Current Demographic Research Report #81, May 2, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau News Release
National Center for Health Statistics Report
National Center for Education Statistics Issue Brief
Bureau of Labor Statistics Periodical, News Release
DHHS ASPE Brief
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Report
National Criminal Justice Research Service Report
United Nations Children's Fund Report
UNESCAP Report
OECD Press Release
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Reports
Canadian Institute for Health Information Report
Statistics South Africa Report
UK Office of National Statistics Report
Institute of Medicine Monograph
Population Reference Bureau Report
Urban Institute Reports
Kaiser Family Foundation Issue Brief
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Report
Woodrow Wilson School Report
MDRC Report
_New England Journal of Medicine_ Extracts
_British Medical Journal_ Article Abstract
Info Health Pop. Reporter
NLS Bibliography Updates

WORKING PAPERS

California Center for Population Research
University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty
Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
National Bureau of Economic Research
University of Washington Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology
Princeton University Center for Health and Well-Being
CERGE
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta
Other Journals

CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS

Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

Bureau of Justice Statistics

DATA

Census Bureau
Bureau of Justice Statistics

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REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.:

Census Bureau News Release: "Census Bureau Selects Texas County for 2010 Census Test," (CB05-CT.02, May 2, 2005).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/census_2010/004762.html
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National Center for Health Statistics Report: "Health Characteristics of the American Indian and Alaska Native Adult Population: United States, 1999-2003," by Patricia M. Barnes, Patricia F. Adams, and Eve Powell-Griner (Advance Data From Vital and Health Statistics No.356, April 2005, .pdf format, 24p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/ad/ad356.pdf
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National Center for Education Statistics Issue Brief: "Reasons for Adults' Participation in Work-Related Courses, 2002-03," by Matthew DeBell and Gail Mulligan (NCES 2005088, May 2005, .pdf format, 3p.).

Abstract:

This Issue Brief uses nationally representative data from the Adult Education for Work-related Reasons Survey of the 2003 National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES) to examine the reasons that adults participate in formal educational courses for work-related reasons. More than 90 percent of adults who took such courses in 2002-03 reported doing so in order to maintain or improve skills or knowledge they already had. Among employed adults, the majority took courses because their employer required or recommended participation, while about a fifth did so in order to get a promotion or pay raise. The likelihood of taking classes for the selected reasons examined in this Brief generally varied by participants' age, education, employment status, occupation, and household income.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005088
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Bureau of Labor Statistics Periodical, News Release:

A. _Compensation and Working Conditions Online, April 2005_. The latest articles are dated Apr. 25, 2005.

http://www.bls.gov/opub/cwc/home.htm

B. "Employment Experience of Youths: Results from a Longitudinal Survey" (Apr. 28, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 11p.).

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/nlsyth.toc.htm
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Department of Health and Human Services, Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation Brief: "Child Care Eligibility and Enrollment Estimates for Fiscal Year 2003," (April 2005, .pdf and HTML format, 8p.).

http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/05/cc-elig-est03/index.htm
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Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Report:

A. "Trends in Children's Antibiotic Use: 1996 to 2001," by G. Edward Miller and William A. Carroll (Research Findings #23, April 2005, .pdf and HTML format, 22p.).

Summary:

This report uses nationally representative data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) to examine antibiotic use by U.S. children for the years 1996-2001. From 1996 to 2001, the proportion of children who used an antibiotic during the year declined from 39.0 percent to 29.0 percent and the average number of antibiotic prescriptions for children declined from 0.9 to 0.5 per child. Use of antibiotics in the treatment of otitis media also declined. The proportion of all children for whom an antibiotic was prescribed to treat otitis media fell from 14.4 percent in 1996 to 11.5 percent in 2001. Trends in antibiotic use for subgroups of children defined by age, race/ethnicity, sex, income, insurance status, health status, and geography are also examined. From 1996-97 to 2000-01, the percentage of children with antibiotic use and the average number of prescriptions declined in each of the population subgroups under consideration.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=683

B. "Access to Needed Medical Care among Children under 18 Years of Age with Special Health Care Needs, 2002," by Frances M. Chevarley (Statistics Brief #75, April 2005, .pdf format, 8p.).

Summary:

This Statistical Brief examines the quality of health care for children with and without special health care needs (SHCN) as it pertains to getting needed care in 2002. The estimates provided in the brief reflect getting needed care as it is defined and reported by the parent or knowledgeable adult respondent to the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-HC).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=684
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National Criminal Justice Research Service Report: "Economic Costs of Drug Abuse in the United States, 1992-2002," (NCJ 207303, April 2005, .pdf and HTML format, 110p.).

http://www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/publications/economic_costs/
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United Nations Children's Fund Report: "Progress for Children: A Report Card on Gender Parity and Primary Education" (Gender Parity and Primary Education: Number 2, April 2005, .pdf format, 30p.).

http://www.unicef.org/progressforchildren/2005n2/
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United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Report: "Gender Equality and Empowerment: A Statistical Profile of the ESCAP region" (February 2005, .pdf format, 32p.).

Abstract:

The current gender situation in the Asia-Pacific region is described through a small set of statistical indicators. Insight into individual indicators across the region can be obtained from the dataset in the comparative tables in Annex 1. The publication was prepared to assist the regional appraisal of the Beijing Platform for Action and the Beijing+10 global review on the occasion of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, forty-ninth session, New York, March 2005

http://www.unescap.org/publications/detail.asp?id=1042
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Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Press Release:"OECD launches sites for each of its member countries on www.oecd.org," (April 20, 2005).

http://www.oecd.org/document/39/0,2340,en_2649_201185_34763687_1_1_1_1,00.html
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Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Reports:

A. "The 2004 National Drug Strategy Household Survey" (Drug Statistics Series No. 13, April 2005, .pdf format, 141p.).

Abstract:

The 2004 National Drug Strategy Household Survey: First Results Presents summary data collected in Australia's most comprehensive national survey on drug issues. Key results on drug-related awareness, knowledge, attitudes and behaviour are features of this report. Comparisons with 1991, 1993, 1995, 1998 and 2001 surveys are presented and population estimates of the numbers of consumers of both licit and illicit substances are also provided. This report is the 13th in the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare's Drug Statistics Series. Future reports in the series will cover extended analysis of the 2004 results and a comprehensive summary of major drug use statistical collections. This report and others in the series are useful resources for policy-makers, researchers and professionals interested in drug-related issues.

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10122

B. "Health System Expenditure of Disease and Injury in Australia 2000-01" (Health and Welfare Expenditure Series No. 21, April 2005, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

The report provides an overview of total health system expenditures on disease and injury in Australia during 2000-01, based on the best possible estimates from currently available data sources. To maximise the validity of comparison between diseases, similar methods are used in estimating each disease.

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10128

C. "A Picture of Australia's Children," (AIHW Cat. No. PHE-58, May 2005, .pdf format, 120p.).

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10127
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Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI)/Institut Canadien d'Information sur la Sante Report: "Drug Expenditure in Canada 1985 to 2004," (National Health Expenditure Database, April 2005, .pdf format 145p.). Note: CIHI requires free registration before providing reports.

http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/dispPage.jsp?cw_page=PG_375_E&cw_topic=375&cw_rel=AR_80_E
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Statistics South Africa Report: "Marriages and Divorces 2002" (P0307, April 2005, .pdf format, 32p.).

http://www.statssa.gov.za/Publications/P0307/P03072002.pdf
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UK Office of National Statistics Report: "Key Population and Vital Statistics: Local and Health Authority Areas," (Series VS No. 30, PP1 No. 26, 2005, .pdf format, 119p.).

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/downloads/theme_population/KPVS30_2003/KPVS2003.pdf
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Institute of Medicine Monograph: _WIC Food Packages: Time for a Change_ (National Academies Press, 2005, OpenBook format, 324p.). Note: Ordering information for a print copy is available at the site. The monograph is linked to from a National Academies news release: "Changes Needed in the WIC Program to Provide More Whole Grains, Fruits, Vegetables; Revisions Will Not Raise Program's Food Costs" (Apr. 27, 2005).

http://www4.nationalacademies.org/news.nsf/isbn/0309096502?OpenDocument
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Population Reference Bureau Report: "Women in 2005: Are They Making Progress?" by Lori Ashford (March 2005, HTML format, with accompanying data sheet .pdf format, 12p., and slide show, Microsoft PowerPoint format).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/05_Articles/Women_in_2005__Are_They_Making_Progress_.htm
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Urban Institute Reports:

A. "The Conflict Between Marriage Promotion Initiatives for Cohabiting Couples with Children and Marriage Penalties in Tax and Transfer Programs," by Gregory Acs and Elaine Maag (New Federalism: National Survey of America's Families B-66, April 2005, .pdf format, 7p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311162

B. "Uninsured Americans with Chronic Health Conditions," by Amy J. Davidoff and Genevieve M. Kenney(May 2005, .pdf format, 22p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411161
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Kaiser Family Foundation/Allan Guttmacher Institute Issue Brief: "Medicaid: A Critical Source of Support for Family Planning in the United States" (April 2005, .pdf format, 11p.).

http://www.kff.org/womenshealth/7064-02.cfm
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Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Report: "Characteristics of the Uninsured: A View from the States," (April 2005, .pdf format, 49p.).

http://www.rwjf.org/research/researchdetail.jsp?id=1882&ia=132

Click on "View the full-text" at the bottom of the page.

Press Release:

http://www.rwjf.org/newsroom/newsreleasesdetail.jsp?id=10347
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Research Program in Development Studies and Center for Health and Wellbeing, Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University Report: "The Great Escape: A Review Essay on Fogel~Rs _The Escape from Hunger and Premature Death, 1700-2100_, by Angus Deaton (April 2005, .pdf format, 17p.).

http://www.wws.princeton.edu/%7Erpds/downloads/deaton_essayonfogel.pdf
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MDRC Report: "Effects of Welfare and Employment Policies on Young Children," by Pamela A. Morris, Lisa A. Gennetian, and Greg J. Duncan (Society for Research on Child Development's Social Policy Report, Volume XIX, Number II, 2005, .pdf format, 20p.).

Summary:

Over the past 30 years, welfare and other public programs for poor families have focused increasingly on promoting parents' self-sufficiency by requiring and supporting employment. Evidence from a diverse set of random-assignment experiments now reveals some of the conditions under which promoting work among low-income, single parents helps or hurts children. This report summarizes the results of recent research conducted as part of the Next Generation Project, a collaboration between researchers at MDRC and several leading research universities, which draws on data from welfare and employment experiments launched in the early 1990s aimed at increasing the self-sufficiency of low-income parents in the U.S. and Canada. In addition to providing evidence for policy makers to assess evolving welfare policies, this research helps advance our understanding of the effects of parents' economic circumstances and child care arrangements on the development of low-income children.

http://www.mdrc.org/publications/407/abstract.html

Click on "Full Report" for link to full text.
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_New England Journal of Medicine_ Perspectives Extract, Book Review Extract:

A. "Public Access to NIH-Funded Research," by Robert Steinbrook (_NEJM_ Perspective, Vol. 352, No. 17, Apr. 28, 2005, p. 1739-1741).

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/extract/352/17/1739

B. _When Germs Travel: Six Major Epidemics That Have Invaded America Since 1900 and the Fears They Have Unleashed_, by Howard Markel, reviewed by Alfred O. Berg ((_NEJM_ Book Review, Vol. 352, No. 17, Apr. 28, 2005, p. 1828-1829).

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/extract/352/17/1828-a
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_British Medical Journal_ Article Abstract: "Modified Mediterranean diet and survival: EPIC-elderly prospective cohort study," by Antonia Trichopoulou, Philippos Orfanos, Teresa Norat, Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Marga C. Ocké, Petra H. M. Peeters, Yvonne T. van der Schouw, Heiner Boeing, Kurt Hoffmann, Paolo Boffetta, Gabriele Nagel, Giovanna Masala, Vittorio Krogh, Salvatore Panico, Rosario Tumino, Paolo Vineis, Christina Bamia, Androniki Naska, Vassiliki Benetou, Pietro Ferrari, Nadia Slimani, Guillem Pera, Carmen Martinez-Garcia, Carmen Navarro, Miguel Rodriguez-Barranco, Miren Dorronsoro, Elizabeth A. Spencer, Timothy J. Key, Sheila Bingham, Kay-Tee Khaw, Emmanuelle Kesse, Francoise Clavel-Chapelon, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Goran Berglund, Elisabet Wirfalt, Goran Hallmans, Ingegerd Johansson, Anne Tjonneland, Anja Olsen, Kim Overvad, Heidi H. Hundborg, Elio Riboli, and Dimitrios Trichopoulos (_British Medical Journal_, vol. 330, no. 7498, April 30, 2005, .pdf and HTML format, p. 991-994).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/abstract/330/7498/991
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Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (vol. 5, no. 18, May. 2, 2005). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/
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NLS Bibliography Updates: Note: These citations, along with all of the NLS bibliography, can be found at:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/

Note: Where available, direct links to full text have been provided. These references represent updated citations from Apr. 18 - Apr. 29, 2005.

For more information on any of these citations (selected abstracts are available) go to the above listed address and click on "Title List". Click on the first item, which will give the syntax of the citation urls:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/qtitle.php3?myrow[0]=320

Then change the number after the equal sign (320 in this case) to the number listed as the "ID Number" in the citations below. You will be taken to the full citation listing.

QUESNEL-VALEE, AMELIE
Is it Really Worse to Have Public Health Insurance Than to Have No Insurance at
All? Health Insurance and Adult Health in the United States
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 45,4 (December 2004): 376-392
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4941
Publisher: American Sociological Association

WINSLOW, SARAH
She Earns, He Earns: Exploring Race and Class Variation in Wives' Contributions to Couples' Income
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4942
Publisher: Population Association of America

KOHLER, HANS-PETER
RODGERS, JOSEPH LEE
SKYTTHE, AXEL
Subjective Well-Being, Fertility and Partnerships: A Biodemographic Perspective
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4943
Publisher: Population Association of America

BULANDA, RONALD E.
Beyond Provisions: The Relationship between Poverty and Parenting among Single Mothers
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4944
Publisher: Population Association of America

GRYN, THOMAS A.
Effects of Relationship Transitions and Paternal Residency on Fathering
Salience: Evidence from the NLSY79
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4945
Publisher: Population Association of America

HEILAND, FRANK
Does the Birth Order Affect the Cognitive Development of a Child?
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4946
Publisher: Population Association of America

NONOYAMA, ATSUKO
SIMPSON, PIPPA
GOSSETT, JEFFREY M.
STOKES, C. SHANNON
Maternal Employment in Early Childhood and the Risk of Overweight in Adolescence
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4947
Publisher: Population Association of America

MUSICK, KELLY
ENGLAND, PAULA S.
Class and Education Differences in Planned and Unplanned Fertility
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4948
Publisher: Population Association of America

QUESNEL-VALLEE, AMELIE
Does Health Insurance Coverage Mitigate or Exacerbate Socioeconomic Inequities in Health in the U.S.?
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4949
Publisher: Population Association of America

ARGYS, LAURA M.
REES, DANIEL I.
Searching for Peer Group Effects: A Test of the Contagion Hypothesis
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4950
Publisher: Population Association of America

MAMUN, ARIF
"The White Picket Fence Dream": Effects of Assets on the Choice of Family Union
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4951
Publisher: Population Association of America

RODGERS, JOSEPH L.
BARD, DAVID
Modeling NLSY Fertility Patterns Longitudinally and Biometrically:
Evolutionary, Genetic, and Social Interpretations
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4952
Publisher: Population Association of America

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WORKING PAPERS:

California Center for Population Research (CCPR): "Observations on the Design and Implementation of Sample Surveys in China," by Donald J. Treiman, William M. Mason, Yao Lu, Yi Pan, Yaqiang Qi, and Shige Song (CCPR-006-05, April 2005, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

Surveys in China conventionally sample from local area residential registers, which until recently have been of sufficient accuracy to function as de facto population registers. Due to a combination of large scale internal migration and massive replacement of housing in urban areas, a large fraction of the population currently does not live where registered. Individuals not living where registered are thus ineligible for inclusion in conventionally generated samples. Surveys whose samples depend on access to residential registers are inherently based on an under-enumeration of the population, as well as on a biased representation of the population due to exclusion of unregistered local residents. We report conclusions from, and observations related to, a pilot study designed to test the feasibility and effectiveness of a sampling method that does not depend on residential registers. In the pilot we (1) purposively selected small areas; (2) enumerated the small areas; (3) randomly sampled individuals from the enumeration lists; and (4) interviewed sampled individuals. This approach substantially reduced the underenumeration problem. As implemented, however, its point of departure required previously selected small areas. We describe an extension designed to achieve full coverage of the population of China through sampling of small areas as the penultimate stage of a multi-stage design.

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/ccpr_006_05.asp
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University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty:

A. "Knowledge of Child Support Policy Rules: How Little We Know," by Maria Cancian, Daniel R. Meyer, and Kisun Nam (Discussion Paper DP 1297-05, April 2005, .pdf format, 24p.).

Abstract:

There is surprisingly limited information on how much individuals know about the policy rules that could affect them, either in general or in evaluations of new programs. In this article we examine the level of knowledge that participants in a Wisconsin child support and welfare demonstration had about child support policy rules. We find very low levels of knowledge. Our results suggest that people tend to learn policy rules by experience; we find less consistent support for knowledge being primarily imparted through interactions with caseworkers. Implications of the lack of participants' knowledge for policy evaluations are discussed.

http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp129705.pdf

B. "Child Support in the United States: An Uncertain and Irregular Income Source?" by Maria Cancian and Daniel R. Meyer (Discussion Paper DP 1298-05, April 2005, .pdf format, 22p.).

Abstract:

In all developed countries, single-parent families are particularly vulnerable to poverty. In contrast to many European countries that provide some guaranteed income support for children, the United States has emphasized private responsibility, increasingly requiring child support from the other parent. The reliance on a private approach raises several questions concerning the adequacy and distribution of child support. Using detailed administrative records for virtually all mothers with new child support orders in one U.S. state in 2000, we analyze child support receipts over the subsequent three years. We find that most mothers with child support orders receive support, and many receive substantial amounts. However, the amount received varies substantially from year to year. Moreover, we find substantial instability within years--a characteristic of private support that has been difficult to measure with prior data. Our analysis of child support outcomes across the income distribution shows remarkably similar proportions of families receiving at least some support. Considering amounts received over the distribution of pre-child-support income, we find a U-shaped pattern, with amounts declining slightly with income over the first three deciles, and then increasing steadily. Lower-income families are also less likely to receive regular child support. Nonetheless, child support plays an important role in the income packages of many low-income families, reducing pre-child-support poverty rates by 16 percent and closing the poverty gap by an average of 44 percent in 2001.

http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp129805.pdf
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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research [Rostock, Germany]: "Concentration of reproduction in Austria: general trends and differentials by educational attainment and urban-rural setting," by Martin Spielauer (WP-2005-012, April 2005, .pdf format, 23p.).

Abstract:

In this paper, we explore the inter-individual diversity in fertility among women in Austria for the female birth cohorts 1917-1961. Comparative studies revealed that all Western countries have witnessed a decline in the concentration of reproduction during the 20th century, a trend that has reversed for the most recent cohorts that have reached the end of their reproductive period. This reversal, mainly triggered by an increase in childlessness, has been far less pronounced in Austria and limited to urban municipalities. Changes in fertility and concentration have followed very different trajectories by educational attainment as well as by the type of municipality in which women lived at age 15. Within educational categories, we found large differentials by profession and intergenerational educational mobility. A consequence of the concentration of reproduction is that the level of cohort fertility differs from the average sibship size seen from the children's perspective. In the Austrian case, in contrast to the pronounced fertility differentials by educational attainment, the average sibship size experienced by children became almost independent of parents' education. In difference to the negative correlation between fertility and concentration found in earlier studies for the first demographic transition and the baby boom, the fertility level and concentration moved in the same direction, and did so for an extended time period following the baby boom, accelerating changes from the children's perspective.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/Papers/Working/wp-2005-012.pdf
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National Bureau of Economic Research:

A. "The Impact of Family Income on Child Achievement," by Gordon B.Dahl and Lance Lochner (NBER Working Paper No. w11279, April 2005, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

Understanding the consequences of growing up poor for a child's well-being is an important research question, but one that is difficult to answer due to the potential endogeneity of family income. Past estimates of the effect of family income on child development have often been plagued by omitted variable bias and measurement error. In this paper, we use a fixed effect instrumental variables strategy to estimate the causal effect of income on children's math and reading achievement. Our primary source of identification comes from the large, non-linear changes in the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) over the last two decades. The largest of these changes increased family income by as much as 20%, or approximately $2,100. Using a panel of over 6,000 children matched to their mothers from National Longitudinal Survey of Youth datasets allows us to address problems associated with unobserved heterogeneity and endogenous transitory income shocks as well as measurement error in income. Our baseline estimates imply that a $1,000 increase in income raises math test scores by 2.1% and reading test scores by 3.6% of a standard deviation. The results are even stronger when looking at children from disadvantaged families who are affected most by the large changes in the EITC, and are robust to a variety of alternative specifications.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11279

B. "Work and Leisure in the U.S. and Europe: Why So Different?" by Alberto Alesina, Edward L. Glaeser, and Bruce Sacerdote (NBER Working Paper No. w11278, April 2005, .pdf format, 73p.).

Abstract:

Americans average 25.1 working hours per person in working age per week, but the Germans average 18.6 hours. The average American works 46.2 weeks per year, while the French average 40 weeks per year. Why do western Europeans work so much less than Americans? Recent work argues that these differences result from higher European tax rates, but the vast empirical labor supply literature suggests that tax rates can explain only a small amount of the differences in hours between the U.S. and Europe. Another popular view is that these differences are explained by long-standing European "culture," but Europeans worked more than Americans as late as the 1960s. In this paper, we argue that European labor market regulations, advocated by unions in declining European industries who argued "work less, work all" explain the bulk of the difference between the U.S. and Europe. These policies do not seem to have increased employment, but they may have had a more society-wide influence on leisure patterns because of a social multiplier where the returns to leisure increase as more people are taking longer vacations.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11278
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University of Washington Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology:

A. "Statistical Modeling of Social Networks: Practical Advances and Results," by Steven M. Goodreau, Martina Morris, and Mark Handcock (Working Paper No. 05-01, April 2005, .pdf format, 25p.).

http://csde.washington.edu/downloads/05-01.pdf

B. "Coital Frequency in Contemporary China and its Implications for Historical Fertility," by William Lavely (Working Paper No. 05-02, April 2005, .pdf format, 60p.).

http://csde.washington.edu/downloads/05-02.pdf

C. "National, Provincial, Prefectural and County Life Tables for China Based on the 2000 Census," by Yong Cai (Working Paper No. 05-03, April 2005, .pdf format, 18p.).

http://csde.washington.edu/downloads/05-03.pdf

D. "Model-Based Clustering for Social Networks," by Mark S. Handcock, Adrian E. Raftery, and Jeremy M. Tantrum (Working Paper No. 05-04, April 2005, .pdf format, 28p.).

http://csde.washington.edu/downloads/05-04.pdf

E. "Goodness of Fit of Social Network Models," by David R. Hunter, Steven M. Goodreau, and Mark S. Handcock (Working Paper No. 05-05, April 2005, .pdf format, 23p.).

http://csde.washington.edu/downloads/05-05.pdf
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Princeton [New Jersey] University Center for Health and Well-Being: "Center for Health and Well-Being [Princeton University]: "Health and Wealth Among the Poor: India and South Africa Compared," by Anne Case and Angus Deaton (April 2005, .pdf format, 18p.).

http://www.wws.princeton.edu/~rpds/downloads/case_deaton_healthwealth.pdf
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Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education of Charles University (CERGE) [Prague, Czech Republic]: "All in the Family: A Dynasty Approach to Household Migration Evidence from the 19th Century Austro-Hungarian Empire," by Alexander Klein (No. 250, March 2005, .pdf format, 42p.).

Abstract:

This paper deals with the rural-urban migration of families in the last decades of the 19th century in one of the most developed regions of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy -- the Pilsen region. The analysis indicates that the household head's expected real rural-urban wage gap was not the main factor behind migration. Instead, the observed behavior is consistent with families maximizing a dynastic utility function such that it was the future prospects of children which triggered migration. The results are not based on tracing of families in time but rely on identifying a control group of stayers. Specifically, I compare the structure of migrant families at the time of arrival to an urban area with that of families who stayed in the hinterlands and to decipher migration motifs.

http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp250.pdf
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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "Differences in Desired and Actual Fertility: An Economic Analysis of the Spanish Case," by Alicia Adsera (Discussion Paper no. 1584, May 2005, .pdf format, 40p.).

Abstract:

Family size is the outcome of sequential decisions influenced both by preferences and by ongoing changes in the environment where a family lives. During the last two decades the gap between the number of children women prefer and their actual fertility has widened in Spain. The paper uses the 1985 and 1999 Spanish Fertility Surveys to study whether the tightening of the labor market and worsening of economic conditions in Spain during the last twenty years are important determinants of this change. I find that women facing high unemployment rates in their mid-twenties tend to restrict their fertility below their ideal level. Among working-women, the stability of a public sector job lessens the difficulties of balancing work and family and of achieving preferred fertility. Temporary contracts work in the opposite direction. Findings are robust to the inclusion of controls for the use of family planning as well as within-couple discrepancies in either preferences or religious affiliation.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1584.pdf

B. "Education and Inequality in Greece," by Panos Tsakloglou, Ioannis Cholezas (Discussion Paper no. 1582, May 2005, .pdf format, 36p.).

Abstract:

In the public discourse, education is usually considered as the main vehicle for the promotion of social equality and social mobility. The paper surveys the existing literature and concludes that the relationship between education and inequality in Greece is strong. Inequities are evident at all levels of the education system; especially as regards access to the most rewarding level, that is, university education. Many facets of the inequities observed in the labour market are associated with education, while education appears to be the single most important factor that shapes the overall distribution of income and influences the probability of poverty. Nevertheless, so far, several links between education and inequality have not been examined in detail.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1582.pdf

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "advanced search"
C. Type in your publication name and click "Exact title" radio button
D. Under "Show", click the "fax/ariel" radio button.
E. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

Ethnicity and Disease (Vol. 15, No. 1, 2005).

Public Health Nursing (vol. 22, No. 2, March 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.
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Other Journals:

American Journal of Public Health (Vol. 95, No. 5, May 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Elite database. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.ajph.org/content/vol95/issue5/?etoc

Journal of Political Economy (vol. 113, No. 1, 2, February, April 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and these issues.

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JPE/journal/available.html

Public Health Reports (vol. 120, no. 3, May/June 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.publichealthreports.org/main.cfm

Public Opinion Quarterly (vol. 69, no. 1 (2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.poq.oupjournals.org/#

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CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS:

Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei [Rome, Italy]: "Population Conferences: Rome 1954--Rome 2005: Trends and Problems of the World Population in the 21st Century," a conference to be held in May 26-28, 2005 in Rome, Italy. For more information see:

http://w3.uniroma1.it/goliniweb/

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FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

Bureau of Justice Statistics: "Tribal Criminal History Record Improvement Pilot Program, 2005 Solicitation," (April 26, 2005). "The purpose of this solicitation is to announce the 2005 Criminal History Record Improvement Pilot Program in Indian Country. The Tribal Criminal History Record Improvement Pilot Program (T-CHRIP) will provide support to Federally-recognized tribes and State criminal records repositories to promote participation in and improve data sharing between tribal and State and national criminal records systems. Applications may be submitted at any time after publication of this announcement. Applications and accompanying documents must be received by May 26, 2005 to be eligible for funding in FY 2005." Use links the HTML or Acrobat for more information.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/tchripsol.htm

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DATA:

Census Bureau:

A. The Census Bureau has updated it's International Data Base. For more information about the data contained in this release, go to:

http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/idbr0504.html

To access the data online, go to:

http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/idbacc.html

B. Data from the 2004 Annual Survey of State Government Tax Collections is now available at:

http://www.census.gov/govs/www/statetax.html

Press release:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/economic_surveys/004738.html
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Bureau of Justice Statistics: "State Court Sentencing of Convicted Felons -- Statistical tables," (BJS, May 2005, .pdf and .zip compressed spreadsheet format).

Abstract:

"Presents detailed data from the nationally representative sample survey of felons convicted in State courts in 344 counties. Tables present the number of felony offenders in State courts, sentences received, demographic characteristics of convicted felons, the number of felons sentenced to probation, the number of felons convicted by trial and guilty plea, and the time required to process felony conviction cases. These data are released every two years."

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/scscfst.htm

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu