Current Social Science Research Report--Social #23, July 10, 2007.

CSSRR-Social is a weekly email report produced by the Data and Information Services Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It seeks to help social science researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/cssrindex.html

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CSSRR-Social is compiled and edited by Jack Solock and Charlie Fiss.

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To CSSRR-Econ #23

To CSSRR- Health #23

CSSRR-Index

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Index to this issue:

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT AND NGO STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

US

NGO AND OTHER COUNTRIES

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

WORKING PAPERS

TABLES OF CONTENTS

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

EMPLOYMENT OPPPORTUNITIES

DATA

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL AND NGO PUBLICATIONS

US:

1. Census Bureau Facts for Features:

A. "Labor Day 2007: Sept. 3," (CB07-FF.13, July 9, 2007, HTML and .pdf format.5p.).

B. "Grandparents Day 2007: Sept. 9," (CB07-FF.12, July 9, 2007, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/index.html

2. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation Report: "Voices of Young Fathers: The Partners for Fragile Families Demonstration Projects," by Alford Young, Jr. and Pamela A. Holcomb (June 2007, .pdf format, 63p.).

http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/07/PFF/voices/index.htm

3. Bureau of Justice Statistics Report: "Census of State and Local Law Enforcement Agencies, 2004," by Brian A. Reaves (NCJ 212749, June 2007, ASCII text and .pdf format, 12p., with .zip compressed spreadsheets).

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/csllea04.htm

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NGO and Other Countries:

United Nations Statistics Division Report: "Millennium Development Goals Report 2007" (July 2007, .pdf format, 21p.).

http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/

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Canada:

Statistics Canada Article: "Gaining and Losing Literacy Skills Over the Lifecourse," by J. Douglas Willms and T. Scott Murray (July 2007, pdf format, 26p.).

http://www.statcan.ca/english/research/89-552-MIE/89-552-MIE2007016.htm

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Hungary:

Central Statistical Office Report: "Data of Book Production: 1997-2006" (July 2007, .pdf format, 58p.). There is an English summary and tables are presented in English and Hungarian.

http://portal.ksh.hu/pls/ksh/docs/hun/xftp/idoszaki/kkiadas/kkiadas9706.pdf

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Netherlands:

Statistics Netherlands Web Magazine Article: "Family with children most common household type," by Elma van Agtmaal-Wobma (Jul. 5, 2007).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/bevolking/publicaties/artikelen/archief/2007/2007-2228-wm.htm

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South Africa:

Statistics South Africa Periodical, Report:

A. Bulletin of Statistics (Vol. 41, No. 2, June 2007, .pdf format, 174p.).

http://www.statssa.gov.za/Publications/statsdownload.asp?PPN=Bulletin&SCH=3946

B. "Mid-year population estimates, 2007" (July 2007, HTML and .pdf format, 11p.).

http://www.statssa.gov.za/publications/statsdownload.asp?PPN=P0302&SCH=3952

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

Urban Institute Report: "Early Care and Education for Children in Low-Income Families: Patterns of Use, Quality, and Potential Policy Implications," by Gina Adams, Martha Zaslow, Kathryn Tout (June 2007, .pdf format, 48p.).

http://www.urban.org/publications/411482.html

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European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research Report: "Intergenerational Transmission of Disadvantages in EU Member States," by Asghar Zaidi, Eszter Zolyomi (June 2007, .pdf format, 15p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.euro.centre.org/detail.php?xml_id=987

More information about ECSWPR:

http://www.euro.centre.org/Organisation_ec.php

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Springer Book: Data Quality and Record Linkage Techniques, by Fritz Scheuren, Thomas Herzog and William Winkler (2007, 234p., ISBN: 978-0-387-69502-0). For more information see:

http://www.springer.com/east/home/computer/database+management+&+information+retrieval?SGWID=5-153-22-173712918-0&teaserId=297299&CENTER_ID=70768

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Science Special Section: Vol. 317, No. 5834, Jul. 6, 2007 contains a special section on "The World of Undergraduate Education." Check your organization's library for electronic full text availability.

http://www.sciencemag.org/current.dtl#special-issue

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WORKING PAPERS:

California Center for Population Research (University of California-Los Angeles): "Testing Efficient Risk Sharing with Heterogeneous Risk Preferences," by Maurizio Mazzocco and Shiv Saini (CCPR-015-07, June 2007, .pdf format, 45p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/ccpr_015_07.asp

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National Bureau of Economic Research:

A. "School Desegregation and Educational Attainment for Blacks," by Sarah J. Reber (w13193, July 2007, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

The desegregation of Southern schools following the Supreme Court's 1954 Brown decision was perhaps the most important innovation in U.S. education policy in the 20th century. This paper assesses the effects of desegregation on its intended beneficiaries, black students. In Louisiana, substantial reductions in segregation between 1965 and 1970 were accompanied by large increases in per-pupil funding. This additional funding was used to "level up" school spending in integrated schools to the level previously experienced only in the white schools. The effects of desegregation on the educational experiences of black students differed substantially depending on the black share of enrollment in the district. For historical reasons, blacks in districts with higher black enrollment shares experienced larger increases in funding, compared to their counterparts in lower black enrollment share districts. On the other hand, blacks in high black enrollment share districts saw smaller increases in exposure to whites (who were higher-income). Blacks in high black enrollment share districts experienced larger improvements in educational attainment, suggesting that the increase in funding associated with desegregation was more important than the increased exposure to whites. A simple cost-benefit calculation suggests that the additional school spending was more than offset by higher earnings due to increased educational attainment. Using a different source of variation and methodology, the results of this paper are consistent with earlier work suggesting that desegregation improved educational attainment for blacks and sheds new light on the potential mechanism behind this improvement in Louisiana: increased funding for blacks' schools.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W13193

B. "Extreme Weather Events, Mortality and Migration," by Olivier Deschenes and Enrico Moretti (w13227, July 2007, .pdf format, 32p.).

Abstract:

We estimate the effect of extreme weather on life expectancy in the US. Using high frequency mortality data, we find that both extreme heat and extreme cold result in immediate increases in mortality. However, the increase in mortality following extreme heat appears entirely driven by temporal displacement, while the increase in mortality following extreme cold is long lasting. The aggregate effect of cold on mortality is quantitatively large. We estimate that the number of annual deaths attributable to cold temperature is 27,940 or 1.3% of total deaths in the US. This effect is even larger in low income areas. Because the U.S. population has been moving from cold Northeastern states to the warmer Southwestern states, our findings have implications for understanding the causes of long-term increases in life expectancy. We calculate that every year, 5,400 deaths are delayed by changes in exposure to cold temperature induced by mobility. These longevity gains associated with long term trends in geographical mobility account for 8%-15% of the total gains in life expectancy experienced by the US population over the past 30 years. Thus mobility is an important but previously overlooked determinant of increased longevity in the United States. We also find that the probability of moving to a state that has fewer days of extreme cold is higher for the age groups that are predicted to benefit more in terms of lower mortality compared to the age groups that are predicted to benefit less.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W13227

C. "Older and Wiser? Birth Order and IQ of Young Men," by Sandra E. Black, Paul J. Devereux and Kjell G. Salvanes (w13237, July 2007, .pdf format, 25p.).

Abstract:

While recent research finds strong evidence that birth order affects children's outcomes such as education and earnings, the evidence on the effects of birth order on IQ is decidedly mixed. This paper uses a large dataset on the population of Norway that allows us to precisely measure birth order effects on IQ using both cross-sectional and within-family methods. Importantly, irrespective of method, we find a strong and significant effect of birth order on IQ, and our results suggest that earlier born children have higher IQs. Our preferred estimates suggest differences between first-borns and second-borns of about one fifth of a standard deviation or approximately 3 IQ points. Despite these large average effects, birth order only explains about 3% of the within-family variance of IQ. When we control for birth endowments, the estimated birth order effects increase. Thus, our analysis suggests that birth order effects are not biologically determined. Also, there is no evidence that birth order effects occur because later-born children are more affected by family breakdown.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w13237

D. "Why are Immigrants' Incarceration Rates so Low? Evidence on Selective Immigration, Deterrence, and Deportation," by Kristin F. Butcher, and Anne Morrison Piehl (w13229, July 2007, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

The perception that immigration adversely affects crime rates led to legislation in the 1990s that particularly increased punishment of criminal aliens. In fact, immigrants have much lower institutionalization (incarceration) rates than the native born - on the order of one-fifth the rate of natives. More recently arrived immigrants have the lowest relative incarceration rates, and this difference increased from 1980 to 2000. We examine whether the improvement in immigrants' relative incarceration rates over the last three decades is linked to increased deportation, immigrant self-selection, or deterrence. Our evidence suggests that deportation does not drive the results. Rather, the process of migration selects individuals who either have lower criminal propensities or are more responsive to deterrent effects than the average native. Immigrants who were already in the country reduced their relative institutionalization probability over the decades; and the newly arrived immigrants in the 1980s and 1990s seem to be particularly unlikely to be involved in criminal activity, consistent with increasingly positive selection along this dimension.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w13229

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Princeton University Research Program in Development Studies: "Using Census and Survey Data to Estimate Poverty and Inequality for Small Areas," by Alessandro Tarozzi and Angus Deaton (June 2007, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

Household expenditure survey data cannot yield precise estimates of poverty or inequality for small areas for which no or few observations are available. Census data are more plentiful, but typically exclude income and expenditure data. Recent years have seen a widespread use small-area "poverty maps" based on census data enriched by relationships estimated from household surveys that predict variables not covered by the census. These methods are used to estimate putatively precise estimates of poverty and inequality for areas as small as 20,000 households. In this paper we argue that to usefully match survey and census data in this way requires a degree of spatial homogeneity for which the method provides no basis, and which is unlikely to be satisfied in practice. The relationships that are used to bridge the surveys and censuses are not structural but are projections of missing variables on a subset of those variables that happen to be common to the survey and the census supplemented by local census means appended to the survey. As such, the coefficients of the projections will generally vary from area to area in response to variables that are not included in the analysis. Estimates of poverty and inequality that assume homogeneity will generally be inconsistent in the presence of spatial heterogeneity, and error variances calculated on the assumption of homogeneity will underestimate mean squared errors and overestimate the coverage of calculated confidence intervals. We use data from the 2000 census of Mexico to construct synthetic "household surveys" and to simulate the poverty mapping process using a robust method of estimation; our simulations show that while the poverty maps contain useful information, their nominal confidence intervals give a misleading idea of precision.

http://www.princeton.edu/~rpds/downloads/tarozzi_deaton_small_areas_final.pdf

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World Bank Policy Research Programme: ""Migration, remittances, poverty, and human capital : conceptual and empirical challenges," by David McKenzie and Marcin J. Sasin (Policy Research Working Paper No. WPS 4272, July 2007, ASCII text and .pdf format, 16p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://econ.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64165259&theSitePK=469372&piPK=64165421&menuPK=64166322&entityID=000016406_20070706153903

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Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development:

A. "Linkages Between Performance and Institutions in the Primary and Secondary Education Sector," by Douglas Sutherland and Robert Price (Economics Department Working Papers No. 558, June 2007, .pdf and Microsoft Word format, 46p.).

Abstract:

The efficiency of schools diverges dramatically across countries in the OECD and can also vary markedly within countries. These differences in levels of efficiency can be traced to policy and institutional settings. As such, moving to best practice could boost educational attainment and reduce pressure on budgetary resources. This paper assesses empirically the relationship between institutional and policy settings and the efficiency of public spending on primary and secondary education across OECD countries. The analysis builds on two previous papers, which respectively developed OECD-area indicators of educational efficiency based on PISA score data and institutional indicators based on questionnaire responses. The results identify a number of institutional and policy settings that appear conducive to raising efficiency, as well as policies that appear to be detrimental to achieving higher levels of efficiency.

http://www.olis.oecd.org/olis/2007doc.nsf/linkto/eco-wkp(2007)18

B. "Integration of immigrants in OECD countries: do policies matter?" by Orsetta Causa and Sébastien Jean (Economics Department Working Papers No. 564, July 2007, .pdf and Word format, 33p.).

Abstract:

This working paper assesses the ease of immigrants' integration in OECD labour markets by estimating how an immigration background influences the probability of being active or employed and the expected hourly earnings, for given individual characteristics. Applying the same methodology to comparable data across twelve OECD countries, immigrants are shown to significantly lag behind natives in terms of employment and/or wages. The differences narrow as years since settlement elapse, especially as regards wages, reflecting progressive assimilation. Strong differences in immigrant-to-native gaps are also observed across countries, and the paper shows that they may, to a significant extent, be explained by differences in labour market policies, in particular unemployment benefits, the tax wedge and the minimum wage. In addition, immigrants are shown to be over-represented among outsiders in the labour market and, as such, highly sensitive to the difference in employment protection legislation between temporary and permanent contracts.

http://www.olis.oecd.org/olis/2007doc.nsf/linkto/eco-wkp(2007)24

C. "Migration in OECD countries: labour market impact and integration issues," by Sébastien Jean, Orsetta Causa, Miguel Jimenez and Isabelle Wanner (Economics Department Working Papers No. 562, July 2007, .pdf and Microsoft Word format, 50p.).

Abstract:

Immigration pressures are increasing in most OECD countries. This paper investigates the consequences of immigration for natives' labour market outcomes, as well as issues linked to immigrants' integration in the host country labour market. Changes in the share of immigrants in the labour force may have a distributive impact on natives' wages, and a temporary impact on unemployment. However, labour market integration of immigrants (as well as integration of second-generation immigrants - both in terms of educational attainments and of labour market outcomes) remains the main challenge facing host economies. In both cases, product and labour market policies have a significant role to play in easing the economy's adjustment to immigration.

http://www.olis.oecd.org/olis/2007doc.nsf/linkto/eco-wkp(2007)22

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ESRC Research Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) [London (UK) School of Economics]:

A. "Understanding low achievement in English schools," by Geeta Gandhi Kingdon, Robert Cassen (CASE/118, June 2007, .pdf format, 64p.).

B. "Child Support Awards in Britain: An analysis of data from the Families and Children Study," by Stephen Morris (CASE/119, June 2007, .pdf format, April 2007, .pdf format, 34p.).

Links to abstracts and full text for both are available at:

http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/publications/casepapers.asp

Scroll to CASE/118 and CASE/119.

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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "Do Small Classes Reduce the Achievement Gap between Low and High Achievers? Evidence from Project STAR," by Spyros Konstantopoulos (Discussion Paper 2904, July 2007, .pdf format, 46p.).

Abstract:

Given that previous findings on the social distribution of the effects of small classes have been mixed and inconclusive, in the present study I attempted to shed light on the mechanism through which small classes affect the achievement of low- and high-achieving students. I used data from a 4-year large-scale randomized experiment (project STAR) to examine the effects of small classes on the achievement gap. The sample consisted of nearly 11,000 elementary school students who participated in the experiment from kindergarten to grade 3. Meta-analysis and quantile regression methods were employed to examine the effects of small classes on the achievement gap in mathematics and reading SAT scores. The results consistently indicated that higher-achieving students benefited more from being in small classes in early grades than other students. The findings also indicated that although all types of students benefited from being in small classes, reductions in class size did not reduce the achievement gap between low and high achievers.

http://ftp.iza.org/dp2904.pdf

B. "Human Capital, Mortality and Fertility: A Unified Theory of the Economic and Demographic Transition," by Matteo Cervellati and Uwe Sunde (Discussion Paper 2905, July 2007, .pdf format, 52p.).

Abstract:

This paper provides a unified theory of the economic and demographic transition. Individuals make optimal decisions about fertility, education of their children and the type and intensity of the investments in their own education. These decisions are affected by different dimensions of mortality and technological progress which change endogenously during the process of development. The model generates an endogenous transition from a regime characterized by limited human capital formation, little longevity, high child mortality, large fertility and a sluggish income and productivity growth to a modern growth regime in which lower net fertility is associated with the acquisition of human capital and improved living standards. Unlike previous models, the framework emphasizes the education composition of the population in terms of the equilibrium share of educated individuals, and differential fertility related to education. The framework explores the roles of different dimensions of mortality, wages and schooling in triggering the transition. The dynamics of the model are consistent with empirical observations and stylized facts that have been difficult to reconcile so far. For illustration we simulate the model and discuss the novel predictions using historical and cross-country data.

http://ftp.iza.org/dp2905.pdf

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

American Journal of Sociology (Vol. 113, No. 1, July 2007). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJS/journal/contents/v113n1.html

Cities (Vol. 24, No. 4, August 2007).

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/02642751

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FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation: "Announcement of the Availability of Funds and Request for Applications for a Cooperative Agreement(s) to Establish a National Center for Marriage Research," closing date August 2, 2007 (HS-07-030).

http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/news/07MarriageCenter.htm

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

American Educational Research Association: AERA has updated its jobs listings to include items from Jun. 20-Jul. 9 2007).

http://careers.aera.net/c/search_results.cfm?site_id=557

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DATA:

US National Center for Education Research:

A. "Observations of Mother-Twin Interactions at 9 Months: User's Manual for the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) 9-month Twin Triad Restricted-Use Data File" (NCES 2007047, June 2007, information on applying for a restricted data license is available at the site).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2007047

B. "Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) 9-Month Twin Triad Restricted-Use Data File" (NCES 2007032, June 2007, information on applying for a restricted data license is available at the site).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2007032

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Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at he University of Michigan released a new dataset: "National Firearms Survey, 1999" (#4552) on Jul. 9, 2007, which may be of interest to Sociology researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

New and updated data:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/org/announce.html

All new and updated data in the last 90 days can be found at:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/access/recent.html

Click on "list".

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UK Data Archive (Essex University, Colchester, UK): The UK Data Archive has recently added the following datasets to its holdings. Note: There maybe charges or licensing requirements on holdings of the UK Data Archive. For more information see:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/

SN 5670 -ONS Omnibus Survey, Internet Access Module, May, July and October, 2005

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5670

SN 5473 -Changing Faces of Adult Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL: a Critical History of Policy and Practice, 1970-2000

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5473

SN 5602 -Taking Control? Agency in Young Adult Transitions in England and the 'New' Germany, 1999

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5602

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