Current Demographic Research Report #9, December 2, 2003.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Report
National Center for Education Statistics Report
Bureau of Labor Statistics News Releases, Periodical
Centers for Disease Control Articles, Surveillance Summary
US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Reports
National Science Foundation Report
United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization Report
World Health Organization/UNAIDS Report
Urban Institute Report
Allen Guttmacher Institute Report
Info Health Pop. Reporter

WORKING PAPERS

University of Michigan Population Studies Center
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
National Bureau of Economic Research

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta
Other Journals

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

National Institutes of Health

DATA

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive

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REPORTS, ARTICLES, NEWS RELEASES, PERIODICALS

Census Bureau Report: "Custodial Mothers and Fathers and Their Child Support: 2001," by Timothy S. Grall (Consumer Income, P60-225, October 2003, .pdf format, 9p.). The report is linked to from a Census Bureau news release: "About Half of Custodial Parents Got Full Child Support Payments in 2001, Census Bureau Reports" (CB03-180, Dec. 2, 2003).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/families_households/001575.html

Click on "Custodial Mothers and Fathers and Their Child Support: 2001" for link to full text.
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National Center for Education Statistics Report: "Remedial Education at Degree-Granting Postsecondary Institutions in Fall 2000," by Basmat Parsad and Laurie Lewis (NCES 2004010, November 2003, .pdf format, 95p.).

Abstract:

This report provides national estimates on the prevalence and characteristics of remedial courses and enrollments in degree-granting institutions in fall 2000 and changes from fall 1995. The report compares data from the 1995 and 2000 surveys on remedial course offerings, student participation in remedial programs, institutional structure of remedial programs, and the delivery of remedial courses through distance education. It also examines two additional issues in fall 2000: types of technology used in the delivery of remedial education through distance education courses, and the use of computers as a hands-on instructional tool for on-campus remedial education.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2004010
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Bureau of Labor Statistics News Releases, Periodical:

A. "Occupational Employment and Wages, 2002" (Nov. 19, 2003, HTML and .pdf format, 18p.).

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/ocwage.toc.htm

B. "Job Openings and Labor Turnover Estimates: August 2002 - August 2003" (Oct. 30, 2003).

http://www.bls.gov/jlt/jlttoc_0803.htm

C. "Compensation and Working Conditions Online." This periodical has been updated with two articles on Nov. 24, 2003.

http://www.bls.gov/opub/cwc/home.htm
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Centers for Disease Control Articles, Surveillance Summary:

A. "Increases in HIV Diagnoses --- 29 States, 1999--2002" (_Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_ Vol. 52, No. 47, Nov. 28, 2003, p. 1145-1148, HTML and .pdf format).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5247a2.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5247.pdf

B. "Health Status of American Indians Compared with Other Racial/Ethnic Minority Populations --- Selected States, 2001--2002" (_Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_ Vol. 52, No. 47, Nov. 28, 2003, p. 1148-1152, HTML and .pdf format).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5247a3.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5247.pdf

C. "Abortion Surveillance --- United States, 2000," by Laurie D. Elam-Evans, Lilo T. Strauss, Joy Herndon, Wilda Y. Parker, Sonya V. Bowens, Suzanne Zane, and Cynthia J. Berg (_Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_ Surveillance Summary Vol. 52, No. SS12, Nov. 28, 2003, HTML and .pdf format, p. 1-32).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5212a1.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/ss/ss5212.pdf
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US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Reports:

A. "Employment Factors Influencing Food Stamp Program Participation: Final Report," by Signe-Mary McKernan and Caroline Ratcliffe (E-FAN No. 03-012, November 2003, .pdf format, 57p.).

Abstract:

This study examines how employment characteristics of low-income households influence Food Stamp Program (FSP) participation. The relationship between employment and FSP participation is of special interest because, although more low-income working families are eligible to participate, many do not. Low-income working households are less likely to participate in the FSP if they work traditional daytime hours, hold multiple jobs, and work more hours, but they are more likely to participate if they frequently change jobs. However, the relationship between employment and FSP participation was stronger in the early 1990s than in the late 1990s, suggesting that barriers to participation among working families decreased during the decade.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/efan03012/

B. "Rural America at a Glance," edited by Karen Hamrick (Rural Development Research Report RDRR97-1, September 2003, .pdf format, 6p.).

Abstract:

Rural America At A Glance is a six-page brochure that highlights the most recent indicators of social and economic conditions in rural areas for use in developing policies and programs to assist rural areas. This brochure is the second in a series of reports that uses current social and economic data to highlight important population, labor market, income, and poverty trends in rural areas. The new metropolitan/nonmetropolitan classification is also discussed. The format of the report incorporates text bullets with charts and maps to make the report easy-to-read and visually interesting. This brochure provides information on key rural conditions and trends for use by public and private decision makers and others in efforts to enhance the economic opportunities and quality of life for rural people and their communities.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/rdrr97-1/
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National Science Foundation Report: "Characteristics of Recent Science and Engineering Graduates: 2001" (NSF 04-302, December 2003, .pdf and Microsoft Excel format, 236p.).

http://www.nsf.gov/sbe/srs/nsf04302/start.htm

Note: "Hypertext format" links to detailed Excel tables.
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United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization Report: "The State of Food Insecurity in the World: 2003" (November 2003, .pdf format, 35p.).

http://www.fao.org/docrep/006/j0083e/j0083e00.htm
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World Health Organization/Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) Report: "AIDS Epidemic Update 2003" (December 2003, HTML and .pdf format, 48p.).

http://www.unaids.org/wad/2003/press/Epiupdate.html

World Health Organization Press Release:

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/releases/2003/prunaids/en/
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Urban Institute Report: "Many Families Turn to Food Pantries for Help," by Sheila R. Zedlewski and Sandi Nelson (Snapshots of America's Families III No. 17, November 2003, .pdf format, HTML and .pdf format, 2p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=310895
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Allen Guttmacher Institute Report: "A, B and C in Uganda: The Roles of Abstinence, Monogamy and Condom Use in HIV Decline," by Susheela Singh, Jacqueline E. Darroch, and Akinrinola Bankole (Occasional Report No. 9, December 2003, .pdf format, 45p.).

http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/or_abc03.pdf
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Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (Vol. 3, No. 48,, Dec. 1, 2003). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

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WORKING PAPERS:

University of Michigan Population Studies Center: "Gender Differences in Economic Support and Well-Being of Older Asians," by Mary Beth Ofstedal, Erin Reidy and John Knodel (PSC Research Report 03-540, November 2003, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract:

This report provides a comprehensive analysis of gender differences in economic support and well-being in eight countries in Southern and Eastern Asia (Bangladesh, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, Philippines, and Taiwan). We examine multiple economic indicators, including sources of income, receipt of financial and material support, income levels, ownership of assets, and subjective well-being. Results show substantial variation in gender differences across indicators and provide an important qualification to widely held views concerning the globally disadvantaged position of older women. Whereas men tend to report higher levels of income than women, there is generally little gender difference in housing characteristics, asset ownership, or reports of subjective economic well-being. Unmarried women are economically advantaged compared to unmarried men in some respects, in part because they are more likely to be embedded in multigenerational households and receive both direct and indirect forms of support from family members.

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.shtml?ID=34474

Click on PDF icon for full text.
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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: "A Meta-Analysis of the International Gender Wage Gap," by Doris Weichselbaumer and Rudolf Winter-Ebmer (Discussion Paper DP-906, October 2003, .pdf format, 31p.).

Abstract:

Since the early seventies, hundreds of authors have calculated gender wage differentials between women and men of equal productivity. Consequently, estimates for the gender wage gap have been published for the most diverse countries at different points in time. This metastudy provides a quantitative review of this vast amount of empirical literature on gender wage discrimination as it concerns differences in methodology, data, countries and time periods. We place particular emphasis on a proper consideration of the quality of the underlying study which is done by a weighting with quality indicators. The results show that data restrictions have the biggest impact on the resulting gender wage gap. Moreover, we are able to show what effect a misspecification of the underlying wage equation -- like the frequent use of potential experience -- has on the calculated gender wage gap. Over time, raw wage differentials world-wide have fallen substantially; however, most of this decrease is due to an increased labor market productivity of females.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp906.pdf
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National Bureau of Economic Research:

A. "The Effect of School Choice on Student Outcomes: Evidence from Randomized Lotteries," by Julie Berry Cullen, Brian A. Jacob, and Steven Levitt (w10113, November 2003, .pdf format, 51p.).

Abstract:

School choice has become an increasingly prominent strategy for urban school districts seeking to enhance academic achievement. Evaluating the impact of such programs is complicated by the fact that a highly select sample of students takes advantage of these programs. To overcome this difficulty, we exploit randomized lotteries that determine high school admission in the Chicago Public Schools. Surprisingly, we find little evidence that attending sought after programs provides any benefit on a wide variety of traditional academic measures, including standardized test scores, attendance rates, course-taking, and credit accumulation. This is true despite the fact that those students who win the lotteries attend better high schools along a number of dimensions, including higher peer achievement levels, higher peer graduation rates, and lower levels of poverty. We do, however, uncover evidence that attendance at such schools may improve a subset of non-traditional outcome measures, such as self-reported disciplinary incidences and arrest rates.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10113

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

B. "What Mean Impacts Miss: Distributional Effects of Welfare Reform Experiments," by Marianne Bitler, Jonah Gelbach, and Hilary Hoynes (w10121, November 2003, .pdf format, 57p.).

Abstract:

Labor supply theory predicts systematic heterogeneity in the impact of recent welfare reforms on earnings, transfers, and income. Yet most welfare reform research focuses on mean impacts. We investigate the importance of heterogeneity using random-assignment data from Connecticut's Jobs First waiver featur[ing] key elements of post-1996 welfare programs. Estimated quantile treatment effects exhibit the substantial heterogeneity predicted by labor supply theory. Thus mean impacts miss a great deal. Looking separately at dropouts and other women does not improve the performance of mean impacts. Evaluating Jobs First relative to AFDC using a class of social welfare functions, we find that Jobs First's performance depends on the degree of inequality aversion, the relative valuation of earnings and transfers, and whether one accounts for Jobs First's greater costs. We conclude that welfare reform's effects are likely both more varied and more extensive than has been recognized.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10121

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

C. "The Timing of Births: Is the Health of Infants Counter-Cyclical?" by Rajeev Dehejia and Adriana Lleras-Muney (w10122, November 2003, .pdf format, 46p.).

Abstract:

This paper documents a counter-cyclical pattern in the health of children, and examines whether this pattern is due to selection of mothers choosing to give birth or due to behavioral changes. We study the relationship between the unemployment rate at the time of a baby's conception and parental characteristics (which we often refer to as quality), parental behaviors, and babies' health. Using national data from the Natality Files from 1975 onward, we find that babies conceived in times of high unemployment have a reduced incidence of low and very low birth weight and a reduced rate of neo-natal and post-neonatal mortality. These health improvements are attributable both to selection (differences in the type of mothers that conceive during recessions) and to changes in behavior during recessions. Black mothers tend to be higher quality (as measured by education and marital status) in times of high unemployment, whereas the quality of white mothers either worsens or does not improve. In the aggregate data, we find some evidence of improved behavior in times of high unemployment, but not for all mothers (use of prenatal care increases for all mothers, but smoking and drinking increase among white mothers). In order to separate out selection and behavioral effects, we use a panel of mothers from California and compare our results to those from the national aggregate data. For blacks, we find that selection drives our results, and that behavioral effects are relatively small. For whites, we find evidence of negative selection, and consequently that behavioral effects are larger than the joint behavior-plus-selection effect. Our findings are consistent with evidence that blacks are credit constrained (and therefore opt out of fertility in times of high unemployment).

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10122

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "browse by publication"
C. Click the "fax/ariel" radio button, type the Journal Name in the "by words in the title" search box and click "search".
D. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

AIDS (Vol. 17, No. 17, 2003).

Social Science Quarterly (Vol. 84, No. 4, 2003). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

Social Science Research (Vol. 32, No. 4, 2003).

Sociological Theory (Vol. 21, No. 4, 2003).

Work and Occupations (Vol. 30, No. 4, 2003).
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Other Journals

American Journal of Public Health (Vol. 93, No. 12, December 2003). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

http://www.ajph.org/content/vol93/issue12/index.shtml?etoc

Medical Care (Vol. 41, No. 11, 2003).

http://www.lww-medicalcare.com/

Click on "Current Issue" for Table of Contents.

Population Research and Policy Review (Vol. 22, No. 4, August 2003). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.kluweronline.com/issn/0167-5923/contents

Public Opinion Quarterly (Vol. 67, No. 3, Fall 2003). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/POQ/journal/available.html

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FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

National Institutes of Health: "Supplements for Methodological Innovations in the Behavioral and Social Sciences (RFA-RM-04-013, Dec. 1, 2003). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-04-013.html

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DATA:

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive (University of Michigan, Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research). SAMHDA has recently added online data extraction capabilities via its Data Analysis System (DAS) for Monitoring the Future, 12th Grade Survey Core for 2002.

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu:8080/SAMHDA-SERIES/00035.xml#das

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu