Current Social Science Research Report--Sociology #109, April 21, 2009.

CSSRR-Social is a weekly email report produced by the Data and Information Services Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It seeks to help social science researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/cssrindex.html

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CSSRR-Social is compiled and edited by Jack Solock and Charlie Fiss.

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To CSSRR-Econ #109

To CSSRR-Health #109

CSSRR-Index

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Index to this issue:

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT AND NGO STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

US

US STATES

NGO AND OTHER COUNTRIES

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

WORKING PAPERS

TABLES OF CONTENTS

CONFERENCES

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

DATA

WEBSITES OF INTEREST

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL AND NGO PUBLICATIONS

US:

1. National Center for Education Statistics Reports:

A. "National Household Education Surveys Program of 2007: Methodology Report," by Mary Hagedorn, Shelley Brock Roth, Priscilla R. Carver, Wendy Van de Kerckhove, Susan Smith, and Chris Chapman (NCES 2009047, March 2009, .pdf format, 156p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2009047

B. "An Evaluation of Bias in the 2007 National Households Education Surveys Program: Results From a Special Data Collection Effort," by Wendy Van de Kerckhove, Jill M. Montaquila, Priscilla R. Carver, J. Michael Brick, and Chris Chapman (NCES 2009029, March 2009, .pdf format, 180p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2009029

C. "Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2008," by Rachel Dinks, Jana Kemp, and Katrina Baum (NCES 2009022, April 2009, .pdf format, 149p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2009022

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US States:

Oregon:

Department of Human Services Report: "Client Caseload Forecasts: Spring 2009 Forecast" (2009, .pdf format, 113p.).

http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/data/forecasts/2009/spring_detail.pdf

Summary: (2009, .pdf format, 22p.).

http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/data/forecasts/2009/spring_09_01.pdf

Washington:

State Office of Financial Management Report: "Participation in Recreation and Culture in Washington State," by Erica Gardner (April 2009, .pdf format, 6p.).

http://www.ofm.wa.gov/researchbriefs/2009/brief054.pdf

Wisconsin:

Department of Health Services Report: "Wisconsin Marriages and Divorces, 2008" (April 2009, .pdf format, 15p.).

http://dhs.wisconsin.gov/stats/marriages.htm

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NGO and Other Countries:

United Nations:

Department of Economic and Social Affairs Compendium: International Migration Report 2006: A Global Assessment (April 2009, .pdf and .zip compressed .pdf format, 343p.).

http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/2006_MigrationRep/report.htm

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Botswana:

Central Statistics Office Statistical Brief: "Botswana- Causes Of Death" (March 2009, .pdf format, 6p.).

http://www.cso.gov.bw/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=264&Itemid=2

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Finland:

Statistics Finland News Release: "University students numbered 164,100 in 2008" (Apr. 20, 2009).

http://www.stat.fi/til/yop/2008/yop_2008_2009-04-20_tie_001_en.html

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Israel:

Central Bureau of Statistics Report: "Survey of Recipients of a First Degree from Institutions of Higher Education 2003/04" (April 2009, .pdf format, 95p., with tables in compressed and uncompressed Microsoft Excel format, and ancillary information in Microsoft Word format). The report is in Hebrew and English.

http://www1.cbs.gov.il/webpub/pub/text_page_eng.html?publ=17&CYear=2004&CMonth=1

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Japan:

Statistics Bureau Report: "Current Population Estimates as of October 1, 2008" (April 2009, HTML and Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.stat.go.jp/english/data/jinsui/2008np/index.htm

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Norway:

Statistics Norway News Releases: Statistics Norway News Releases: SN has updated its news releases from Apr. 15-21, 2009).

http://www.ssb.no/english/previous14days/

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Romania:

National Institute of Statistics Press Release: "Population and demographic phenomena in February 2009" (Apr. 15, 2009, .pdf format, 2p.).

http://www.insse.ro/cms/files/statistici/comunicate/populatie/a09/pop02e09.pdf

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Slovenia:

Statistical Office News Release: "Student Enrolment in Tertiary Education in the Academic Year 2008/09--Final Data," byUrska Arsenjuk (Apr. 20, 2009).

http://www.stat.si/eng/novica_prikazi.aspx?id=2296

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UK:

National Statistics Office Periodical: Social Trends, edited by Matthew Hughes (No. 39, 2009, April 2009, .pdf format, 252p.).

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Product.asp?vlnk=13675

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.:

Allen Guttmacher Institute Brief: "Meeting Women’s Contraceptive Needs in the Philippines," (Brief No. 1, April 2009, .pdf format, 8p.).

http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/2009/04/15/IB_MWCNP.pdf

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Center on Budget and Policy Priorities Report: "Additional Housing Vouchers Needed to Stem Increase in Homelessness," by Douglas Rice (April 2009, HTML and .pdf format, 5p.).

http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2786

More information on CBPP:

http://www.cbpp.org/about/

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Manhattan Institute Report: "The NYC Teacher Pay-for-Performance Program: Early Evidence from a Randomized Trial," by Matthew G. Springer and Marcus A. Winters (April 2009, HTML and .pdf format, 39p.).

http://www.manhattan-institute.org/html/cr_56.htm

More information about MI:

http://www.manhattan-institute.org/html/about_mi_30.htm

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MDRC (Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation) Report: "Toward Growth and Equality: A Framework for Monitoring Outcomes for Residents and Housing Markets in Camden and the South Jersey Region," by David C. Seith and Zawadi Rucks (April 2009, .pdf format, 72p.).

http://www.mdrc.org/publications/515/overview.html

More information about MDRC:

http://www.mdrc.org/about.htm

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Pew Hispanic Center Report: "A Portrait of Unauthorized Immigrants in the United States," by Jeffrey S. Passel, Senior Demographer, Pew Hispanic Center, and D'Vera Cohn (April 2009, .pdf format, 42p.).

http://pewhispanic.org/reports/report.php?ReportID=107

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Demographic Research Articles:

A. "The decline of son preference and rise of gender indifference in Taiwan since 1990," by Tin-chi Lin (Vol. 20, Article 16, .pdf format, p. 377-402). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.demographic-research.org/Volumes/Vol20/16/default.htm

B. "Poverty and living arrangements among youth in Spain, 1980-2005," by Sara Ayllón (Vol. 20, Article 17, April 2009, .pdf format, p. 403-434). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.demographic-research.org/Volumes/Vol20/17/default.htm

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Korea Institute for International Economic Policy Report: "Development Cooperation for Social Safety Nets in East and Southeast Asia," by Kye Woo Lee (March 2009, .pdf format, 60p.). Part 1 of Chapter 3: "Demographic Transition in Developing Countries" is titled "Global Ageing Trend."

http://www.kiep.go.kr/eng/std_data_view.asp?num=183683&sCate=013002&sSubCate=&lTp=r&nowPage=1&listCnt=10#

Click on "PDF" for link to full text.

More information about KIEP:

http://www.kiep.go.kr/eng/welcome.asp

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Article Abstract, Article:

A. "Early modern human diversity suggests subdivided population structure and a complex out-of-Africa scenario," by Philipp Gunza, Fred L. Booksteina, Philipp Mitteroeckera, Andrea Stadlmayra, Horst Seidlera, and Gerhard W. Webera (Vol. 106, No. 15, Apr. 14, 2009, p. 6094-6098).

http://www.pnas.org/content/106/15/6094.abstract?etoc

B. "Dynamic remodeling of in-group bias during the 2008 presidential election," by David G. Rand, Thomas Pfeiffer, Anna Dreber, Rachel W. Sheketoff, Nils C. Wernerfelt, and Yochai Benkler (Vol. 106, No. 15, April 15, 2009, HTML and .pdf format, p. 6187-6191). This article is available free of charge.

http://www.pnas.org/content/106/15/6187.full

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British Medical Journal Observations Extract: "The anthroposphere is changing," by Nicholas A. Christakis (BMJ 2009;338:b1534, Apr. 15, 2009).

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/extract/338/apr15_1/b1534

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WORKING PAPERS:

University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty:

A. "Long-Term Effects of Public Low-Income Housing Vouchers on Labor Market Outcomes," by Deven Carlson, Robert Haveman, Tom Kaplan, and Barbara Wolfe (DP 1363-09, April 2009, .pdf format, 46p.).

Abstract:

The federal Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) Program provides eligible low-income families with an income-conditioned voucher that pays for a portion of rental costs in privately owned, affordable housing units. This paper extends prior research on the effectiveness of rental support programs in several ways. The analysis employs a unique longitudinal dataset created by combining administrative records maintained by the State of Wisconsin with census block group data. We use a propensity score matching approach coupled with difference-in-differences regression analysis to estimate the effect of housing voucher receipt on the employment and earnings of voucher recipients; we track these effects for five years following voucher receipt. Our results indicate that voucher receipt has a generally positive effect on employment, but a negative impact on earnings. The negative earnings effect is largest in the years following initial receipt of the rental voucher, and dissipates over time. We find that the pattern of recipient labor market responses to voucher receipt differs substantially among demographic subgroups. In addition to our overall results, we present sensitivity results involving alternative estimation methods, as well as distinctions between those who receive transitory voucher support and those who are long-term recipients.

http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp136309.pdf

B. "Changing Poverty and Changing Antipoverty Policies," by Maria Cancian and Sheldon Danziger (DP 1364-09, April 2009, .pdf format, 41p.).

Abstract:

Since the early 1970s, dramatic changes in the economy, demographic composition of the population, and in public policies have combined to reduce the antipoverty effects of economic growth. Because economic growth is now necessary, but not sufficient, to significantly reduce poverty, antipoverty policies must be expanded and reformed, especially in the aftermath of the severe recession that began in late 2007.

The authors review three cross-cutting factors that shape the extent and nature of poverty and prospects for reducing poverty: the changing role of race and ethnicity in the labor market and society; changing gender roles that influence both trends in labor force participation of women and patterns of family formation and childbearing; and the recent history of social welfare programs and policies. They conclude by recommending a set of high priority antipoverty policies that are consistent with current trends in work effort, patterns of family formation, and continuing changes in how the globalized economy affects the employment and earnings prospects of less-educated workers. These policies focus on making work pay, helping parents balance work and family responsibilities, and raising the educational attainment of disadvantaged children. The authors also briefly summarize the other chapters in the forthcoming Changing Poverty volume.

http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp136409.pdf

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National Bureau of Economic Research: "Sixty Years after the Magic Carpet Ride: The Long-Run Effect of the Early Childhood Environment on Social and Economic Outcomes," by Eric D. Gould, Victor Lavy, and M. Daniele Paserman (w14884, April 2009, .pdf format, 56p.).

Abstract:

This paper estimates the effect of the childhood environment on a large array of social and economic outcomes lasting almost 60 years, for both the affected cohorts and for their children. To do this, we exploit a natural experiment provided by the 1949 Magic Carpet operation, where over 50,000 Yemenite immigrants were airlifted to Israel. The Yemenites, who lacked any formal schooling or knowledge of a western-style culture or bureaucracy, believed that they were being "redeemed," and put their trust in the Israeli authorities to make decisions about where they should go and what they should do. As a result, they were scattered across the country in essentially a random fashion, and as we show, the environmental conditions faced by immigrant children were not correlated with other factors that affected the long-term outcomes of individuals. We construct three summary measures of the childhood environment: 1) whether the home had running water, sanitation and electricity; 2) whether the locality of residence was in an urban environment with a good economic infrastructure; and 3) whether the locality of residence was a Yemenite enclave. We find that children who were placed in a good environment (a home with good sanitary conditions, in a city, and outside of an ethnic enclave) were more likely to achieve positive long-term outcomes. They were more likely to obtain higher education, marry at an older age, have fewer children, work at age 55, be more assimilated into Israeli society, be less religious, and have more worldly tastes in music and food. These effects are much more pronounced for women than for men. We find weaker and somewhat mixed effects on health outcomes, and no effect on political views. We do find an effect on the next generation--children who lived in a better environment grew up to have children who achieved higher educational attainment.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w14884

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Urban Institute National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research:

A. "Status vs. Growth: The Distributional Effects of School Accountability Policies," by Helen F. Ladd and Douglas L. Lauen (Working Paper No. 21, March 2009, .pdf format, 50p.).

Abstract:

Although the federal No Child Left Behind program judges the effectiveness of schools based on their students’ achievement status, many policy analysts argue that schools should be measured, instead, by their students’ achievement growth. Using a ten-year student-level panel dataset from North Carolina, we examine how school-specific pressure associated with the two approaches to school accountability affects student achievement at different points in the prior-year achievement distribution. Achievement gains for students below the proficiency cut point emerge in response to both types of accountability systems. In contrast to prior research highlighting the possibility of educational triage, we find little or no evidence that schools in North Carolina ignore the students far below proficiency under either approach. Importantly, we find that the status, but not the growth, approach reduces the reading achievement of higher performing students, with the losses in the aggregate exceeding the gains at the bottom. Our analysis suggests that the distributional effects of accountability pressure depend not only on the type of pressure for which schools are held accountable (status or growth), but also the tested subject.

http://www.caldercenter.org/PDF/1001260_status_vs_growth.pdf

B. "Teacher Preparation and Student Achievement," by Donald Boyd, Pamela Grossman, Hamilton Lankford, Susanna Loeb, and James Wyckoff (Working Paper No. 20, March 2009, .pdf format, 42p.).

Abstract:

There are fierce debates over the best way to prepare teachers. Some argue that easing entry into teaching is necessary to attract strong candidates, while others argue that investing in high quality teacher preparation is the most promising approach. Most agree, however, that we lack a strong research basis for understanding how to prepare teachers. This paper is one of the first to estimate the effects of features of teachers' preparation on teachers' value-added to student test score performance in Math and English Language Arts. Our results indicate variation across preparation programs in the average effectiveness of the teachers they are supplying to New York City schools. In particular, preparation directly linked to practice appears to benefit teachers in their first year.

http://www.caldercenter.org/PDF/1001255_teacher_preparation.pdf

C. "Student Transience in North Carolina: The Effect of School Mobility on Student Outcomes Using Longitudinal Data," by Zeyu Xu, Jane Hannaway, and Stephanie D’Souza (Working Paper No. 22, March 2009, .pdf format, p.).

Abstract:

This paper describes the school mobility rates for elementary and middle school students in North Carolina and attempts to estimate the effect of school mobility on the performance of different groups of students using student fixed effects models. School mobility is defined as changing schools at times that are non-promotional (e.g., moving from middle to high school). We used detailed administrative data on North Carolina students and schools from 1997 to 2005 and followed four cohorts of 3rd graders for six years each. School mobility rates were highest for minority and disadvantaged students. School mobility rates for Hispanic students declined across successive cohorts, but increased for Black students. Findings on effects were most pronounced in math. School mobility hurt the math performance of Black and Hispanic students, but not the math performance of white students. School mobility improved the reading performance of white and more advantaged students, but had no effect on the reading performance of minority students. "Strategic" school moves (cross-district) benefited or had no effect on student performance, but "reactive" moves (within district) hurt all groups of students. White and Hispanic students were more likely to move to a higher quality school while Blacks were more likely to move to a lower quality school. The negative effects of school mobility increased with the number of school moves.

http://www.caldercenter.org/PDF/1001256_student_transience.pdf

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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research: "Is Poland really 'immune' to the spread of cohabitation?" by Anna Matysiak (WP-2009-012, April 2009, .pdf format, 16p.).

Abstract:

Various data have constantly pointed out a low incidence of non-marital unions in Poland (at 1.4-4.9% among all unions). In this paper we demonstrate that these data, coming exclusively from cross-sectional surveys, clearly underestimate the scale of the phenomenon. By exploiting data on partnership histories we show that young Poles have been increasingly opting for cohabitation. Consequently, in the years 2004-2006 entries to cohabitation constituted about one third of all first union entries. Consensual unions are more widespread among the low social strata, but recently a clear increase in cohabitation has been observed also among the highly educated. Although the estimates of cohabitation incidence are far below those observed in Northern and Western Europe, our study suggests that Poland is not as ‘immune’ to the spread of consensual unions as it is commonly believed.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2009-012.pdf

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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: "Gender Interactions within Hierarchies: Evidence from the Political Arena," by Stefano Gagliarducci and Daniele Paserman (Discussion Paper 4128, April 2009, .pdf format, 54p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.iza.org/index_html?lang=en&mainframe=http%3A//www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/papers/viewAbstract%3Fdp_id%3D4128

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

Journal of Marriage and the Family (Vol. 71, No. 2, May 2009). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118493332/home

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CONFERENCES:

Intute: Social Sciences: Intute has updated it's Sociology conferences page with new conferences:

Mapping the Genomic Era Measurements and Meanings Conference (Cardiff City Hall, Cardiff, Oct. 7, 2009).

International Conference on Social Science and Humanities (ICSSH 2009) Conference (Singapore, Oct. 9, 2009).

http://www.intute.ac.uk/socialsciences/cgi-bin/conferences.pl?term=&type=Conference&subject=120684

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

American Educational Research Association: AERA has updated its employment page with listings through Apr. 21, 2009.

http://careers.aera.net/c/search_results.cfm?site_id=557

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American Statistical Association: ASA has updated its employment page with listings through Apr. 21, 2009.

http://jobs.amstat.org/search/results

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Chronicle of Higher Education:

Sociology positions has been updated through Apr. 21, 2009.

http://chronicle.com/jobs/100/800/8000

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DATA:

National Center on Education Statistics: "2005-06 School Survey on Crime and Safety Public-Use Data File Codebook," by Erin C. Wallace, Samantha Neiman, Kevin M. Foster, and Xiaodong Guan (NCES 2009312, April 2009, .pdf format, 162p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2009312

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UK Data Archive (Essex University, Colchester, UK): The UK Data Archive has recently added the following datasets to its holdings. Note: There maybe charges or licensing requirements on holdings of the UK Data Archive. For more information see:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/

For new data or new editions of new data in the last month:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/newdata.asp

and pick "1 month" for either.

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WEBSITES OF INTEREST:

US National Center for Education Statistics Datalab Update: NCES Datalab has added "QuickStats to its suite of interactive web based data extraction services. "QuickStats allows public access for data consumers -- such as policy makers, legislative staff, journalists, students, and others -- to answer questions using data collected by NCES. Users can easily create tables by selecting from a list of datasets, then selecting variables contained within as column and row categories, employing a simple drag-and-drop process. Once the tables are produced, they can choose to view their results in bar graph form, downloads into MS Excel, create a printer layout, or save them by generating a unique table ID for quick retrieval."

http://nces.ed.gov/datalab/

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University of Wisconsin Data and Information Service Center Country Statistical Yearbook Update. Our Country Statistical Yearbook page has added links to several yearbooks. Note: check carefully to see if the link is to a hypertext or .pdf yearbook, or information about a print one, as well as the language of the yearbook. Our Country Statistical Yearbook page now points to compendia for 111 countries.

http://researchguides.library.wisc.edu/yearbooks

Updates:

Andorra: Statistical Abstract 2009

Belarus: Belarus in Figures: 2009

China: The Collection of Statistics on China Economy and Social Development, 2008-2009 (print only)

Czech Republic: Czech Republic in International Comparison 2008 (selected indicators)

Israel: Israel in Figures: 2008

Mongolia: Statistical Yearbooks, 2004, 2005

Qatar: Statistical Abstract: 2007, 2008

Sri Lanka: Statistical Abstract: 2008

Switzerland: Statistical Yearbook of Switzerland 2009 (German and French); Statistical Data on Switzerland 2009

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