/ahs/hotdeck.pdf

4. Bureau of Justice Statistics Reports:

A. "Capital Punishment, 2006 - Statistical Tables," by Tracy L. Snell (December 2007, HTML, .pdf, and comma separated value [.csv] format).

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/html/cp/2006/cp06st.htm

B. "Sexual Victimization in State and Federal Prisons Reported by Inmates, 2007," by Allen J. Beck and Paige M. Harrison (NCJ 219414, December 2007, .pdf, ASCII text, and zipped Excel format, 48p.).

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/svsfpri07.htm

C. "Criminal Victimization, 2006," by Michael Rand and Shannan Catalano (NCJ 219413, December 2007, ASCII text and .pdf format, 5p., with .zip compressed spreadsheets).

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/cv06.htm

5. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation Report: "Program and Fiscal Design Elements of Child Welfare Privatization Initiatives," by Charlotte McCullough and Elizabeth Lee (Topical Paper No. 2, December 2007, .pdf format, 31p.).

http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/07/CWPI/models/index.htm

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US States:

New Jersey:

Department of Labor & Workforce Development Annual Demographic Profile: New Jersey Annual Demographic Profile, 2000-2007 (December 2007, HTML and Excel format).

http://www.wnjpin.net/OneStopCareerCenter/LaborMarketInformation/lmi19/index.html

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NGO and Other Countries:

United Nations:

1. Children's Fund Report: "Progress for Children: A World Fit for Children Statistical Review (No. 6)," (December 2007, .pdf format, 68p.).

http://www.unicef.org/publications/index_42117.html

2. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Periodical: Transport and Communications Bulletin for Asia and the Pacific (No. 76, 2007, .pdf format, 106p.). The topic of this issue is "Gender and Transport."

http://www.unescap.org/publications/detail.asp?id=1247

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World Bank:

PovertyNet Report: "Beyond the Numbers: Understanding the Institutions for Monitoring Poverty Reduction Strategies," by Tara Bedi, Aline Coudouel, Marcus Cox, Markus Goldstein, and Nigel Thornton (2007, .pdf format, 230p.).

http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTPOVERTY/EXTPAME/0,,contentMDK:21000002~pagePK:210058~piPK:210062~theSitePK:384263,00.html

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China:

National Bureau of Statistics Compendium: China Social Statistical Yearbook 2007 (December 2007).

http://www.stats.gov.cn/tjsj/ndsj/shehui/2006/2006shehui.htm

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Japan:

Statistical Bureau Yearbook: Japan Statistical Yearbook 2008 (December 2007, .pdf and Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.stat.go.jp/english/data/nenkan/index.htm

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Netherlands:

Statistics Netherlands Web Magazine Article: "Nearly 400 thousand more over-65s in 2013," by Coen van Duin (Dec. 13, 2007).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/bevolking/publicaties/artikelen/archief/2007/2007-2339-wm.htm

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Norway:

Statistics Norway News Release: "2,900 pupils in foreign language groups," (Dec. 11, 2007).

http://www.ssb.no/vis/english/subjects/04/02/20/utgrs_en/art-2007-12-11-01-en.html

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Scotland:

Scotland Government Report: "Destinations of Leavers from Scottish Schools 2006/07" (December 2007, .pdf format, 20p., with tables in Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2007/12/07093501/0

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Sweden:

Statistics Sweden News Release: "Increased margin for consumption," (December 12, 2007).

http://www.scb.se/templates/pressinfo____221531.asp

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UK:

1. Department for Work and Pensions Report: "Fraud and Error in the Benefit System (from March 2006)" (2007, .pdf format, with tables in Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd2/fraud_error.asp

2. Ministry of Justice Report: "Sentencing statistics 2006, England and Wales: (December 2007, .pdf format, 187p.).

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/sentencingannual.htm

3. National Statistics Office Periodical: Population Trends (No. 130, Winter 2007, .pdf format, 78p.).

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/statbase/Product.asp?vlnk=6303

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

Demographic Research Article: "The anthropological demography of Europe," by Laura Bernardi and Inge Hutter (Vol. 17, Article 18, .pdf format, p. 541-566).

http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol17/18/

Click on the PDF icon for link to full text.

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Population Reference Bureau Periodical, Article:

A. Population Bulletin (Vol. 62, No. 4, December 2007, .pdf format). Note: The theme of the issue is "Immigration and America’s Black Population."

http://www.prb.org/pdf07/62.4immigration.pdf

B. "Pakistan Still Falls Short of Millennium Development Goals for Infant and Maternal Health," by Sandra Yin (December 2007).

http://www.prb.org/Articles/2007/pakistan.aspx

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Urban Institute Report: "Housing in the Nation's Capital 2007," by Margery Austin Turner, G. Thomas Kingsley, Kathryn L.S. Pettit, Mary Kopczynski Winkler, Barika X. Williams (November 2007, .pdf format, 88p.).

http://www.urban.org/publications/411575.html

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National Academies Press Monographs:

A. Ending the Tobacco Problem: A Blueprint for the Nation , edited by Richard J. Bonnie, Kathleen Stratton, and Robert B. Wallace (Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice (BPH)/Institute of Medicine (IOM), 2007, OpenBook format, 716p.). Pricing information on a print or .pdf copy is available at the site.

http://books.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=11795

B. "Parole, Desistance from Crime, and Community Integration" (Committee on Community Supervision and Desistance from Crime, National Research Council, 2007, OpenBook and .pdf format, 102p.). Note: NAP requires free registration before providing a free .pdf copy. Ordering information for a print copy is available at the site.

http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=11988

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University of Chicago Press Book: Pockets of Crime: Broken Windows, Collective Efficacy, and the Criminal Point of View, by Peter K. B. St. Jean (2007, 256p., ISBN: 978-0-226-77498-5, paper: 978-0-226-77499-2). For more information see:

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/hfs.cgi/00/222118.ctl

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International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies Report: "World Disasters Report 2007 - - Focus on Discrimination" (2007, .pdf format, 238p.).

http://www.ifrc.org/Docs/pubs/disasters/wdr2007/WDR2007-English.pdf

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Time Article: "Kidding Ourselves About Immigration," by Michael Kinsley (Dec. 6, 2007).

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1692059,00.html

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WORKING PAPERS:

California Center for Population Research [University of California-Los Angeles]:

A. "Was PostWar Suburbanization 'White Flight'? Evidence from the Black Migration," by Leah Platt Boustan (CCPR-031-07, October 2007, .pdf format, 39p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/ccpr_031_07.asp

B. "Effects of Layoffs and Plant Closings on Depression Among Older Workers," by Jennie E. Brand, Becca R. Ley, and William T. Gallo (CCPR-032-07, August 2007, .pdf format, 27p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/ccprwpabstracts/ccpr_032_07.htm

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Annie E. Casey Foundation: "States Ranked on the Basis of Child Well-Being For Children in Low-Income Families," by Sharon Vandivere, William P. O'Hare, Astrid Atienza, and Kerri L. Rivers (KIDS COUNT, November 2007, .pdf format, 24p.). "In November 2007, the Casey Foundation released a KIDS COUNT Working Paper that ranks all 50 states in terms of the condition of children living in low-income families. The report uses 29 state-level indicators from one year (2003) of two new data sources -- the National Survey of Children's Health and the American Community Survey. This new information is an important look at a target population that is often the focus of public policies to improve the lives of children."

http://www.aecf.org/upload/PublicationFiles/lowincomewellbeing.pdf

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Vienna Institute of Demography: "Developmental Idealism and Family and Demographic Change in Central and Eastern Europe," by Arland Thornton and Dimiter Philipov (European Demographic Research Papers 3, December 2007, .pdf format, 85p.).

Abstract:

In this paper we provide new explanations for the dramatic family and demographic changes in Central and Eastern Europe following the political transformations of the late 1980s and early 1990s. Following these political transformations there were substantial changes in family and demographic beliefs and values, dramatic declines in marriage and childbearing, significant increases in nonmarital cohabitation and childbearing, and a movement from reliance on abortion to a reliance on contraception for fertility limitation. Although many explanations have been offered for these family and demographic trends, we offer a new set of explanations based on ideational influences and the intersection of these ideational influences with structural factors. Our explanations focus on the political, economic, social, and cultural histories of the region, with particular emphasis on how countries in the region have interacted with and been influenced by Western European and North American countries. Our explanations emphasize the importance of developmental models in guiding change in the region, suggesting that developmental idealism influenced family and demographic changes following the political transformations. We argue that developmental idealism states that the model for the future of development for Central/Eastern Europe lies in Western Europe and North America. This ideational system suggests that the political, economic, and family structures of the West are more advanced and superior to those observed elsewhere. It also provides beliefs that modern family systems help to produce modern political and economic accomplishments. And, this ideational system helps to establish the importance of freedom and equality as human rights. The disintegration of the governments and the fall of the iron curtain in the late 1980s and early 1990s brought clear understanding of social, economic, and family circumstances in the West. We suggest that consumption aspirations and expectations increased and clashed not only with old economic realities, but with the dramatic declines in economic circumstances occurring in many places. In addition, the dissolution of the former governments removed or weakened systems supporting the bearing and rearing of children. And, the legitimacy of the former governments and their programs was largely destroyed, removing government support for old norms and patterns of behaviour. In addition, the attacks of previous decades on the religious institutions in the region had in many places left these institutions weak. During this period many openly reached out to embrace the values, living standards, and economic, political, and familial systems of the countries of the West. And, the thirst for freedom-and its considerable expansion-would have operated in personal and familial as well as political and economic realms. These dramatic changes would have combined together to produce the many changes occurring in family and demographic beliefs, values, and behaviour. We offer these explanations, without specifying the relative magnitudes of the forces we have identified or how they may compare in size with influences suggested by others.

http://www.oeaw.ac.at/vid/download/edrp_3_07.pdf

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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "Measurement and Analysis of Child Well-Being in Middle and High Income Countries," by Almas Heshmati, Chemen S.J. Bajalan, and Arno Tausch (Discussion Paper 3203, December 2007, .pdf format, 62p.).

Abstract:

Starting from the recent UNICEF publications on child poverty in the developed countries, which received a wide audience in the political and scientific world, in this paper we further analyze the UNICEF study data base and present three composite indices that are multidimensional and quantitatively measures of child well-being. While the original UNICEF studies simply added together the ranks on different measurement scales, we present a much more sophisticated approach, with the first of our indicators being a non-parametric measure while the remaining two are parametric. In the non-parametric index of child welfare, the well-being indicators are given same weights in their aggregation to form different components from which an overall index is being constructed. Two different forms of the parametric index are estimated by using principal component analysis. The first model uses a pool of all indicators without classification of the indicators by type of well-being, while the second model estimates first the sub-components separately and then uses the share of variance explained by each principal component to compute the weighted average of each component and their aggregation into an index of overall child well-being. The indices indicate which countries have the best system of child welfare and show how child well-being varies across countries and regions. The indices are composed of six well-being components: material, health and safety, educational well-being, family and peer relationships, behaviours and risks and subjective well-being. Each of the components is generated from a number of well-being sub-indicators.

http://ftp.iza.org/dp3203.pdf

B. "Migrant Networks, Migrant Selection, and High School Graduation in Mexico," by Alfonso Miranda (Discussion Paper 3204, December 2007, .pdf format, 34p.).

Abstract:

This paper examines whether family and community migration experience affect the probability of high school graduation in Mexico once unobserved heterogeneity is accounted for. Bivariate random effects dynamic probit models for cluster data are estimated to control for the endogeneity of education and migrant network variables. Correlation of unobservables across migration and education decisions as well as within groups of individuals such as the family are explicitly controlled for. Results show that migrant networks reduce the likelihood of high school graduation. Negative migrant selection is detected at the individual level while positive migrant selection is found at the family level.

http://ftp.iza.org/dp3204.pdf

C. "More Men, More Crime: Evidence from China’s One-Child Policy," by Lena Edlund, Hongbin Li, Junjian Yi, and Junsen Zhang (Discussion Paper 3214, December 2007, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

Crime rates almost doubled in China between 1992 and 2004. Over the same period, sex ratios (males to females) in the crime-prone ages of 16-25 years rose sharply, from 1.053 to 1.093. Although scarcity of females is commonly believed to be a source of male antisocial behavior, a causal link has been difficult to establish. Sex-ratio variation is typically either small or related to social conditions liable to also affect crime rates. This paper exploits two unique features of the Chinese experience: the change in the sex ratio was both large and mainly in response to the implementation of the one-child policy. Using annual province-level data covering the years 1988-2004, we find that a 0.01 increase in the sex ratio raised the violent and property crime rates by some 5-6%, suggesting that the increasing maleness of the young adult population may account for as much as a third of the overall rise in crime.

http://ftp.iza.org/dp3214.pdf

D. "The American High School Graduation Rate: Trends and Levels," by James J. Heckman and Paul A. LaFontaine (Discussion Paper 3216, December 2007, .pdf format, 62p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses multiple data sources and a unified methodology to estimate the trends and levels of the U.S. high school graduation rate. Correcting for important biases that plague previous calculations, we establish that (a) the true high school graduation rate is substantially lower than the official rate issued by the National Center for Educational Statistics; (b) it has been declining over the past 40 years; (c) majority/minority graduation rate differentials are substantial and have not converged over the past 35 years; (d) the decline in high school graduation rates occurs among native populations and is not solely a consequence of increasing proportions of immigrants and minorities in American society; (e) the decline in high school graduation explains part of the recent slowdown in college attendance; and (f) the pattern of the decline of high school graduation rates by gender helps to explain the recent increase in male-female college attendance gaps.

http://ftp.iza.org/dp3216.pdf

E. "Private School Quality in Italy," by Giuseppe Bertola, Daniele Checchi, and Veruska Oppedisano (Discussion Paper 3222, December 2007, .pdf format, 25p.).

Abstract:

We discuss how a schooling system’s structure may imply that private school enrolment leads to worse subsequent performance in further education or in the labour market, and we seek evidence of such phenomena in Italian data. If students differ not only in terms of their families’ ability to pay but also in terms of their own ability to take advantage of educational opportunities ("talent" for short), theory predicts that private schools attract a worse pool of students when publicly funded schools are better suited to foster progress by more talented students. We analyze empirically three surveys of Italian secondary school graduates, interviewed 3 year after graduation. In these data, the impact of observable talent proxies on educational and labour market outcomes is indeed more positive for students who (endogenously) choose to attend public schools than for those who choose to pay for private education.

http://ftp.iza.org/dp3222.pdf

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Center for Economic Studies/Ifo Institute for Economic Research (CESifo) [Munich, Bavaria, Germany]: "Title IX and the Evolution of High School Sports," by Betsey Stevenson (WP 2159, December 2007, .pdf format, 29p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/ifoHome/b-publ/b3publwp/_wp_abstract?p_file_id=14900

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

Demography (Vol. 44, No. 4, November 2007). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/demography/toc/dem44.4.html

Journal of Marriage and the Family (Vol. 69, No. 5, December 2007). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database and the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/toc/jomf/69/5

Population, Space, and Place (Vol. 14, No. 1, January/February 2008).

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/106562735/home

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FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

Population Reference Bureau: "20080-2009 Fellows Program in Population Policy Communications." Application deadline is Feb. 1, 2008. For more information see:

http://www.prb.org/EventsTraining/InternationalTraining/PolicyFellows.aspx

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United Nations Research Institute for Social Development: "Research Fellow." Application deadline is Feb. 1, 2008). For more information see:

http://www.unrisd.org/80256B3C005BF3C2/search/6B140AD8523303F5C1257394003A804D?OpenDocument&cntxt=5EAE3&cookielang=en#top

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University of Guelph [Ontario, Canada] Departments of History and Economics:

Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Economic History, Demography or Humanities Computing

The University of Guelph invites applications for a post-doctoral fellowship in economic history, demography and/or humanities computing. Its terms include pursuit of an individual research program and participation in the University's Scottish and Canadian Census Project. An opportunity to teach may be available. The value of the award is comparable to other national post-doctoral award programs. The appointment is for 12 months and may be renewable for a second year. The University of Guelph is 45 minutes by car from the Toronto International Airport in the centre of Canada's research heartland. The University has considerable strength in rural history, Scottish history, applied econometrics and in resource and environmental economics. Both Economics and History at Guelph offer MA and PhD degrees. The census project is particularly interested in building on these strengths and adding expertise with systematic record linkage.

While it is anticipated that the successful applicant most likely would be appointed to the Department of History and/or Department of Economics, applications will be considered from scholars whose natural home would be Sociology, Geography or elsewhere in the social sciences.

To apply, please send a cv, graduate-level transcripts, and an outline of current research; and arrange for 2 letters of reference to be sent directly to

Kris Inwood,
Departments of Economics and History,
MacKinnon Building,
University of Guelph Guelph,
ON N1G 2W1 Canada

kinwood@uoguelph.ca
(519) 824-4120, ex 53536

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DATA:

National Center for Education Statistics: "Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) Longitudinal 9-Month-Preschool Restricted-Use Data File and Electronic Codebook," by Jennifer Park (NCES 2008034, December 2007).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2008034

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Human Mortality Database: Note: HMD requires free registration before providing data. The following updates have been added to the database.

- Dec. 10, 2007 - Data for Ukraine were revised and updated through 2006

Data availability:

http://www.mortality.org/Public/DataAvailability.html

Data access:

http://www.mortality.org/

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WEBSITES OF INTEREST:

US National Center for Education Statistics: "State Education Reforms Website" has been updated. "The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) has just expanded the State Education Reforms (SER) website. This website was first based on the report "Overview and Inventory of State Education Reforms: 1990 to 2000" and is updated periodically to incorporate new data on state education reform activities.

The SER website, which draws primarily on data collected by organizations other than NCES, compiles and disseminates data on state-level education reform efforts in four areas: 1) standards, assessment, and accountability, 2) school finance reforms, 3) resources for learning, and 4) state support for school choice options. Specific reform areas include student and teacher assessments, adequate yearly progress, statewide exit exams, highly qualified teachers, open enrollments laws, and charter schools.

In the Standards, Assessment, and Accountability area of the website, two tables were updated. Two tables were updated and two new tables were added to the Resources for Learning section. To locate these tables on the State Education Reforms website, please look for the "New!" and "Updated!" tags next to the table titles."

http://nces.ed.gov/programs/statereform/

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BIBLIOGRAPHY UPDATES:

Panel Study Of Income Dynamics Bibliography Update: The University of Michigan Institute for Social Research PSID has recently added the following item to its bibliography. The entire bibliography can be searched or browsed in various ways at:

http://psidonline.isr.umich.edu/Publications/Bibliography/default.aspx

Grafova, Irina. Overweight Children: Assessing the Contribution of the Neighborhood Environment. PAA Annual Meeting; March 29-31, 2007; New York, NY. ; 2007.

Mason, Patrick L. Intergenerational Mobility and Interracial Inequality: The Return to Family Values. Industrial Relations. 2007; 46(1):51-80.

Swanson, Eric T. Real Wage Cyclicality in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Scottish Journal of Political Economy. 2007; 54(5):617-647.

Tijdens, Kea and Dragstra, Anna. How Many Hours Do You Usually Work?: An Analysis of Working Hours Questions in 26 Large-Scale Surveys in Six Countries and the European Union. Time & Society. 2007; 16(1):119-130.

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