Current Demographic Research Report #80, April 25, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Press Releases, Facts for Features
Centers for Disease Control Periodical, Article
National Center for Health Statistics Report
World Health Organization Marburg Updates
SAMHSA Report
Congressional Budget Office Brief
Bureau of Justice Statistics Reports
_Demographic Research_ Articles
Government Accountability Office Report
American Association of University Professors Report
United Nations Children's Fund Reports
UNESCAP Reports
World Bank Compendium
New Zealand Ministry of Health Occasional Paper
National Bureau of Statistics of China Compendium
Pan American Health Organization Booklet
_JAMA_ Article Abstracts
Urban Institute Report
Allen Guttmacher Institute Periodical
Info Health Pop. Reporter

WORKING PAPERS

University of Texas-Austin Population Research Center
California Center for Population Research
National Bureau of Economic Research
John F. Kennedy School of Government (Harvard University)
National Center for Education Statistics
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
University of Oslo Department of Economics

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta
Other Journals

CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS

National Center for Education Statistics
Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP)

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

National Institutes of Health

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Child Trends

LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES

House Government Reform Hearing Publication

DATA

Department of Housing and Urban Development

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REPORTS, ARTICLES, NEWS RELEASES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Press Releases, Facts for Features:

A. "Census Bureau Begins Preparing for 2010 Census Test On South Dakota Reservation," (April 18, 2005).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/census_2010/004708.html

B. "Father's Day: June 19" (Facts for Features CB05-FF.08, April 19, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

HTML:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/004711.html

.pdf:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/cb05ff-08.pdf

C. "Cinco de Mayo" (Facts for Features CB05-FFSE.03, April 20, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 2p.).

HTML:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/004707.html

.pdf:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/cb05ffse-03.pdf

Other Facts for Features:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/index.html

C. "Florida, California and Texas to Dominate Future Population Growth, Census Bureau Reports," (April 18, 2005, detailed tables in Excel format).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/004704.html

Detailed tables (State Interim Population Projections by Age and Sex: 2004-2030):

http://www.census.gov/population/www/projections/projectionsagesex.html
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Centers for Disease Control Periodical, Article:

A. _Emerging Infectious Diseases_ (Vol. 11, No. 5, May 2005, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/index.htm

Note: This is a temporary address. When the next _EID_ is released, this one, along with all others, will be available at:

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/pastcon.htm

B. "Homicide and Suicide Rates---National Violent Death Reporting System, Six States, 2003," (Centers for Disease Control, _Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_, Vol. 54, No. 15, Apr. 22, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, p. 352-356).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5415a1.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5415.pdf

C. "QuickStats: Percentage of Persons Aged <65 Years Without Health Insurance, by Age Group and Number of Uninsured Months --- United States, 2003" (Centers for Disease Control, _Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_, Vol. 54, No. 15, Apr. 22, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, p. 385).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5415a4.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5415.pdf
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National Center for Health Statistics Report:

"Summary health statistics for the U.S. population: National Health Interview Survey, 2003," by Jeannine S. Schiller, M.P.H.; Patricia F. Adams; and Zakia Coriaty Nelson, (National Center for Health Statistics, Vital and Health Statistics, Series 10, No. 224, April 2005, .pdf format, 113p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_10/sr10_224.pdf
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World Health Organization Marburg Updates: WHO provides weekly updates on the status of the Marburg Haemorrhagic Fever outbreak in Angola.

http://www.who.int/csr/don/archive/disease/marburg_virus_disease/en/index.html
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Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Report: "The NSDUH Report: Substance Use Among Older Adults: 2002 & 2003 Update," (April 22, 2004, .pdf and HTML format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k5/olderadults/olderadults.cfm
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Congressional Budget Office Brief: "Changes in Participation in Means-Tested Programs," (April 20, 2005, .pdf format, 6p.).

http://www.cbo.gov/showdoc.cfm?index=6302&sequence=0

Click on "PDF" tab at top right of page.
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Bureau of Justice Statistics Reports:

A. "Prison and Jail Inmates at Midyear 2004," by Paige M. Harrison and Allen J. Beck (NCJ 208801, April 2005, ASCII text and .pdf format, with .zip compressed spreadsheets, 14p.).

Abstract:

Presents data on prison and jail inmates, collected from National Prisoner Statistics counts and the Annual Survey of Jails in 2004. This annual report provides for each State and the Federal system, the number of inmates and the overall incarceration rate per 100,000 residents. It offers trends since 1995 and percentage changes in prison populations since midyear and year end 2003. The midyear report presents the number of prison inmates held in private facilities and the number of prisoners under 18 years of age held by State correctional authorities. It includes total numbers for prison and jail inmates by gender, race, and Hispanic origin as well as counts of jail inmates by conviction status and confinement status. The report also provides findings on rated capacity of local jails, percent of capacity occupied, and capacity added. Standard errors for jail estimates are only provided in the appendix tables of the electronic version of this report.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/pjim04.htm

B. "Jails in Indian Country, 2003," by Todd D. Minton (NCJ 208597, April 2005, ASCII text and .pdf format, with .zip compressed spreadsheets, 12p.)

Abstract:

Presents findings from the 2003 Survey of Jails in Indian Country, an enumeration of all 70 confinement facilities, detention centers, jails, and other facilities operated by tribal authorities or the Bureau of Indian Affairs. BJS conducted the survey on June 30, 2003, as part of the Annual Survey of Jails. The report presents data for each facility. Included are the numbers of the following populations: adults and juveniles held, persons under community supervision, persons confined on the last week day of each month since July 2002, average daily population, peak population and admissions for June, and inmates who died. Numerical tables summarize rated capacity, facility crowding, and jail staffing. Inmate characteristics such as conviction status, DWI/DUI offense, and seriousness of offense are also presented.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/jic03.htm
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_Demographic Research_ Article: Note: _DR_ is a free, expedited, peer-reviewed journal of the population sciences published by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research" [Rostock, Germany]. "Labor force plans and labor force status: U.S. women of the college class of 1957", by Karen Leppel (Vol. 12, Article 8, April 2005, .pdf format, p. 173-196).

Abstract

Many U.S. women who were in their late 60s at the turn of the century were still employed. These women graduated from college in the 1950s, an era when women's labor force participation was low. Data from the U.S. Department of Labor Women's Bureau Survey of the college class of 1957 was used to examine labor force expectations of these women when they completed college. Logit analysis was applied to four labor force categories: full-time, part-time, unemployed, and not in the labor force. In 1957, many women underestimated their future labor force participation. By 1964, though, the trend toward increasing future work expectations may have begun. After examining the retirement literature and factors encouraging older women to continue working, Current Population Survey data on college-educated women aged 65 to 69 in 2003 were used to explore the labor force participation of this cohort later in life.

http://www.demographic-research.org/
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Government Accountability Office Report: "Means Tested Programs: Information on Program Access Can Be An Important Management Tool," (US Government Accountability Office, GAO-05-221, March 2005, .pdf format, 85p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05221.pdf

Note: This is a temporary address. GAO reports are always available at:

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gaoreports/index.html
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American Association of University Professors Report: "Inequities Persist for Women and Non-Tenure-Track Faculty: The Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession 2004-05," (April 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 11p.).

http://www.aaup.org/surveys/05z/zrep.htm
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United Nations Children's Fund Reports:

A. "Progress For Children: A Report Card on Gender Parity and Primary Education," (No. 2, April 2005, .pdf format, 30p.).

Summary:

Girls' education has been expanding all over the world, but not fast enough to ensure a basic education for millions of children still out of school or to ensure the progress of countries that lag behind. Progress for Children reports on where the world stands in its commitment to eliminate gender disparity in education by 2005: the first Millennium Development target agreed to by the international community and key to achieving the goal of universal primary education by 2015.

http://www.unicef.org/publications/index_25937.html

B. "Early Marriage: A Harmful Traditional Practice," (April 2005, .pdf format, 40p.).

Summary:

Child marriage is a violation of human rights, compromising the development of girls and often resulting in early pregnancy and social isolation. Young married girls face onerous domestic burdens, constrained decision-making and reduced life choices. Using data from the Demographic and Household Surveys, this publication estimates the prevalence of child marriage and seeks to identify and understand the factors associated with child marriage and cohabitation. The statistical linkages identified can help programmers promote delayed marriage and use advocacy and behaviour-change campaigns to prevent child marriage.

http://www.unicef.org/publications/index_26024.html
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United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Reports:

A. "Implementing the Monterrey Consensus in the Asian and Pacific Region: Achieving Coherence and Consistency," (April 2005, .pdf format 155p.).

Abstract

"This study takes stock of the progress made by Asian and Pacific countries in implementing the six areas of action set out in the Monterrey Consensus of the International Conference on Financing for Development. These include mobilizing domestic and international resources, international trade, financial and technical cooperation,external debt and systemic issues in the region's monetary, financial and trading systems. The study examines whether these systems are sufficient to maintain the region's competitiveness, lays out policy options for the region's Governments and proposes a number of actions to address gaps in both policy and financing".

http://www.unescap.org/pdd/publications/themestudy2005/ThemeStudy05_full.pdf

B. "Statistical Indicators for Asia and the Pacific: Vol. XXXV, No. 1, March 2005 (April 2005, .pdf format). "This quarterly publication provides statistics for the assessment of demographic and economic trends. Data includes population, industry, transport, internal and external trade, prices and financial statistics in selected countries or areas of the ESCAP region, accompanied by charts. Each country's data is presented in a single section or in regional comparative tables where possible, depending availability."

http://www.unescap.org/publications/detail.asp?id=1040

Click on "View Full Text" for full text.

C. "Statistical Indicators for Asia and the Pacific: Vol. XXXIV, No. 4, December 2004 (Compendium) (.pdf format, April 2005). "This quarterly publication provides statistics for the assessment of demographic and economic trends. Data includes population, industry, transport, internal and external trade, prices and financial statistics in selected countries or areas of the ESCAP region, accompanied by charts. Each country's data is presented in a single section or in regional comparative tables where possible, depending availability."

http://www.unescap.org/publications/detail.asp?id=1027
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World Bank Compendium: "The Little Green Data Book, 2005" (March 2005, .pdf format, 236p.). "The Little Green Data Book is a pocket-sized quick reference on key environmental data. Each page corresponds to one country. The user-friendly presentation of country data provides a baseline for comparison with regional and income group averages. Under the headings of agriculture, forests, biodiversity, energy, emissions and pollution, water and sanitation, and 'greener' national accounts, the Little Green data Book presents 47 indicators of the environment and its relationship to people for more than 200 countries."

http://lnweb18.worldbank.org/ESSD/envext.nsf/44ByDocName/EnvironmentalIndicatorsCurrentInitiativesTheLittleGreenDataBook2005
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New Zealand Ministry of Health Occasional Paper: "Decades of Disparity II: Socioeconomic mortality trends in New Zealand 1981-1999 (Public Health Intelligence Occasional Bulletin No. 25, March 2005, .pdf and Microsoft Word format, 175p.).

http://www.moh.govt.nz/moh.nsf/0/1999a3f85f9da156cc256fe9000ad7fc?OpenDocument
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National Bureau of Statistics of China Compendium: "China Statistical Yearbook--2004," (April 2005, HTML and Microsoft Excel format). "China Statistical Yearbook 2004 is an annual statistics publication, which covers very comprehensive data in 2003 and some selected data series in historically important years and the most recent twenty years at national level and local levels of province, autonomous region, and municipality directly under the central government and therefore, reflects various aspects of China's social and economic development."

http://www.stats.gov.cn/english/statisticaldata/yearlydata/yb2004-e/indexeh.htm

Note: Cancel any request to download a Chinese language character set. The web compendium is in English.
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Pan American Health Organization Booklet: "Ethical guidelines for research involving human subjects," (April 2005, Microsoft Word format, 8p.).

http://www.paho.org/English/DD/IKM/RC/ethics_guide.doc
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_Journal of the American Medical Association_ Article Abstracts:

A. "Excess Deaths Associated With Underweight, Overweight, and Obesity," by Katherine M. Flegal, Barry I. Graubard, David F. Williamson, and Mitchell H. Gail (_JAMA_, vol. 293, no. 15, April 20, 2005, p. 1861-1867).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/293/15/1861

B. "Secular Trends in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors According to Body Mass Index in US Adults," by Edward W. Gregg, Yiling J. Cheng, Betsy L. Cadwell, Giuseppina Imperatore, Desmond E. Williams, Katherine M. Flegal, K. M. Venkat Narayan, and David F. Williamson (_JAMA_, vol. 293, no. 15, April 20, 2005, p. 1868-1874).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/293/15/1868
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Urban Institute Report: "Use of Relative Care by Working Parents," by Kathleen Snyder, Timothy Dore, and Sarah Adelman (Snapshots of America's Families III, no. 23, April 2005, .pdf format, 2p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311161
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Allen Guttmacher Institute Periodical: _International Family Planning Perspectives_ (Vol. 31, No. 1, March 2005, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.guttmacher.org/journals/toc/ifpp3101toc.html

_IFPP_ Archive back to 1996:

http://www.guttmacher.org/journals/ifpp_archive.html
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Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (vol. 5, no. 17, Apr. 25, 2005). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe.

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

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WORKING PAPERS:

University of Texas-Austin Population Research Center: "Growth Curve Models for Zero-Inflated Count Data: An Empirical Application to Smoking Behavior," by Liu, Hui and Daniel A. Powers (Working Paper 4-05-08, 2005, .pdf format, 55p.).

Abstract:

This paper applies models for longitudinal count data characterized by an excess number of zeros. We discuss the zero-inflated Poisson regression model for longitudinal data in the context of growth curve modeling, in which the impact of covariates on initial counts and the rate of change over time in counts is the focus of inference. We describe basic growth curve models using a single outcome trajectory as well as a model in which two linked growth trajectories characterize a parallel growth process. We carry out an empirical application to assess the impact of changes in financial stress on smoking trajectories.

http://www.prc.utexas.edu/working_papers/wp_pdf/04-05-08.pdf
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California Center for Population Research: "Children's time use, labor division, and schooling in Indonesia", by Amy Hsin (CCPR Working Paper no. 005-05, April 2005 .pdf format, 42 p.).

Abstract:

Using both time diary and qualitative data collected from Indonesia, this paper examines the association between gender and sibship composition on children's time use across four activities--schooling, market labor, non-market oriented labor (i.e. housework/childcare activities), and leisure. The quantitative results show that failing to consider children's contributions to domestic labor underestimates children's labor responsibilities, especially for girls. Once domestic labor is considered, girls spend more time working and less time enjoying leisure. Girls' time is also more sensitive to sibship composition. Older female siblings reduce their sisters' labor responsibilities while younger brothers increase work for their sisters. However, increases in workload do not parallel decreases in schooling but parallel decreases in leisure. Qualitative data collected from focus groups show that parents are reluctant to trade-off children's schooling for labor and that parents desire equal amounts of education for their sons and daughters. Taken together, the results provide descriptive evidence that girls' leisure time is traded off for work rather than schooling for work.

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/ccprwpabstracts/ccpr_005_05.htm

Click on "Full Text" at the end of the abstract for full text.
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National Bureau of Economic Research: " Culture: An Empirical Investigation of Beliefs, Work, and Fertility by Raquel Fernandez and Alessandra Fogli (NBER Working Paper No. 11268, April 2005, .pdf format, 33p.).

Abstract:

We study the effect of culture on important economic outcomes by using the 1970 Census to examine the work and fertility behavior of women 30-40 years old, born in the U.S., but whose parents were born elsewhere. We use past female labor force participation and total fertility rates from the country of ancestry as our cultural proxies. These variables should capture, in addition to past economic and institutional conditions, the beliefs commonly held about the role of women in society, i.e. culture. Given the different time and place, only the beliefs embodied in the cultural proxies should be potentially relevant to women's behavior in the US in 1970. We show that these cultural proxies have positive and significant explanatory power for individual work and fertility outcomes, even after controlling for possible indirect effects of culture (e.g., education and spousal characteristics). We examine alternative hypotheses for these positive correlations and show that neither unobserved human capital nor networks are likely to be responsible. We also show that the effect of these cultural proxies is amplified the greater is the tendency for ethnic groups to cluster in the same neighborhoods.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11268
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John F. Kennedy School of Government (Harvard University):

A. "Race, Poverty and Public Policy," by Mary Jo Bane (RWP05-030, March 2005, .pdf format, 23p.).

Abstract:

Poverty rates in the United States vary dramatically by race and ethnicity, ranging from 24.3 percent for African-Americans to 8.2 percent for non-Hispanic Whites. This paper reports the contemporary data and explores the extent to which racial differences in poverty rates reflect differences in family structure and education. Finding residual differences, it the explores the importance of racial stigma, racial discrimination and racial segregation. It places these facts in the context of Catholic Social Teaching, and suggests directions for both government policy and the church.

http://ksgnotes1.harvard.edu/Research/wpaper.nsf/rwp/RWP05-030?OpenDocument

Click on PDF icon for full text.

B. "Poverty and Place in North America," by Mary Jo Bane and Rene Zenteno (RWP05-035, April 2005, .pdf format, 31p.).

Abstract:

This paper provides an overview of poverty in North America: in Mexico, the United States and Canada. It begins with an overview of growth and inequality in the three countries. The second section of the paper presents concepts and measures of poverty and reports the overall incidence of poverty in the three countries using various measures. The third section explores the relationship between the level of economic development and poverty, both between and within countries. The fourth section looks at the relationships between household composition and poverty and between race/ethnicity and poverty in the US and Mexico. The final section briefly raises policy issues that emerge from the analysis.

http://ksgnotes1.harvard.edu/Research/wpaper.nsf/rwp/RWP05-035?OpenDocument
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National Center for Education Statistics: "2004 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:04) Field Test Methodology Report," by J. Riccobono, P. Siegel, M. Cominole, K. Dudley, S. Charleston, and M. Link (NCES 200502, April 2005, .pdf format, 333p.). "This report describes the methodology and findings of the NPSAS:04 field test, which took place in the 2002-03 school year. The NPSAS:04 field test was used to plan, implement, and evaluate methodological procedures, instruments, and systems proposed for use in the full-scale study scheduled for the 2003-04 school year."

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=200502
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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "Child Poverty and Changes in Child Poverty in Rich Countries Since 1990," by Wen-Hao Chen and Miles Corak (Discussion Paper No. 1574, April 2005, .pdf format, 61p.).

Abstract:

This paper documents levels and changes in child poverty rates in 12 OECD countries using data from the Luxembourg Income Study project, and focusing upon an analysis of the reasons for changes over the 1990s. The objective is to uncover the relative role of income transfers from the state in determining the magnitude and direction of change in child poverty rates, holding other demographic and labour market factors constant. As such the paper offers a cross-country overview of child poverty, changes in child poverty, and the impact of public policy in North America and Europe.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1574.pdf

B. "'It Wasn't Me, It Was Them!' - Social Influence in Risky Behavior by Adolescents," by Andrew Clark and Youenn Loheac (Discussion Paper No. 1573, April 2005, .pdf format, 23p.).

Abstract:

Many years of concerted policy effort in Western countries has not prevented young people from experimenting with cigarettes, alcohol and marijuana. One potential explanation is that social interactions make consumption "sticky". We use detailed panel data from the Add Health survey to examine risky behavior (the consumption of tobacco, alcohol and marijuana) by American adolescents. We find that, even controlling for school fixed effects, these behaviors are correlated with lagged peer group behavior. Peer group effects are strongest for alcohol use, and young males are more influential than young females. Last, we present some evidence of non-linearities in social interactions.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1573.pdf

C. "Where Are the Babies? Labor Market Conditions and Fertility in Europe," by Alicia Adsera (Discussion Paper No. 1576, April 2005, .pdf format, 46p.).

Abstract:

Cross-country differences in both the age at first birth and fertility are substantial in Europe. The paper uses the European Community Household Panel 1994-2000 to investigate the relationship between unemployment of both women (and their spouses) with the timing and number of children. Maternity postponement is acute in countries with high and persistent unemployment since the mid 1980s. Moreover, the paper examines how fertility varies, for a similar level of unemployment, as a function of country-specific institutional arrangements. Wide access to part-time and to permanent positions (such as those in the public sector) is correlated with faster transitions to births. Short-term contracts are associated with delayed fertility instead.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1576.pdf

D. "Principles and Practicalities for Measuring Child Poverty in the Rich Countries by Miles Corak (Discussion Paper No. 1579, April 2005, .pdf format, 66p.).

Abstract:

This paper has three objectives. The first is to discuss the major issues involved in defining and measuring child poverty. The choices that must be made are clarified, and a set of six principles to serve as a guide for public policy are stated. The second objective is to take stock of child poverty and changes in child poverty in the majority of OECD countries since about 1990 when the Convention on the Rights of the Child came into force. Finally, the third objective is to formulate a number of suggestions for the setting of credible targets for the elimination of child poverty in the rich countries. This involves a method for embodying the ideal of children having priority on social resources into a particular set of child poverty reduction targets, it involves the development of appropriate and timely information sources, and finally it involves the clarification of feasible targets that may vary across the OECD.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1579.pdf
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University of Oslo [Norway] Department of Economics: "Income inequality and the economic position of women in Norway 1970-2002," by Hilde Bojer (07/2005, April 2005, .pdf format, 20p.).

In the period from 1970 to 2002, Norwegian women moved out of the home and into the paid labour market. The paper investigates the effect of this social change on women's economic position and on individual income in- equality. It argues that the distribution of individual incomes is of equal interest to household incomes as targets of public policy. Inequality is measured by the generalised entropy measure. The data are taken from the triennial, later annual, surveys of income carried out by Statistics Norway in the period, giving reliable data on income for samples varying from 6000 to 30 000 women and men. Women's average income relative to that of men increased from 27 percent to 60 per cent. Total individual income inequality decreased strongly from 1970 to 1990, and decreased very slightly from 1990 to 2002. But this total covers very different developments for women and men. Women's internal inequality decreased up to about 1990; the later trend is unclear. Men's internal inequality increased during the 1990s. However, the increase in men's inequality is shown to be mostly due to fluctuations in capital income. Inequality of employees remained unchanged during the whole period, both for women and men, when capital income is disregarded.

http://www.oekonomi.uio.no/memo/memopdf/memo0705.pdf

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "advanced search"
C. Type in your publication name and click "Exact title" radio button
D. Under "Show", click the "fax/ariel" radio button.
E. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

International Labour Review (Vol. 143, No. 4, December 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

Milbank Quarterly (Vol. 83, No. 1, 2004).
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Other Journals:

AIDS (vol. 19, supp. 1, April 2005).

http://www.aidsonline.com/pt/re/aids/issuelist.htm

American Journal of Epidemiology (vol. 161, no. 9, May 1, 2005).

http://aje.oupjournals.org/content/vol161/issue9/index.dtl?etoc

Medical Care (vol. 43, no. 5, May 2005).

http://www.lww-medicalcare.com/pt/re/medcare/issuelist.htm

Follow link to "May 2005".

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CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS:

National Center for Education Statistics: "NCES Forum & Summer Data Conference, 2005 (STATS-DC 2005)." The Summer Forum will be held July 25-26, 2005, and the Data Conference will be held July 27-29, 2005 (both will be in Washington, DC). The deadline for registration is July 1, 2005.

http://nces.ed.gov/conferences/confinfo.asp?confid=18
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Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR): "ICPSR Summer Program: June-August 2005". "Since its inception, the Consortium has offered the ICPSR Summer Training Program as a complement to its data services. The Summer Program provides a comprehensive, integrated program of studies in research design, statistics, data analysis, and social science methodology. Its instructional environment stresses integration of methods of quantitative analysis within a broader context of substantive social research. Instruction is grounded in interactive, participatory data-analysis utilizing high-end, networked microcomputers. Because of the range of methodological instruction, the opportunity for intensive study, and the quality of instruction and supporting facilities, the Summer Program has become internationally recognized as a preeminent forum for basic and advanced training in the methodologies and technologies of social science research and instruction."

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/training/summer/index.html
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German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP): "2005 GSOEP-CNEF [Cross-National Equivalent Files] Conference," a conference to be held September 9-10, 2005 at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. For more information see:

http://www.human.cornell.edu/pam/gsoep/2005conf/index.cfm

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FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

National Institutes of Health:

A. "Methodology and Measurement in the Behavioral and Social Sciences," (National Institute on Aging in conjunction with other agencies, PA-05-090, April 15, 2005). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-05-090.html

B. "Secondary Data Analyses Based on the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development" (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)), PA-05-093, Apr. 22, 2005). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-05-093.html

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

Child Trends: "Child Trends has an opening for a Research Associate in its Fertility and Family Structure research area. Current research projects focus on adolescent relationships, sexual activity, and contraceptive use; unintended pregnancy and childbearing; male fertility behaviors; and nonmarital childbearing and union formation. These projects use data from the National Survey of Family Growth, the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort, and the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (Kindergarten cohort and Birth cohort). Experience with one or more of these data files is preferred."

http://www.cpc.unc.edu/projects/addhealth/files/childtrends.pdf

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LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES:

House Government Reform Hearing Publication: "Is Uncle Sam Still Passing the Buck? The Burden of Unfunded Mandates on State, County, and City Governments," a hearing held Mar. 8, 2005 (ASCII text and .pdf format, 156p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/house07ch109.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "109-6" (without the quotes).

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DATA:

Department of Housing and Urban Development: "2003 GSE (Government-Sponsored Enterprises) Mortgage Data" (self decompressing ASCII format, with documentation in ASCII and .pdf format). "Newly released 2003 data sets on single-family and multifamily mortgage purchases by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (Government-Sponsored Enterprises, or 'GSEs') are now available from HUD USER. The 2003 data sets now add an eleventh year in HUD's GSE public-use mortgage data series, previously released for 1993 through 2002. 2003 is the third year in which the GSE housing goals specified by HUD in October 2000 were in effect. GSE mortgage data supply mortgage lenders, planners, researchers, and housing advocates with a wealth of data concerning the flow of mortgage credit and capital in America's communities. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are required to meet specified goals for purchases of mortgages that finance housing for very low-, low- and moderate-income families and families living in areas traditionally underserved by the mortgage market."

http://www.huduser.org/datasets/gse/gse2003.html

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu