Current Demographic Research Report #85, May 31, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Compilation, News Releases, Facts for Figures
National Center for Education Statistics Reports
National Center for Health Statistics Report
Centers for Disease Control Periodical Article
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistics Brief
SAMHSA Report
UN Food and Agriculture Organization Report
UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Compendium
World Health Organization Compendium
World Health Assembly News Release
International Monetary Fund Periodical
Australian Department of Health and Ageing Periodical
Statistics South Africa Report
Urban Institute Report
Kaiser Family Foundation Report
_Nature_ Special Issue
_Science_ Article Abstract
_Proceedings of the National Academy of Science_ Article Abstract
_New England Journal of Medicine_ Perspective Extract
Info Health Pop. Reporter

WORKING PAPERS

National Bureau of Economic Research
East-West Center
Population Council
Penn State Population Research Institute
University of Michigan Population Studies Center
Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
Vanderbilt University Department of Economics
Yale University Economic Growth Center
Luxembourg Income Study
Institute for the Study of Labor
Institute for Social and Economic Research

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Other Journals

CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS

University of Essex

DATA

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
IPUMS
NLS Web Investigator Update
Luxembourg Income Study

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REPORTS, ARTICLES, NEWS RELEASES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau News Releases, Facts for Figures:

A. "Census of Population and Housing: 1890 Census." The Census Bureau is making available many of the statistical volumes, compendium, and atlases from the 1890 Census in electronic format (.pdf format and .zip compressed .pdf format). The publications are available at:

http://www2.census.gov/prod2/decennial/1890.htm

B. "Median Housing Values Continue to Rise, Census Bureau Reports" (CB05-AC.54, May 24, 2005). The release links to state, county, and place ranking tables, as well as state ranking tables for number of million dollar homes (all .pdf format). Source for the data is the American Community Survey.

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/american_community_survey_acs/004974.html

C. "U.S. Voter Turnout Up in 2004, Census Bureau Reports" (CB05-73, May 26, 2005, accompanying detailed and historical tables in Microsoft Excel and comma separated value [.csv] format.

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/voting/004986.html

D. "5th Anniversary of Americans with Disabilities Act: July 26, 2005" CB05-FF.10, May 26, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

HTML:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/004998.html

.pdf:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2005/cb05ff-10.pdf
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National Center for Education Statistics Reports:

A. "Programs and Plans of the National Center for Education Statistics. 2005 Edition." by Barb Mareness (NCES 2005113, May 2005, .pdf format, 198 p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2005/2005113.pdf

B. "2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04) Report on Faculty and Instructional Staff in Fall 2003," by E. Forrest Cataldi, M. Fahimi, and E.M. Bradburn (NCES 2005172, May 2005, .pdf format, 41p.).

Abstract:

This publication is the first from the 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04), a study of faculty and instructional staff employed in degree-granting public and private not-for-profit postsecondary institutions in the United States. This report describes the gender, race/ethnicity, tenure status, and income of all faculty and instructional staff, by employment status, institution type, and program area.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005172

C. "Parent and Family Involvement in Education: 2002-03," by Nancy Vaden-Kiernan and John McManus (NCES 2005043, May 2005, .pdf format, 68p.).

Abstract:

focuses on their parents' and families' involvement in the students' education. The report looks at both educational activities related to school and at educational activities outside of school. For example, the report shows that 77 percent of students had parents who participated in regularly scheduled conferences with teachers and 44 percent had visited a library with their parents in the last month.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005043
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National Center for Health Statistics Report: "National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2003 Emergency Department Summary," by Linda F. McCaig, and Catharine W. Burt (Advance Data for Fital and Health Statistics No. 358, May 2005, .pdf format, 40p.). The report is linked to from a NCHS news release: "Visits to U.S. Emergency Departments at All-Time High; Number of Departments Shrinking" (May 26, 2005).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/05news/emergencydept.htm

Click on "View/Download PDF" for full text.
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Centers for Disease Control Periodical: The latest issue of _Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_ (Vol. 54, No. 20, May 27, 2005, HTML and .pdf format) is centered on World Tobacco Day, May 31, 2005. There are several articles on tobacco use in the issue.

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwr_wk.html

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5420.pdf

Note: The HTML address is a temporary one. When the next _MMWR_ is released, this one will be available at:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/weekcvol.html

After Jan. 1, 2006, it will be available at:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwrpvol.html
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Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistics Brief:

A. "The Five Most Costly Medical Conditions, 1997 and 2002: Estimates for the U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population," by Gary L. Olin, and Jeffrey A. Rhoades (Statistical Brief #80, May 2005, .pdf format, 5p.).

Abstract:

This Statistical Brief presents data from the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-HC) concerning medical expenditures for the five most costly medical conditions in 1997 and 2002 for the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized (community) population. These five conditions--heart conditions, cancer, trauma, mental disorders, and pulmonary conditions--were determined by totaling and ranking the expenses for the medical care delivered for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic conditions.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=689

B. "Concentration of Health Care Expenditures in the U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population," by William W. Yu and Trena M. Ezzati-Rice (Statistical Brief #81, May 2005, .pdf format, 6p.).

Abstract:

Using data from the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-HC) for 1996 and 2002 and the National Medical Expenditure Survey (NMES) for 1987, this Statistical Brief presents estimates on the concentration of health care expenditures. These data indicate that health care spending is highly concentrated, with a relatively small proportion of the population accounting for a large share of total health care expenses.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=690
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Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Report: "Treatment Admissions Receiving Public Assistance: 2002" (Drug and Alcohol Services Information System (DASIS) Report, May 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k5/govAid/govAid.cfm
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UN Food and Agriculture Organization Report: "Assessment of the World Food Security Situation" (Committee on World Food Security, May 2005).

http://www.fao.org/docrep/meeting/009/J4968e/j4968e00.htm

Press release:

http://www.fao.org/newsroom/en/news/2005/102562/index.html
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UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Compendium: "Asia-Pacific in Figures 2004," (ST/ESCAP/2352, May 2005,.pdf format, 70p.).

http://www.unescap.org/stat/data/apif/index.asp
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World Health Organization Compendium: "_World Health Statistics, 2005_," (May 2005, .pdf, Excel, and JPEG format). Note: "In May 2005, WHO published an organization wide compilation of the most recent estimates for almost 50 world health indicators for 192 countries. The World Health Statistics 2005 is available in hard copy and in web-navigable format; it is based on the databases maintained by WHO's programs at headquarters and in regional offices."

http://www3.who.int/statistics/
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World Health Assembly News Release: "World Health Assembly concludes: adopts key resolutions affecting global public health" (May 25, 2005).

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2005/pr_wha06/en/print.html
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International Monetary Fund Periodical: _Finance and Development_ (Vol. 42, No. 2, June 2005).

http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/fandd/2005/06/index.htm
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Australian Department of Health and Ageing Periodical, Report:

A. _Communicable Diseases Intelligence_ Quarterly Report, Vol. 29, No. 1, 2005, .pdf format, 123p.). The report is linked to from a ADHA news release: "Australia's 2003 communicable diseases status report released" (May 26, 2005).

http://www.health.gov.au/internet/wcms/publishing.nsf/Content/health-mediarel-yr2005-dept-deptmr260505.htm

Link to the report is at the bottom of the news release.

B. "Australian Hospital Statistics 2003-04" (Health Services Series No. 23, May 2005, .pdf format, 342p.).

Abstract:

Australian Hospital Statistics 2003-04 provides an eleventh year in the Institute's comprehensive annual statistical reporting of statistics on Australia's hospitals. Detailed information is presented on hospital care and hospitals in 2003-04, as are summaries of changes over time, and comparisons between public and private hospitals. Included are statistics on admissions to public and private hospitals in 2003-04, covering the age and sex of patients, diagnoses, procedures, lengths of stay and waiting times for elective surgery. Also included are hospital expenditure, revenue and bed numbers, and a range of hospital performance indicators reported using the National Health Performance Framework. Included for the first time in 2003-04 are more comprehensive statistics about patients who presented to selected public hospital emergency departments. The statistics now cover patients' demographics, triage categories, waiting times, durations of care and a range of other data. This report is a useful resource for health planners, administrators and researchers with an interest in the Australian hospital system.

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10130
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Statistics South Africa Report: "Achieving a better life for all: Progress between Census '96 and Census 2001" (Report no. 03-02-16 (2001), 2005, .pdf format, 202p.). The report is linked to from a SSA article: "Report from census data shows how to achieve better life for all," by Pali Lehohla, originally published in _Business Report_ (May 26, 2005).

http://www.statssa.gov.za/news_archive/26may2005_1.asp

Link to report is at the bottom of the article.
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Urban Institute Report: "Ebbing and Flowing: Some Gains, Some Losses as SCHIP Responds to Third Year of Budget Pressure," by Ian Hill, Brigette Courtot, and Jennifer Sullivan (New Federalism: Issues and Options for States No. A-68, May 2005, .pdf format, 11p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311166
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Kaiser Family Foundation Report: "The Use of Oregon's Evidence-Based Reviews for Medicaid Pharmacy Policies: Experiences in Four States," by Ryan Padrez, Tanisha Carino, Jonathan Blum, and Dan Mendelson (May 2005, .pdf format, 22p.). "This report explores how four state Medicaid programs--Washington, Wyoming, Minnesota, and North Carolina--differ in their use of Oregon's Drug Effectiveness Review Project (DERP) to manage their prescription drug benefit."

http://www.kff.org/medicaid/7319.cfm
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_Nature_ Special Issue: The May 26, 2005 (Vol. 435, No. 7041) issue of _Nature_ is a special issue devoted to Avian Flu. Full text may or may not be available depending on whether you or your institution subscribe to the publication.

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v435/n7041/index.html
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_Science_ Article Abstract: "Firearm Violence Exposure and Serious Violent Behavior," by Jeffrey B. Bingenheimer, Robert T. Brennan, and Felton J. Earls (_Science_, Vol. 380, no. 5726, May 27, 2005, p. 1323-1326).

http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/308/5726/1323
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_Proceedings of the National Academy of Science_ Article Abstract: "Simultaneous inference of selection and population growth from patterns of variation in the human genome," by Scott H. Williamson, Ryan Hernandez, Adi Fledel-Alon, Lan Zhu, Rasmus Nielsen, and Carlos D. Bustamante (Vol. 102, No. 22, May 31, 2005, p. 7882-7887).

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/102/22/7882
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_Lancet_ Correspondence: Note: _Lancet_ requires free registration before providing content. "Stagnation of Ghana's under-5 mortality rate," by Bob Pond, Eddie Addai, and Samuel T. Kwashie (_Lancet_ vol. 365, no. 9474, May 28, 2005, p. 1846).

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS014067360566610X/fulltext
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_New England Journal of Medicine_ Perspective Extract: "Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever in Angola-Fighting Fear and a Lethal Pathogen," by Nestor Ndayimirije, and Mary Kay Kindhauser (Vol. 352, No. 21, p. 2155-2157).

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/extract/352/21/2155
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Info Health Pop. Reporter: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (vol. 5, no. 22, May. 30, 2005). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

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WORKING PAPERS:

National Bureau of Economic Research:

A. Gender, Body Mass and Economic Status, by Dalton Conley and Rebecca Glauber (w11343, May 2005, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract:

Previous research on the effect of body mass on economic outcomes has used a variety of methods to mitigate endogeneity bias. We extend this research by using an older sample of U.S. individuals from the PSID. This sample allows us to examine age-gender interactive effects. Through sibling-random and fixed effects models, we find that a one percent increase in a woman's body mass results in a .6 percentage point decrease in her family income and a .4 percentage point decrease in her occupational prestige measured 13 to 15 years later. Body mass is also associated with a reduction in a woman's likelihood of marriage, her spouse's occupational prestige, and her spouse's earnings. However, consistent with past research, men experience no negative effects of body mass on economic outcomes. Age splits show that it is among younger adults where BMI effects are most robust, lending support to the interpretation that it is BMI causing occupational outcomes and not the reverse.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11343

Click on PDF or submit your email address for full text.

B. School Quality, Neighborhoods and Housing Prices: The Impacts of school Desegregation by Thomas J. Kane, Douglas O. Staiger, and Stephanie K. Riegg (w11347, May 2005, .pdf format, 56p.).

Abstract:

We study the relationship between school characteristics and housing prices in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina between 1994 and 2001. During this period, the school district was operating under a court-imposed desegregation order and redrew a number of school boundaries. We use two different sources of variation to disentangle the effect of schools and other neighborhood characteristics: differences in housing prices along assignment zone boundaries and changes in housing prices following the change in school assignments. We find systematic differences in house prices along school boundaries, although the impact of schools is only one-quarter as large as the naive cross-sectional estimates would imply. Moreover, house prices seem to react to changes in school assignments. Part of the impact of school assignments is mediated by subsequent changes in the characteristics of the population living in the school zone.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11347

Click on PDF or submit your email address for full text.

C. "An Investigation of the Effects of Alcohol Consumption and Alcohol Policies on Youth Risky Sexual Behaviors," by Sara Markowitz, Robert Kaestner, Michael Grossman (Working Paper w11378, May 2005, .pdf format, 13p.).

Abstract:

The problems of teen pregnancy, HIV/AIDS and the high rates of other sexually transmitted diseases among youth have lead to widespread concern with the sexual behaviors of teenagers. Alcohol use is one of the most commonly cited correlates of risky sexual behavior. The purpose of this research is to investigate the causal role of alcohol in determining sexual activity and risky sexual behavior among teenagers and young adults. This research also addresses the question of whether there are public policies that can reduce the risky sexual behavior that results in harmful consequences. Individual and aggregate level data are used to investigate these questions. Results show that alcohol use appears to have no causal influence in determining whether or not a teenage has sex. However, alcohol use may lower contraception use among sexually active teens.

Click on PDF or submit your email address for full text.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11378

D. "Religious Market Structure, Religious Participation, and Outcomes: Is Religion Good for You?" by Jonathan Gruber (Working Paper w11377, May 2005, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

Religion plays an important role in the lives of many Americans, but there is relatively little study by economists of the implications of religiosity for economic outcomes. This likely reflects the enormous difficulty inherent in separating the causal effects of religiosity from other factors that are correlated with outcomes. In this paper, I propose a potential solution to this long standing problem, by noting that a major determinant of religious participation is religious market density, or the share of the population in an area which is of an individual's religion. I make use of the fact that exogenous predictions of market density can be formed based on area ancestral mix. That is, I relate religious participation and economic outcomes to the correlation of the religious preference of one's own heritage with the religious preference of other heritages that share one's area. I use the General Social Survey (GSS) to model the impact of market density on church attendance, and micro-data from the 1990 Census to model the impact on economic outcomes. I find that a higher market density leads to a significantly increased level of religious participation, and as well to better outcomes according to several key economic indicators: higher levels of education and income, lower levels of welfare receipt and disability, higher levels of marriage, and lower levels of divorce.

Click on PDF or submit your email address for full text.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11377
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East-West Center: "Japan's Baby Bust: Causes, Implications, and Policy Responses," by Robert D. Retherford and Naohiro Ogawa (East-West Center Working Papers, Population Series No. 118, April 2005, .pdf format, 44 p.).

Abstract:

This paper describes the trend in fertility in Japan, analyzes the causes Jand implications of the baby bust after 1973, and discusses the Japanese government's efforts to raise fertility, which by 2003 had fallen to 1.29 children (i.e., births) per woman, as indicated by the total fertility rate. Also addressed are the questions of why the government's efforts to raise fertility have not been effective and what additional steps the government might take.

http://www.eastwestcenter.org/stored/pdfs/POPwp118.pdf
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Population Council:

A. "Education of adult children and mortality of their elderly parents in Taiwan," by Zimmer, Zachary, Linda G. Martin, Mary Beth Ofstedal, and Yi-Li Chuang (Working Paper 199, May 2005, .pdf format, 24p.).

Abstract:

Research shows an older adult's education is strongly associated with mortality. But in societies such as Taiwan, where families are highly integrated, the education of family members may be linked to survival. Such may be the case in settings where there are large gaps in levels of education across generations and high levels of resource transfers between family members. This study employs 14 years of longitudinal data from Taiwan to examine the combined effects of education of older adults and their adult children on mortality outcomes of older adults. Nested Gompertz hazard models are used to evaluate the importance of education of an older adult and their highest-educated child after controlling for socioeconomic, demographic, and health characteristics. To gain further insight, additional models stratify results by whether older adults report serious chronic health conditions. Results indicate that educational levels of both parent and child are associated with older adult mortality, but the child's education is more important when a) controlling for the health of the older adult, and b) when examining only those older adults who already report a serious chronic condition, suggesting different roles for education in onset versus progression of a health disorder that may lead to death.

http://www.popcouncil.org/publications/wp/prd/199.html

B. "The impact of childhood mortality on fertility in six rural thanas of Bangladesh," by Hossain, Mian Bazle, James F. Phillips, and Thomas K. LeGrand (Working Paper No. 198, May 2005, .pdf format, p.).

Abstract:

This paper examines the causal structure of the relationship between child mortality events and subsequent fertility with an analysis of prospective longitudinal data on births and childhood deaths occurring to nearly 8,000 mothers observed in Bangladesh over the 1982-93 period, a time of rapid decline in fertility. Generalized hazard-regression analyses are employed to assess the effect of infant and child mortality on the hazard of conception, controlling for birth order and maternal age and educational attainment. Results show that childhood mortality increases the hazard of birth-interval closure if the death occurs in the index interval, representing the combined effect of biological and volitional replacement. Substantial birth-interval effects are also evident if the death occurs during a prior birth interval, signifying a volitional replacement effect alone. Moreover, mortality effects in prior birth intervals are consistent with the hypothesis of insurance effects. Interaction of replacement with elapsed time suggests that the volitional impact of child mortality increases as the demographic transition progresses. This volitional effect interacts with sex of the index child. Investigation of higher-order interactions suggests that this gender-replacement effect has not changed with time.

http://www.popcouncil.org/publications/wp/prd/198.html
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Penn State Population Research Institute:

A. "Risks to Quality of Life in a Large Cohort of Adult Cancer Survivors," by Pamela Farley Short, Joseph J. Vasey, Michael Markowski, James R. Zabora, Gregory R. Harper, and Witold B. Rybka (WP 05-01, January 2005, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

Purpose: To make a multi-dimensional assessment of health-related quality of life (QoL) in a recent, heterogeneous cohort of adult cancer survivors. To identify risk factors predicting differences in QoL, including socioeconomic status and cancer site.

Patients and Methods: The sample included 1763 working-age survivors diagnosed with different cancers from 1997 to 1999. A telephone interview asked retrospectively about life circumstances before diagnosis and measured QoL at interview. Age/sex-adjusted QoL for survivors was compared to population norms. Multivariate analyses predicted SF-12 physical and mental health, BSI-18 psychological distress, work disability, and labor force participation from demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical characteristics. Participation biases were modeled and assessed.

Results: The adjusted mean of physical health for survivors was 0.23±0.07 standard deviations below the population mean. Mental health and psychological distress were similar to population averages. Labor force participation dropped 12 percentage points from cancer diagnosis to follow up. Nineteen percent of survivors reported cancer-related limitations in ability to work. Twenty-three percent had problems getting insurance to pay for cancer care. Twenty-seven percent of policyholders remained in a job because of health insurance concerns. Higher socioeconomic status was associated with better QoL. Differences in QoL by cancer site generally followed differences in survival rates.

Conclusions: Quality of life, measured 2-3 years after diagnosis for most subjects, was generally high. However, QoL varied with a number of factors. These risk factors should be considered in screening for QoL deficits, deploying clinical and psychosocial services for survivors, and modifying treatments to produce even better QoL outcomes.

http://www.pop.psu.edu/general/pubs/working_papers/psu-pri/wp0501.pdf

B. "Disaster, Population and Poverty Dynamics among Bangladeshi Households," by Anuja Jayaraman and Jill L. Findeis (WP 05-02, April 2005, .pdf format, 26p.).

http://www.pop.psu.edu/general/pubs/working_papers/psu-pri/wp0502.pdf

C. "Multistate Cohort Models with Proportional Transfer Rates," by Robert Schoen and Vladimir Canudas-Romo (WP 05-03, May 2005, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

We present a new, broadly applicable approach to summarizing the over time behavior of a cohort as it moves through a variety of statuses (or states). The approach is based on the assumption that all rates of transfer maintain a constant ratio to one another over age. We present closed form expressions for the size and state composition of the cohort at every age, and provide expressions for other useful summary measures. The state trajectories, or life course schematics, shown in Figures 1 and 3, depict all of the possible size and state configurations that the cohort can exhibit as it moves along its life course under the specified pattern of transfer rates. The two living state case and hierarchical multistate models with any number of living states are analyzed in detail. Applying our approach to fertility data for the United States, 1997, we find that observed rates of parity progression are roughly proportional over age. Our Proportional Transfer Rate (PTR) approach provides trajectories by parity state and facilitates analyses of the implications of changes in parity rate levels and patterns. A noteworthy substantive finding is that increases in parity progression rates to parities 4 and above have little effect on a cohort's Total Fertility Rate, while changes in childlessness have a substantial impact.

http://www.pop.psu.edu/general/pubs/working_papers/psu-pri/wp0503.pdf
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University of Michigan Population Studies Center: "Interstate Migration of Hispanics, Asians and Blacks: Cultural Constraints and Middle Class Flight," by William H. Frey and Kao-Lee Liaw (PSC Research Report No. 05-575, May 2005, .pdf format, 40p.).

Abstract:

This report utilizes 2000 Census migration data to assess the role of race-ethnicity as part of inter-state migration within the United States. The rising prominence of immigrant minorities, Hispanics and Asians, as well as blacks in the US population, and their changing dispersal patterns, calls for explicit attention to their roles in inter-state migration. The analysis employs maps, graphs, descriptive statistics and a nested logit migration model that evaluates residents' departures from origin states, and migrants' selections of destination states over the 1995-2000 period. The analysis focuses on two themes: First, we assess the role of "cultural constraints" as they affect departures and destination selections for different race-ethnic groups. These constraints shape migration patterns for these groups due to their needs for social support networks, kinship ties, and access to informal employment opportunities that tend to be available in areas that house large concentrations of co-ethnics. For both the departure and destination selection parts of the migration process, we find that a concentration of co-ethnics in a state serves to deter potential out-migrants and to attract potential new migrants. There is also evidence of spatial assimilation in that cultural constraints are less pronounced in the destination selections for the more educated Hispanic, Black, and Asian migrants. Second, we examine the impacts that low-skilled immigration and high housing costs exert on domestic out-migration from urbanized, high immigration states. Our earlier research indicated that the former factor affected a low skilled "white flight." However, more recently, high housing costs, along with more racially diverse populations in these areas, suggest that the latter may be promoting a more multiethnic "middle class flight". Our results support this interpretation by showing accentuated out-migration and reduced destination selections of less educated migrants among all race-ethnic groups for states with high housing values and high levels of foreign born immigration. Dataset(s): 2000 US Census 5% PUMS files

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.html?ID=3223
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Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis: "Culture: An Empirical Investigation of Beliefs, Work, and Fertility," by Raquel Fernandez and Alessandra Fogli (Staff Report 361, April 2005, .pdf and PostScript format, 33p.).

Abstract:

We study the effect of culture on important economic outcomes by using the 1970 census to examine the work and fertility behavior of women born in the U.S. but whose parents were born elsewhere. We use past female labor force participation and total fertility rates from the country of ancestry as our cultural proxies. These variables should capture, in addition to past economic and institutional conditions, the beliefs commonly held about the role of women in society (i.e., culture). Given the different time and place, only the beliefs embodied in the cultural proxies should be potentially relevant. We show that these cultural proxies have positive and significant explanatory power for individual work and fertility outcomes, even after controlling for possible indirect effects of culture. We examine alternative hypotheses for these positive correlations and show that neither unobserved human capital nor networks are likely to be responsible.

http://minneapolisfed.org/research/common/pub_detail.cfm?pb_autonum_id=1031
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Department of Economics [Vanderbilt University]: " Evaluating the Role of Brown vs. Board of Education in School Equalization, Desegregation, and the Income of African-Americans," by Orley Ashenfelter, William J. Collins, and Albert Yoon (Working Paper No. 05-W15, May 2005, .pdf format, 36p.).

Abstract:

In this paper we study the long-term labor market implications of school resource equalization before Brown and school desegregation after Brown. For cohorts born in the South in the 1920s and 1930s, we find that racial disparities in measurable school characteristics had a substantial influence on black males' earnings and educational attainment measured in 1970, albeit one that was smaller in the later cohorts. When we examine the income of male workers in 1990, we find that southern-born blacks who finished their schooling just before effective desegregation occurred in the South fared poorly compared to southern-born blacks who followed behind them in school by just a few years.

http://www.vanderbilt.edu/Econ/wparchive/abstracts/vu05-w15.html

Click on "Article" for full text.
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Yale University Economic Growth Center: "Inter-household Allocations within Extended Family: Evidence from the Indonesia Family Life Survey," by Firman Witoelar (Discussion Paper 912, May 2005, .pdf format, 47p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses data from two waves of the Indonesia Family Life Survey (IFLS2-1997 and IFLS3-2000) to investigate whether households that belong to the same extended families pool their income to smooth their consumption. We exploit the fact that the survey also tracks and interviews split-off households during the follow-up surveys, enabling us to construct a panel of extended families. The findings suggest that in contradiction to the null hypothesis of extended-family income pooling, household own income still matters to household consumption even after controlling for extended family resources. The result stands after correcting for potential measurement error and endogeneity of income. More importantly, the findings also suggest that although the change in household own income matters to the change in household consumption, controlling for extended family resources, the magnitudes of the coefficients are small. We also find evidence that household consumption is affected by characteristics of other households in the same extended family.

http://www.econ.yale.edu/growth_pdf/cdp912.pdf
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Luxembourg Income Study: LIS has released the following working papers. Links to full text (.pdf format) along with abstracts can be found at the sites:

A. No. 399. Familialism and Welfare Regimes: Poverty, Employment and Family Policies, by Joya Misra and Stephanie Moller (January 2005, 53p.).

No. 400. Rising Inequality and the Politics of Redistribution in Affluent Countries, by Lane Kenworthy and Jonas Pontusson (January 2005, 44p.).

http://www.lisproject.org/publications/wpapersh.htm

B. No. 401. The Impact of Taxes and Transfer Payments on the Distribution of Income: A Parametric Comparison, by Samuel R. Dastrup, Rachel Hartshorn, and James B. McDonald (January 2005, 22p.).

No. 402. Electoral Systems, Poverty and Income Inequality, by Darwin Ugarte Ontivaros and Vincenzo Verardi (February 2005, 14p.).

No. 403. Families at the Margins of the Welfare State: A Comparative Study on the Prevalence of Poverty among Families Receiving Social Assistance, by Susan Kuivalainen (February 2005, 19p.).

No. 404. Market Economic Systems, by Frederic L. Pryor (October 2004, 43p.).

No. 405. Child Poverty and Changes in Child Poverty in Rich Countries since 1990, by Wen-Hao Chen and Miles Corak (January 2005, 63p.).

No. 406. Principles and Practicalities for Measuring Child Poverty in Rich Countries, by Miles Corak (March 2005, 66p.).

No. 407. Structural Theory and Relative Poverty in Rich Western Democracies, 1969-2000, by David Brady (March 2005, 53p.).

No. 408. Welfare States, Social Structure and the Dynamics of Poverty Rates: A Comparative Study of 16 Countries, 1980-2000, by Olaf Backman (February 2005, 27p.).

No. 409. The Material Consequences of Welfare States: Benefit Generosity and Absolute Poverty in 16 OECD Countries, by Lyle Scruggs and James P. Allen (April 2005, 35p.).

http://www.lisproject.org/publications/wpapersi.htm
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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "How Does Marriage Affect Physical and Psychological Health? A Survey of the Longitudinal Evidence," by Chris M. Wilson and Andrew J. Oswald (Discussion Paper No. 1619, May 2005, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

This paper examines an accumulating modern literature on the health benefits of relationships like marriage. Although much remains to be understood about the physiological channels, we draw the judgment, after looking across many journals and disciplines, that there is persuasive longitudinal evidence for such effects. The size of the health gain from marriage is remarkable. It may be as large as the benefit from giving up smoking.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1619.pdf

B. "Does Parental Leave Affect Fertility and Return-to-Work? Evidence from a "True Natural Experiment"," by Rafael Lalive and Josef Zweimüller (Discussion Paper No. 1613, May 2005, .pdf format, 25p.).

Abstract:

We study the causal effects of changes in parental leave provisions on fertility and return-to-work behavior. We exploit a policy change that took place in 1990 in Austria which extended the maximum duration of parental leave from the child's first to the child's second birthday. As parental leave benefits can be automatically renewed when a new mother is still on leave from a previous child, this created a strong incentive to "bunch" the time off work in case of multiple planned children and/or to increase fertility. We study the quantitative effect of this incentive using an empirical strategy which resembles a true experimental set-up very closely. In particular, assignment to treatment is random and treated and controls face (almost) identical environmental conditions. We find that treated mothers have a 4.9 percentage points (or 15 percent) higher probability to get an additional child within the following three years; and a 3.9 percentage points higher probability in the following ten years. This suggests that not only the timing but also the number of children were affected by the policy change. We also find that parental leave rules have a strong effect on mothers' return-to-work behavior. Per additional months of maximum parental leave duration, mothers' time off work is reduced by 0.4 to 0.5 months. The effects of a subsequent policy change in 1996 when maximum parental leave duration was reduced from the child's second birthday to the date when the child became 18 months old brought about no change in fertility behavior, but a labor supply effect that is comparable in magnitude to the one generated by the 1990 policy change. This can be rationalized by the incentives created through automatic benefit renewal.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1613.pdf

C. "Student Flows and Migration: An Empirical Analysis by Axel Dreher and Panu Poutvaara (Discussion Paper No. 1612, May 2005, .pdf format, 23p.).

Abstract:

Using panel data for 78 countries of origin we examine the impact of student flows to the United States on subsequent migration there over the period 1971-2001. What we find is that the stock of foreign students is an important predictor of subsequent migration. This holds true whether or not the lagged endogenous variable is included. The relationship is robust to the inclusion of time and country dummies, and remains when we account for outliers. The basic results also hold for a cross section of 36 countries of origin and 9 host countries. Our results have important policy implications which we discuss in the last section.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1612.pdf
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Institute for Social and Economic Research (University of Essex, Colchester, UK): "Methods for Summarising and Comparing Wealth Distributions," by Stephen P. Jenkins and Markus Jantti (WP 2005-05, May 2005, .pdf format, 40p.).

Abstract:

This paper reviews methods for summarizing and comparing wealth distributions. We show that many of the tools commonly used to summarize income distributions can also be applied to wealth distributions, albeit adapted in order to account for the distinctive features of wealth distributions: zero and negative wealth values; spikes in density at or around zero; right-skewness with long and sparse tails combined with non-trivial prevalence of extreme values. Illustrations are provided using data for Finland.

http://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/pubs/workpaps/pdf/2005-05.pdf

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TABLES OF CONTENTS:

Other Journals:

American Journal of Sociology (Vol. 110, No. 5, March 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJS/journal/contents/v110n5.html

American Journal of Public Health (Vol. 95, No. 6, June, 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.ajph.org/content/vol95/issue6/

Journal of Human Resources (vol. 40 no. 2, 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/jhr/toc2005.html

Scroll to relevant issue.

Urban Affairs Review (Vol. 40, No. 6, July 2005).

http://uar.sagepub.com/content/vol40/issue6/

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CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS:

University of Essex (Colchester, UK): "38th Annual Essex Summer School in =Social Science Data Analysis and Collection," to be held Jul. 11-19, 2005. For more information see:

http://www.essex.ac.uk/methods/

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DATA:

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR): ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Survey of Program Dynamics (SPD), 2001: Cross-Sectional File (#3806)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03806.xml

Schools and Staffing Survey, 1999-2000: [United States] (#4133)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04133.xml

County-Specific Net Migration by Five-Year Age Groups, Hispanic Origin, Race, and Sex, 1990-2000 (#4171)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04171.xml

Globalization Comparative Panel Dataset, 1975-1995 (#4172)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04172.xml

Westernization Comparative Panel Dataset, 1975-1995 (#4173)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04173.xml
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IPUMS: "The Minnesota Population Center is delighted to announce the first release of a nationally representative microdata sample of the 1930 U.S. census. The 1930 IPUMS sample represents the capstone of a fifteen-year effort to create an integrated census database describing the American population from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. The IPUMS now includes individual-level samples for every surviving census from 1850 through 2000. The current 1930 data release is a 1-in-500 sample. The MPC plans to release the final 1-in-100 sample in 2007. The data is currently available via the IPUMS-USA beta site."

https://beta.ipums.org/usa/index.html
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NLS Web Investigator Update:

The Bureau of Labor Statistics National Longitudinal Study has updated its NLS Web Investigator data extraction system. For details see:

http://www.chrr.ohio-state.edu/nls-info/ordering/display_db.php3

NLS Web Investigator:

http://www.nlsinfo.org/web-investigator/index.php
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Luxembourg Income Study: New data is available for Spain (1995 and 2000).

http://www.lisproject.org/techdoc/es/esindex.htm

More information about data access:

http://www.lisproject.org/dataccess.htm

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu