Current Demographic Research Report #86, June 6, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

========================================================================

Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Report
Centers for Disease Control Surveillance Summaries
National Center for Health Statistics Report
SAMHSA Report
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistics Brief
National Center for Education Statistics Compendium, Reports
Bureau of Labor Statistics Periodical
US Department of Agriculture Article, Report
Bureau of Justice Statistics Report
United Nations Report
World Bank Report
World Health Organization Periodical, News Release
Statistics South Africa Report
National Bureau of Statistics of China Communique
Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation Report
Urban Institute Report
Children's Defense Fund Report
Environmental Defense Fund Report
_British Medical Journal_ Article
Info Health Pop. Reporter
NLS Bibliography Updates

WORKING PAPERS

Department of Economics, Harvard University
Duke University Economics Working Papers
Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis (Minnesota)
World Bank Policy Research Working Papers
United Nations Development Programme
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
University of St. Gallen Department of Economics

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta
Other Journals

DATA

Census Bureau
Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
UK Data Archive
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey
US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service
Office of Immigration Statistics

=========================================================================

REPORTS, ARTICLES, NEWS RELEASES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Report: "School Enrollment--Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2003," by Hyon B. Shin (P20-554, May 2005, .pdf format, tables in Excel, .pdf, and ASCII format, 12p.). A link to the report is available via a Census Bureau press release entitled "School Enrollment Surpasses 1970 Baby-Boom Crest."

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/education/005157.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Centers for Disease Control Surveillance Summaries: "Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance--United States, 2002, and Malaria Surveillance--United States, 2003 (_Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report Surveillance Summaries, Vol. 54, No. SS2, Jun. 2, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 42p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwr_ss.html

Note: This is a temporary address. When 2006 Surveillance Summaries are released, this one, along with all others back to 1993 and selected ones back to 1983 will be available at:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/sursumpv.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Center for Health Statistics Report:

A. "Effects of Form Length and Item Format on Response Patterns and Estimates of Physician Office and Hospital Outpatient Department Visits," by Esther Hing, Susan M. Schappert, Catharine W. Burt, and Iris M. Shimizu (Vital and Health Statistics, Series 2, no. 139, June 2005, .pdf format, 32p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_02/sr02_139.pdf

B. "Supplemental Analyses for Estimates of Excess Deaths Associated with Underweight, Overweight, and Obesity in the U.S. Population," by Katherine Flegel (June 2005).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/pubs/pubd/hestats/excess_deaths/excess_deaths.htm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Report: "Substance Use During Pregnancy: 2002 and 2003 Update," (National Survey on Drug Use & Health (NSDUH) Report, June 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/2k5/pregnancy/pregnancy.cfm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistics Brief: "Access to Care and Use of Preventive Services, 2002: Estimates for the U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population, Age 18 to 64," by Jeffrey A. Rhoades (Statistical Brief #82, June 2005, .pdf format, 7p.).

Abstract:

Using data from the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-HC) for 2002, this Statistical Brief examines the relationship between health insurance coverage status and access to care and the use of health care, including preventive services, among men and women between the ages of 18 to 64 in the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population in 2002.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=691
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Center for Education Statistics Compendium, Reports:

A. _The Condition of Education 2005_, by John Wirt, Patrick Rooney, Bill Hussar; Susan Choy, Stephen Provasnik, and Gillian Hampden-Thompson (NCES 2005094, June 2005, .pdf format, 355p.).

Abstract:

The Condition of Education 2005 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report presents 40 indicators on the status and condition of education and a special analysis of the mobility of elementary and secondary school teachers. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2005 print edition includes 40 indicators in six main areas: (1) enrollment trends and student characteristics at all levels of the education system from elementary education to adult learning; (2) student achievement and the longer term, enduring effects of education; (3) student effort and rates of progress through the educational system among different population groups; (4) the contexts of elementary and secondary education in terms of courses taken, teacher characteristics, and other factors; (5) the contexts of postsecondary education; and (6) societal support for learning, including parental and community support for learning, and public and private financial support of education at all levels.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005094

B. "The Road Less Traveled? Students Who Enroll in Multiple Institutions," by Katharin Peter and Emily Forrest Cataldi (NCES 2005157, May 2005, .pdf format, 79p.). (NCES 2005333, June 2005, .pdf format, 20p.).

Abstract:

This report profiles students who attended multiple institutions - specifically those who co-enrolled (attended more than one institution simultaneously), transferred, or attended 2-year institutions. It looks at the extent to which undergraduates attend multiple institutions as well as the relationship between student' rates of multiple institution attendance and their persistence, attainment, and time to degree. Analysis is based on data from the 1996-01 Beginning Postsecondary Student Study and the 2000-01 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study. The study found that attending more than one institution during the course of undergraduate enrollment is a common practice. Among students enrolling for the first time in 1995/96, 40 percent had attended more than one institution as of 2001, while among 1999/2000 college graduates, nearly 60 percent had done so.Among those same graduates, transferring and co-enrolling were associated with longer average times to completion.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005157

C. "Adolescent Cigarette Smoking: A Longitudinal Analysis Through Young Adulthood," by David C. Miller

Abstract:

The primary aims of this report are to (1) identify the incidence of daily smoking at several time points during the adolescent and young adult years, including the prevalence of new daily smokers relative to repeat daily smokers; (2) identify several specific developmental patterns of smoking; and (3) examine the specific developmental patterns of smoking in relation to various descriptive characteristics. This analysis uses data from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88), where the smoking behavior of a nationally representative cohort of 1988 eighth-graders was assessed at various time points over a 12-year period (i.e., from about age 14 to age 26). Results show that 6 percent at 8th grade, 12 percent at 10th grade, 17 percent at 12th grade, and one-quarter at the age of about 26 years reported usually smoking one or more cigarettes a day. Using the information obtained about individuals' smoking behavior over the time period, 68 percent were identified as nondaily smokers, followed by teen/young adult smokers (15 percent), and then teen smokers (9 percent) and late-onset smokers (8 percent). Bivariate and multivariate analyses are used to examine these developmental patterns in relation to individual demographic characteristics, family demographic characteristics, and various education-related characteristics. It was found, for example, that adolescent smoking is associated with lower academic achievement, which is consistent with prior research.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005333

D. "Rates of Computer and Internet Use by Children in Nursery School and Students in Kindergarten Through Twelfth Grade: 2003," (NCES 2005111, June 2005, .pdf format, 3p.).

Abstract:

The primary aims of this report are to (1) identify the incidence of daily smoking at several time points during the adolescent and young adult years, including the prevalence of new daily smokers relative to repeat daily smokers; (2) identify several specific developmental patterns of smoking; and (3) examine the specific developmental patterns of smoking in relation to various descriptive characteristics. This analysis uses data from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88), where the smoking behavior of a nationally representative cohort of 1988 eighth-graders was assessed at various time points over a 12-year period (i.e., from about age 14 to age 26). Results show that 6 percent at 8th grade, 12 percent at 10th grade, 17 percent at 12th grade, and one-quarter at the age of about 26 years reported usually smoking one or more cigarettes a day. Using the information obtained about individuals' smoking behavior over the time period, 68 percent were identified as nondaily smokers, followed by teen/young adult smokers (15 percent), and then teen smokers (9 percent) and late-onset smokers (8 percent). Bivariate and multivariate analyses are used to examine these developmental patterns in relation to individual demographic characteristics, family demographic characteristics, and various education-related characteristics. It was found, for example, that adolescent smoking is associated with lower academic achievement, which is consistent with prior research.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005111
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bureau of Labor Statistics Periodicals, News Release:

A. _Monthly Labor Review_ (Vol. 128, No. 5, May 2005, .pdf format).

http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/mlrhome.htm

Note: This is a temporary address. When the next _MLR_ is released, this one, along with all others back to 1982, will be available at:

http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/archive.htm

B. _Compensation and Working Conditions Online, May 2005_. The latest article is dated May 24, 2005.

http://www.bls.gov/opub/cwc/home.htm

C. "Work Experience of the Population in 2003" (Jun. 3, 2005, HTML, ASCII text and .pdf format, 9p.).

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/work.toc.htm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

US Department of Agriculture Article: "Obesity Policy and the Law of Unintended Consequences," by Fred Kuchler, Jayachandran N. Variyam, and Stephen R. Crutchfield (in _Amber Waves_, Vol. 3, No. 3, June 2005, HTML and .pdf format, p. 26-33).

http://www.ers.usda.gov/AmberWaves/June05/Features/ObesityPolicy.htm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bureau of Justice Statistics Report: "Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners (RSAT) Program," (NJC 206269, April 205, .pdf format, 43 p.)

http://www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/bja/206269.pdf
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

United Nations reports:

A."Population and HIV/AIDS 2005," (Wall Chart, .pdf format with excel table).

Wallchart (2p.):

http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/POP_HIVAIDS2005/HIV_AIDSchart_2005.pdf

Table:

http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/POP_HIVAIDS2005/AIDS_Wallchart_2005_Web.xls

B."Population, development and HIV/AIDS with particular emphasis on poverty: the concise report," (June 2005, .pdf format, 67 p.).

http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/concise2005/PopdevHIVAIDS.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

World Bank Report: "Governance Matters IV: Governance Indicators for 1996-2004," by Daniel Kaufmann, Aart Kraay, and Massimo Mastruzzi (May 2005, .pdf format, with data and charts in various formats). "This paper presents the latest update of our estimates of six dimensions of governance covering 209 countries and territories for five time periods: 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002 and 2004. These indicators are based on several hundred individual variables measuring perceptions of governance, drawn from 37 separate data sources constructed by 31 different organizations. We assign these individual measures of governance to categories capturing key dimensions of governance, and use an unobserved component model to construct six aggregate governance indicators in each of the four periods. We present the point estimates of the dimensions of governance as well as the margins of error for each country for the four periods. These margins of error are not unique to perceptions-based measures of governance, but are an important feature of all efforts to measure governance, including objective indicators. In fact, we provide examples of how individual objective measures provide an incomplete picture of even the quite particular dimensions of governance that they are intended to measure."

http://www.worldbank.org/wbi/governance/pubs/govmatters4.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

World Health Organization Periodical, News Release:

A. _Bulletin of the World Health Organization_ (vol. 83, no. 6, June 2005, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/83/6/en/index.html

Note: This is a temporary address. When the next _BWHO_ is released, this one, along with all others back to 1947 will be available at:

http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/en/

B. "Almost 2 billion more people need access to basic sanitation by 2015 to meet millenium target". (June 3, 2005). The news release is linked to a new report titled: "Water for Life, Making it Happen," .pdf format, 38p. including statistical tables).

News Release:

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2005/pr23/en/index.html

Report:

http://www.wssinfo.org/pdf/JMP_05_text.pdf

Tables:

http://www.wssinfo.org/pdf/JMP_05_tables.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Statistics South Africa Report: "Mid-year population estimates, 2005" (May 2005, .pdf format, 25p.). The report is linked to from a SSAR article, originally published in _Business Report_ (a supplement to _Star_ [Johannesburg], _Cape Times_ [Cape Town], _Mercury_ [Durban], and _News_ [Pretoria]) for Jun. 2, 2005: "Population and GDP estimates use many data sources," by Pali Lehohla.

http://www.statssa.gov.za/news_archive/2jun2005_1.asp

Link to full text is at the bottom of the article.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Bureau of Statistics of China Communique: "China Will Conduct It's 2nd National Census of Agriculture in 2006," (June 3, 2005, .pdf format). Note: Cancel any request to download a Chinese language character set. This communique is in English.

http://www.stats.gov.cn/english/newsandcomingevents/t20050603_402254000.htm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation Report: "Diversity and the Ph.D," (May 2005, .pdf format, 59p.).

http://www.woodrow.org/newsroom/News_Releases/phd_diversity.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Urban Institute Reports:

A. "Choices, Challenges, and Options: Child SSI Recipients Preparing for the Transition to Adult Life," by Pamela J. Loprest and David Wittenburg (May 2005, .pdf format, 65p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses the newly released National Survey of Children and Families (NSCF) to study the transition experiences of child Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients just prior to and after age 18. Since reforms passed in 1996, child SSI recipients must now have their eligibility for benefits redetermined at age 18 using the adult disability standard. We study the work preparation activities and family circumstances of a pre-transition cohort of young people ages 14 to 17 in 2000. We also examine a post-transition cohort of young people ages 19 to 23 in 2000, comparing income, work, personal and family circumstances of those on SSI benefits after age 18 to those who no longer receive these benefits. We find that the pre-transition SSI recipients come from economically disadvantaged families in which many parents are not working, have low levels of education, or do not speak English. Only a minority of these recipients had ever participated in vocational training or vocational rehabilitation (VR) and many had never heard of SSI work incentive provisions. In addition, more than one in six reported serious behavior problems in school or trouble with the juvenile justice system. Our findings for the post-transition cohort show that those who no longer receive SSI at age 18 ("off SSI") are in better health and more likely to be working than those who continue on benefits ("on SSI"). We also find that some who are off SSI at age 18 are replacing that income from alternative sources, though most continue to have incomes below poverty and about one-half dropped out of school and a third have been arrested. Interestingly, we find that participation in vocational training or VR was not correlated with continuation of SSI benefits after age 18, though it was correlated with working past age 18.These findings should be relevant to ongoing efforts to improve the transition process for child SSI recipients and to understand some of the circumstances of young people after the age 18 redetermination.

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411168

B. "Who Graduates in the South?" by Christopher B. Swanson (June 2005, .pdf format, 3p.). "Graduation rates for the high school class of 2002 show that less than 65 percent of all students attending public schools in the South complete high school with a regular diploma. This level falls below the national average of close to 70 percent. Findings also show very large disparities between students from different racial and ethnic groups. A graduation gap of about 27 percentage points separates the highest- and the lowest-performing groups. Historically disadvantaged minority groups in the South have graduation rates that range from 55 to 58 percent. Fewer than 60 percent of all students graduate from high school in central city districts and in communities that suffer from high levels of racial and socioeconomic segregation."

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=900817
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Children's Defense Fund Report: "Food Insecurity 2005: More Than 13 Million Children Face Food Insecurity," (June 2, 2005, .pdf format, 6p.).

http://www.childrensdefense.org/familyincome/foodinsecurity2005.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Environmental Defense Fund Report: "Resistant Bugs and Antibiotic Drugs: State and County Estimates of Antibiotics in Agricultural Feed and Animal Waste," by Karen Florini, Richard Denison, Terri Stiffler, Timothy Fitzgerald and Rebecca Goldburg (June 2005, .pdf format, 48p.).

http://www.environmentaldefense.org/article.cfm?contentID=4154

More information on EDF:

http://www.environmentaldefense.org/home.cfm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

_British Medical Journal_ Article: "HIV infections acquired through heterosexual intercourse in the United Kingdom: findings from national surveillance," by Sarah Dougan, Victoria L. Gilbart, Katy Sinka, and Barry G. Evans (vol. 330, no. 7503, June 3, 2005, .pdf and HTML format, p. 1303-1304).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/330/7503/1303
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Info Health Pop. Reporter: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (vol. 5, no. 23, Jun. 6, 2005). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

NLS Bibliography Updates: Note: These citations, along with all of the NLS bibliography, can be found at:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/

Note: Where available, direct links to full text have been provided. These references represent updated citations from May 23 - Jun. 3, 2005.

For more information on any of these citations (selected abstracts are available) go to the above listed address and click on "Title List". Click on the first item, which will give the syntax of the citation urls:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/qtitle.php3?myrow[0]=320

Then change the number after the equal sign (320 in this case) to the number listed as the "ID Number" in the citations below. You will be taken to the full citation listing.

AVELLAR, SARAH A.
SMOCK, PAMELA J.
The Economic Consequences of the Dissolution of Cohabiting Unions
Journal of Marriage and Family 67,2 (May 2005): 315-328
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4978
Publisher: National Council on Family Relations

CETRON, MARVIN J.
DAVIES, OWEN
Trends Now Shaping the Future
Futurist 39,3 (May-June 2005): 37-51
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4979
Publisher: World Future Society

LIGHT, AUDREY
MCGARRY, KATHLEEN
Why Parents Play Favorites: Explanations for Unequal Bequests.
American Economic Review 94,5 (December 2004): 1669-1682
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Young Women
ID Number: 4980
Publisher: American Economic Association

ROWE, DAVID C.
Under the Skin: On the Impartial Treatment of Genetic and Environmental
Hypotheses
American Psychologist 60, 1 (January 2005): 60-70. Also,
http://www.apa.org/journals/releases/amp60160.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
ID Number: 4982
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)

BLANDEN, JO
International Evidence on Intergenerational Mobility
Working Paper: London, England, Centre for Economic Performance, London School
of Economics, May 2005. Also,
http://cep.lse.ac.uk/stokerochford/papers/new/blanden.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men
ID Number: 4987
Publisher: Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics & Political Science

SONG, XUEDA
Essays on Technological Change and Labor Markets
Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany, 2004, DAI-A 65/11, p. 4297, May 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4988
Publisher: ProQuest Information and Learning

RIPANI, LAURA ALEJANDRA
Essays in Empirical Labor Economics and the Economics of Gender (Computer-Use, Workgroup's Gender Composition And Motherhood)
Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2004. DAI-A
65/11, p. 4297, May 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4989
Publisher: ProQuest Information and Learning

HUNT, ANDREA NICOLE
Family, Gender, and Delinquency from an Integrated Power-Control Model
M.A.Thesis, University of South Alabama, 2004, 91 pages; AAT 1423355. MAI
43/02, p. 455, Apr 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY97
ID Number: 4990
Publisher: ProQuest Information and Learning

SIDHU, NIRMAL S.
The Role of Cognitive Ability in the Health-Education Nexus
M.A., University of Calgary (Canada), 2004. MAI 43/02, p. 419, Apr 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4991
Publisher: ProQuest Information and Learning

COUCH, KENNETH A.
LILLARD, DEAN R.
Nonlinearities in Intergenerational Mobility: A Comparison of Germany and the United States
In: Generational Income Mobility in North America and Europe, M. Corak, ed.,
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004
Cohort(s): Mature Women, Older Men, Young Men
ID Number: 4993
Publisher: Cambridge University Press

LUNDBERG, SHELLY
ROMICH, JENNIFER L.
Decision-Making by the Children of the NLSY
Working Paper: Los Angeles, CA, California Center for Population Research,
March 2005. Also, http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/docs/Lundberg-Child%20decisions.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
ID Number: 4997
Publisher: California Center for Population Research (CCPR)

BARROW, LISA
ROUSE, CECILIA ELENA
Do Returns to Schooling Differ by Race and Ethnicity?
Working Paper No. WP-2005-02: Chicago, IL, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago,
February 2005. Also,
http://www.chicagofed.org/publications/workingpapers/wp2005_02.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
ID Number: 4999
Publisher: Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

HAM, JOHN C.
REAGAN, PATRICIA BENTON
LI, XIANGHONG
Propensity Score Matching, a Distance-Based Measure of Migration, and the Wage Growth of Young Men
Working Paper No. 05.13. Institute for Economic Policy Research, December 2004.
Also, http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=671062
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 5001
Publisher: Institute for Economic Policy Research

Return to top

=========================================================================

WORKING PAPERS:

Department of Economics, Harvard University: "An Empirical Analysis of 'Acting White'," by Ronald G. Fryer Jr. and Paul Torelli (May 2005, .pdf format, 43p.).

Abstract:

There is a debate among social scientists regarding the existence of a peer externality commonly referred to as "acting white." Using a newly available data set (the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health), which allows one to construct an objective measure of a student's popularity, we demonstrate that there are large racial differences in the relationship between popularity and academic achievement; our (albeit narrow) definition of "acting white." The effect is intensified among high achievers and in schools with more interracial contact, but non-existent among students in predominantly black schools or private schools. The patterns in the data appear most consistent with a two audience signaling model in which investments in education are thought to be indicative of an individual's opportunity costs of peer group loyalty. Other models we consider, such as self-sabotage among black youth or the presence of an oppositional culture, all contradict the data in important ways.

http://post.economics.harvard.edu/faculty/fryer/papers/fryer_torelli.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Duke University Economics Working Papers: "Child Nutrition in India in the Nineties: A Story of Increased Gender Inequality?" by Alessandro Tarozzi and Aprajit Mahajan (Working Paper #05-06, May 2005, .pdf format, 41p.).

Abstract:

We establish some new interesting stylized facts on the changes in boy versus girl nutritional status in India during the nineties, a period of rapid economic growth. Our analysis is based on the comparison, over time and across genders, of the distribution of z-scores calculated for height and weight measures. Overall, we find that child nutrition improved substantially, but we also find that gender differences in nutritional status increased as well, with nutritional status improving substantially more for boys than for girls. Consistent with a large literature that shows the existence of a steep North-South gradient in gender inequality in India, we find that changes in nutritional status appear to be much more similar between genders in the South. We also estimate predicted changes in nutritional status based on changes in the distribution of household wealth (proxied by asset ownership) and a few other observed household characteristics. Actual changes appear to be relatively close to predicted ones in urban areas. For children living in the rural sector the results are more mixed, and we observe that actual changes in weight are quite larger than predicted ones for boys, while they are much worse than the predicted ones for girl height. We also estimate that the predicted changes are generally larger for boys than for girls.

http://www.econ.duke.edu/Papers/Abstracts05/abstract.05.06.html

Click on "PDF version" at the bottom of the abstract for link to full text.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis (Minnesota): "Does Income Inequality Lead to Consumption Equality? Evidence and Theory," by Dirk Krueger and Fabrizio Perri (Staff Report 363, June 2005, .pdf format and PostScript format, 53p.).

Abstract:

Using data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey, we first document that the recent increase in income inequality in the United States has not been accompanied by a corresponding rise in consumption inequality. Much of this divergence is due to different trends in within-group inequality, which has increased significantly for income but little for consumption. We then develop a simple framework that allows us to analytically characterize how within-group income inequality affects consumption inequality in a world in which agents can trade a full set of contingent consumption claims, subject to endogenous constraints emanating from the limited enforcement of intertemporal contracts (as in Kehoe and Levine, 1993). Finally, we quantitatively evaluate, in the context of a calibrated general equilibrium production economy, whether this setup, or alternatively a standard incomplete markets model (as in Aiyagari, 1994), can account for the documented stylized consumption inequality facts from the U.S. data.

http://minneapolisfed.org/research/common/pub_detail.cfm?pb_autonum_id=1034
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

World Bank Policy Research Working Papers: The World Bank Policy Research Programme has recently released several working papers that may be of interest to population researchers. Extensive abstracts, as well as links to full text (ASCII and .pdf format) are available. To access them follow the below listed instructions.

Point your browser to:

http://econ.worldbank.org/docsearch

In the search box type "WPSXXXX" (without the quotes) where XXX is the number of the paper you are interested in. Then click on the title.

3576. Poverty in Rural and Semi-urban Mexico during 1992-2002, by Dorte Verner

3579. A Poverty-Inequality Trade-off? by Martin Ravallion

3580. On the Contribution of Demographic Change to Aggregate Poverty Measures for the Developing World, by Martin Ravallion

3581. Brain waste? Educated immigrants in the U.S. labor market, by Aaditya Mattoo, Ileana Cristina Neagu, and Caglar Ozden

3582. Does Temporary Migration have to be Permanent? by Aaditya Mattoo and Mohammad Amin

3588. The Contribution of Skilled Immigration and International Graduate Students to U.S. Innovation, by Gnanaraj Chellaraj, Keith E. Maskus, and Aaditya Mattoo

3592. Which Inequality Matters? Growth Evidence based on Small Area Welfare Estimates in Uganda,Uwe Deichmann, Somik V. Lall, and Ajay Suri

3594. Democratization and Clientelism: Why are Young Democracies Badly Governed? by Philip Keefer

3596. Household Savings and Residential Mobility in Informal Settlement, by by Youdi Schipper and Johannes G. Hoogeveen

3601. Migration, Trade, and Foreign Direct Investment in Mexico, by Patricio Aroca Gonzalez and William F. Maloney

3602.  Teacher Shocks and Student Learning : Evidence from Zambia, by Jishnu Das, Stefan Dercon, James Habyarimana, and Pramila Krishnan

3604.  The Effect of School Type on Academic Achievement: Evidence from Indonesia, by David Newhouse and Kathleen Beegle

3605. Cognitive Development among Young Children in Ecuador: the Roles of Wealth, Health and Parenting, by Christina Paxson and Norbert Schady

3610.  Effects of Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Education on Economic Growth: Evidence from Guatemala, by Josef L. Loening
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

United Nations Development Programme: "On Assessing Pro-Poorness of Government Programmes: International Comparisons," by Nanak Kakwani and Hyun H. Son (UNDP Poverty Center WP No. 6, May 2005, .pdf format, 25p.).

Abstract:

This paper proposes a new "Pro-Poor Policy (PPP)" index, which measures the pro-poorness of government programmes, as well as basic service delivery in education, health and infrastructure. The index provides a means to assess the targeting efficiency of government programmes compared to perfect targeting. The paper also deals with the policy issue of how targeting efficiency of government programmes varies across various socioeconomic groups. To this effect, the paper develops two types of PPP indices by socioeconomic groups, which are within-group and total-group PPP indices. The within-group PPP index captures how well targeted a programme is within a group. On the other hand, if our objective is to maximize poverty reduction at the national level, the targeting efficiency of particular group should be judged on the basis of total-group PPP index. Using micro unit-record data on household surveys from Thailand, Russia, Vietnam, and 15 African countries, the paper evaluates a wide range of government programmes and basic services.

http://www.undp-povertycentre.org/newsletters/WorkingPaper6.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "Disagreement in Partners' Reports of Financial Difficulty," by Robert Breunig, Deborah Cobb-Clark, Xiaodong Gong, Daniella Venn (Discussion Paper No. 1624, June 2005, .pdf format, 34p.).

Abstract:

We use unique data in which both partners report about household finances to demonstrate that there is often disagreement about whether the household has experienced financial difficulty in the past year. Four alternative explanations for this disagreement are tested using the data. The results indicate that disagreement may be related to the severity of the underlying material hardship rather than to gender differences, information asymmetries, or individual (as opposed to household) views of financial difficulty. This implies that standard surveys which collect information about the household's financial position from a representative individual may fail to completely characterize the nature of material hardship.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1624.pdf

B. "Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans," by Brian Duncan and Stephen Trejo (Discussion Paper No. 1629, June 2005, .pdf format, 57p.).

Abstract:

Using Census and CPS data, we show that U.S.-born Mexican Americans who marry non-Mexicans are substantially more educated and English proficient, on average, than are Mexican Americans who marry co-ethnics (whether they be Mexican Americans or Mexican immigrants). In addition, the non-Mexican spouses of intermarried Mexican Americans possess relatively high levels of schooling and English proficiency, compared to the spouses of endogamously married Mexican Americans. The human capital selectivity of Mexican intermarriage generates corresponding differences in the employment and earnings of Mexican Americans and their spouses. Moreover, the children of intermarried Mexican Americans are much less likely to be identified as Mexican than are the children of endogamous Mexican marriages. These forces combine to produce strong negative correlations between the education, English proficiency, employment, and earnings of Mexican-American parents and the chances that their children retain a Mexican ethnicity. Such findings raise the possibility that selective ethnic "attrition" might bias observed measures of intergenerational progress for Mexican Americans

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1629.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

University of St. Gallen [Switzerland] Department of Economics: "The Impact of Direct Democracy on Public Education: Performance of Swiss Students in Reading," by Justina A. V. Fischer (Discussion Paper No. 2005-10, April 2005, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

This paper analyzes the impact of direct legislation at the cantonal level on the quality of public education in Switzerland, using a cross-section of individual data on reading performance similar to that used in the OECD-PISA study. For this purpose, a structural and a reduced form of an educational production function is estimated. The OLS estimate of a composite index of direct democracy supports the findings previously obtained for U.S. states in which initiative-driven tax limits have had a deleterious effect on student performance in public schools. For a more complete picture, the impact of direct democracy on several portions of the conditional test score distribution is also investigated using a quantile regression method. The negative impact appears to be equal in size between the estimated quantiles and to occur exclusively through the budgetary channel. Moreover, the equipment of schools is found to matter for student performance. Finally, no redistributive influence on students attending the same class is found.

http://www.vwa.unisg.ch/RePEc/usg/dp2005/DP-10_FJ.pdf

Return to top

=========================================================================

JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "advanced search"
C. Type in your publication name and click "Exact title" radio button
D. Under "Show", click the "fax/ariel" radio button.
E. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

American Sociological Review (Vol. 70, No. 2, April 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

Journal of Biosocial Science (vol. 37 no. 3, May 2005).

Social Science Quarterly (vol. 86 no. 2 June 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the EBSCO Host Academic Elite database. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Other Journals:

AIDS (Vol. 19 supplement 2, May 2005).

http://www.aidsonline.com/pt/re/aids/issuelist.htm

Journal of Family History (Vol. 30, No. 3, July 1, 2005).

http://jfh.sagepub.com/archive/

Return to top

=========================================================================

DATA:

Census Bureau: The Census Bureau has released selected tables from the 2003 American Housing Census (HTML format).

http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/housing/ahs/ahs03/ahs03.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Detroit Area Study, 1997: Social Change in Religion and Child Rearing (#4120)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04120.xml
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

UK Data Archive (Essex University, Colchester, UK): The UK Data Archive has recently added the following dataset to its holdings. Note: There may be charges or licensing requirements on holdings of the UK Data Archive. For more information see:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/

Improving Survey Measurement of Income and Employment (ISMIE), 2001-2003 (SN 5157)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/search/indexSearch.asp?ct=xmlSn&q1=5157

Transition out of the Parental Home in Britain, Spain and Norway, 2001-2002 (SN 5100)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/search/indexSearch.asp?ct=xmlSn&q1=5100
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Medical Expenditure Panel Survey:

A. "MEPS HC-073: 2003 Full Year Population Characteristics," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, May 2005, data in .zip and .exe self-decompressing ASCII and SAS transport format, SAS and SPSS programming statements, documentation in HTML, ASCII, .pdf or ASP codebook format).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=179

B. "MEPS HC-074: 2003 Jobs Files," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, May 2005, data in .zip and .exe self-decompressing ASCII and SAS transport format, SAS and SPSS programming statements, documentation in HTML, ASCII, .pdf or ASP codebook format).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=178

C. "1996 - 2003 MEPS/NHIS Link Files" (CD-ROM only, available by request only).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=180
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service: "Population Interaction Zones for Agriculture (PIZA) (ArcInfo GRIDS, ESRI Shape Files, and County-Level PII and PIZA Text File)." "Widespread conversion of rural lands to urban uses has drawn attention at all levels of government. To provide information useful for projections of future changes in land use, ERS has created a system to classify remaining farmland into "population-interaction zones for agriculture" (PIZA). These zones represent areas of agricultural land use in which urban-related activities (residential, commercial, and industrial) affect the economic and social environment of agriculture. In these zones, interactions between urban-related population and farm production activities tend to increase the value of farmland, change the production practices and enterprises of farm operators, and elevate the probability that farmland will be converted to urban-related uses."

http://www.ers.usda.gov/Data/PopulationInteractionZones/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Office of Immigration Statistics Compendium: _Yearbook of Immigration Statistics: 2004_: Temporary Admissions (Nonimmigrants). OIS has released this set of tables from the _Yearbook of Immigration Statistics_ (Microsoft Excel format).

http://uscis.gov/graphics/shared/statistics/yearbook/YrBk04TA.htm

Return to top

Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu