Current Demographic Research Report #79, April 18, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

========================================================================

Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

CDC _MMWR_ Article, Quickstats
Government Accountability Office Report
National Center for Health Statistics Reports
National Center for Education Statistics Report
US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Report
IMF-World Bank Report
American Social Health Association
Urban Institute Report
Population Reference Bureau Articles
_Milbank Quarterly_ Article
East-West Center Report
_Demographic Research_ Articles
Pan American Health Organization Periodical
_Lancet_ Article Abstract
Info Health Pop. Reporter
NLS Bibliography Updates

WORKING PAPERS

University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty
Rand Corporation Labor and Population Program
Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
National Bureau of Economic Research
Center for Health and Wellbeing [Princeton University]
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Other Journals

CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS

Wildlife Conservation Society/Rockefeller University Conference Presentations

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

National Institutes of Health

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

United Nations

DATA

Census Bureau
National Cancer Institute
American Religion Data Archive
Panel Survey of Income Dynamics Update
UK Data Archive

WEBSITES OF INTEREST

Kaiser Family Foundation

=========================================================================

REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

CDC _MMWR_ Article, Quickstats:

A. "Preliminary FoodNet Data on the Incidence of Infection with Pathogens Transmitted Commonly Through Food --- 10 Sites, United States, 2004, Centers for Disease Control, _Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_, Vol. 54, No. 14, Apr. 15, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, p. 352-356).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5414a2.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5414.pdf

B. "QuickStats: Life Expectancy at Birth, by Year --- United States, 1970--2003" (Centers for Disease Control, _Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_, Vol. 54, No. 14, Apr. 15, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, p. 363).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5414a6.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5414.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Government Accountability Office Report: "HHS: Efforts to Research and Inform the Public About Nonoxynol-9's Safety and Effectiveness in Preventing HIV," (GAO-05-399, March 31, 2005, .pdf format, 28p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05399.pdf

Note: This is a temporary addresses. GAO reports are always available at:

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gaoreports/index.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Center for Health Statistics Reports:

A. "Vital Statistics of the United States, 2000: Volume I, Natality," (April 2005, .pdf format). Note: "This Internet release of Vital Statistics of the United States, 2000, Volume I, Natality, includes a total of 32 tables. Production of a CD-ROM containing these tables is currently in process."

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/datawh/statab/unpubd/natality/natab2000.htm

B. "Trends in Health Insurance and Access to Medical Care for Children Under Age 19 Years: United States, 1998-2003," by Robin A. Cohen and Barbara Bloom (Advance Data No. 355, April 2005, .pdf format, 12p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/ad/ad355.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Center for Education Statistics Report: "E.D. TAB: Revenues and Expenditures by Public School Districts: School Year 2001-02," by Frank Johnson (NCES 2005342, April 2005, .pdf format 13p.).

This brief publication contains data on revenues and expenditures per pupil made by school districts for school year 2001-02. Median per pupil revenue and expenditure data are reported by state, as well as values at the 5th and 95th percentiles. Data for charter schools are reported separately. There are also discussions on the different types of school districts, and other resources that may be helpful in analyzing school district level data. For total revenues and expenditures for public education made by states and the nation, readers should refer to the state-level "E.D. TAB: Revenues and Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary Education: School Year 2001-02"

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005342
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Report: "Rural Children At A Glance," by Carolyn Rogers (Economic Information Bulletin EIB 1, April 2005, .pdf format, 6p.).

Abstract:

This report provides the latest information on the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of rural children in families. Child poverty in 21st century America is higher (18 percent in 2003) than the rate for the general population (12.5 percent), as well as above the rates in most other industrialized countries. Child poverty is a significant social problem that negatively affects children's development. Although rural child poverty rates declined in the 1990s, they remain higher than the rates for urban children (21 percent vs. 18 percent). In 2003, 2.7 million rural children were poor, representing 36 percent of the rural poor. Nonmetro children are more likely than metro children to receive food stamps and free or reduced-price school lunches, in part a reflection of higher nonmetro poverty. The geographic distribution of child poverty--heavily concentrated in the South--is important for targeting poverty reduction policies and program assistance such as child nutrition programs, food stamps, and health insurance coverage in rural areas.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/EIB1/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

International Monetary Fund/World Bank Report: "New IMF-World Bank Report Calls for Urgent Action to Cut Global Poverty and Win Better Development Results for Poor Countries". A link to the second annual Global Monitoring Report (April 2005, .pdf format, 256p.) is available in the press release.

http://www.imf.org/external/np/sec/pr/2005/pr0583.htm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

American Social Health Association Report: "State of the Nation 2005: Challenges Facing STD Prevention in Youth," (2005, .pdf format, 18p.).

http://www.ashastd.org/pdfs/ASHA_05.final.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Urban Institute Report: "Distressed Public Housing--What It Costs to Do Nothing," by Margery Austin Turner, Susan J. Popkin, and G. Thomas Kingsley (April 2005, .pdf format, 18p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411159
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Population Reference Bureau Periodical, Articles:

A. _Population Bulletin_ (Vol. 60, No. 1, March 2005, .pdf format). This issue is titled: "Global Aging: The Challenge of Success by Kevin Kinsella and David R. Phillips.

http://www.prb.org/pdf05/60.1GlobalAging.pdf

B. "Good Health Still Eludes the Poorest Women and Children," by Lori S. Ashford (April 2005).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/05_Articles/Good_Health_Still_Eludes_the_Poorest_Women_and_Children.htm

C. "Tracking and Reducing Maternal Deaths Presents Major Challenges," by Yvette Collymore (April 2005).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/05_Articles/Tracking_and_Reducing_Maternal_Deaths_Presents_Major_Challenges.htm

D. "Conspiracy Beliefs May Be Hindering HIV Prevention Among African Americans," by Charles Dervarics (March 2005).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/05_Articles/Conspiracy_Beliefs_May_Be_Hindering_HIV_Prevention_Among_African_Americans.htm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

_Milbank Quarterly_ Article: "Mortality of White Americans, African Americans, and Canadians: The Causes and Consequences for Health of Welfare State Institutions and Policies," by Stephen J. Kunitz and Irena Pesis-Katz (Vol. 83, No. 1, 2005).

http://www.milbank.org/quarterly/8301feat.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

East-West Center Report: "Can China Afford to Continue Its One-Child Policy?" by Wang Feng. (AsiaPacific Issues, No. 77. March 2005, .pdf format, 12p.).

http://www.eastwestcenter.org/stored/pdfs/api077.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

_Demographic Research_ Article: Note: _DR_ is a free, expedited, peer-reviewed journal of the population sciences published by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research" [Rostock, Germany]. "A comparison of different methods for decomposition of changes in expectation of life at birth and differentials in life expectancy at birth", by P. K. Murthy Vol. 12, Article 7, April 2005, .pdf format, p. 141-172).

Abstract:

Several methods were proposed to decompose the difference between two life expectancies at birth into the contribution by different age groups. In this study an attempt has been made to compare different methods with that of Chandra Sekar (1949) method. The methodologies suggested by Arriaga, Lopez and Ruzicka and Pollard have been extended. It is shown that all the three methods and also Chandra Sekar method in their modified (symmetrical) form will be seen to produce the same result as that of United Nations, Pollard, Andreev and Pressat. Finally it is suggested to use symmetric formulae of the above methods because the percent contribution of total of the interaction terms to the difference in the life expectancy at birth is observed to be very negligible.

http://www.demographic-research.org/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Pan American Health Organization Periodical: _PAHO Today_ (April 2005, HTML format). "PAHO Today is the newsletter of the Pan American Health Organization, published three times a year. In this edition: Mothers and Children: Make Them Count, Time to Prepare for Flu, Dealing with Disasters, Gang Violence Requires a Preventive Approach, more.

http://www.paho.org/English/DD/PIN/pahotoday_apr05.htm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

_Lancet_ Article Abstract: Note: _Lancet_ requires free registration before providing content. "Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and overweight among adults in China," by Dongfeng Gu, Kristi Reynolds, Xigui Wu, Jing Chen, Xiufang Duan, Robert F. Reynolds, Paul K. Whelton, and Jiang He, for the InterASIA Collaborative Group (_Lancet_, vol. 365, no. 9468, April 16, 2005, p. 1398-1405).

http://www.thelancet.com/journal/vol365/iss9468/abs/llan.365.9468.primary_research.32984.1
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (vol. 2, no. 7, Apr. 18, 2005). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

NLS Bibliography Updates: Note: These citations, along with all of the NLS bibliography, can be found at:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/

Note: Where available, direct links to full text have been provided. These references represent updated citations from Mar. 21 - Apr. 15, 2005.

For more information on any of these citations (selected abstracts are available) go to the above listed address and click on "Title List". Click on the first item, which will give the syntax of the citation urls:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/qtitle.php3?myrow[0]=320

Then change the number after the equal sign (320 in this case) to the number listed as the "ID Number" in the citations below. You will be taken to the full citation listing.

ZIMMERMAN, FREDERICK J.
GLEW, G.M.
CHRISTAKIS, DIMITRI A.
KATON, W.
Early Cognitive Stimulation, Emotional Support, and Television Watching as Predictors of Subsequent Bullying Among Grade-School Children
Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 159,4 (April 2005): 384-388
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4922
Publisher: American Medical Association

LI, CHAOYANG
KAUR, HARSOHENA
CHOI WON S.
HUANG TERRY T.-K.
LEE REBECCA E,
AHLUWALIA JASJIT S.
Additive Interactions of Maternal Prepregnancy BMI and Breast-feeding on Childhood Overweight
Obesity Research 13,2 (February 2005): 362-371
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
ID Number: 4923
Publisher: North American Association for the Study of Obesity (NAASO)

DELEIRE, THOMAS
KALIL, ARIEL
Who Becomes a Multigenerational Grandmother? Selection into Multigenerational Households
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
ID Number: 4925
Publisher: Population Association of America

SCHWARTZ, CHRISTINE R.
Educational Homogamy in Marital and Cohabiting Unions: A Test of the Double Selection Hypothesis
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4926
Publisher: Population Association of America

LIGHT, AUDREY L.
OMORI, YOSHIAKI
Economic Incentives and Family Formation
Presented: Philadelphia PA, Population Association of America Meetings,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4927
Publisher: Population Association of America

FOMBY, PAULA
CHERLIN, ANDREW J.
Family Instability and Selection Effects on Children
Presented: Philadelphia PA, Population Association of America Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
ID Number: 4928
Publisher: Population Association of America

SCHMIDT, AMY
Divorce and Marriage: Does the Marriage Wage Premium Matter?
Presented: Philidelphia PA, Population Association of America Meetings,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4929
Publisher: Population Association of America

HAN, WEN-JUI
WALDFOGEL, JANE
Parents' Nonstandard Work Schedules and Adolescents' Socio-Emotional Outcomes
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
ID Number: 4930
Publisher: Population Association of America

HEYWOOD, JOHN S.
O'HALLORAN, PATRICK L.
Racial Earnings Differentials and Performance Pay
Journal of Human Resources 40,2 (Spring 2005): 435-452.
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4931
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press

FRAZIS, HARLEY
LOEWENSTEIN, MARK A.
Reexamining the Returns to Training: Functional Form, Magnitude, and Interpretation
Journal of Human Resources 40,2 (Spring 2005): 453-476
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4932
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press

DUNIFON, RACHEL
KOWALESKI-JONES, LORI
The Role of Grandparents in Single-Mother Families
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
ID Number: 4933
Publisher: Population Association of America

ARKES, JEREMY
KLERMAN, JACOB A.
Understanding the Fertility-Economy Link for Teenagers
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY97
ID Number: 4934
Publisher: Population Association of America

JEKIELEK, SUSAN
Like Mother, Like Daughter? The Intergenerational Consequences of Teen Childbearing
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
ID Number: 4935
Publisher: Population Association of America

POWERS, DANIEL A.
ELLISON, CHRISTOPHER G.
Conservative Protestantism and Church Attendance Effects on Teen Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4936
Publisher: Population Association of America

ROMICH, JENNIFER L.
Training, Trading or Taking? Parents' Work, Children's Work and
Intergenerational Transfers
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting,
March-April 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY97
ID Number: 4937
Publisher: Population Association of America

SOLBERG, ERIC J.
The Gender Pay Gap by Occupation: A Test of the Crowding Hypothesis
Contemporary Economic Policy 23,1 (January 2005): 129-148. Also:
http://cep.oupjournals.org/cgi/reprint/23/1/129
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4939
Publisher: Western Economic Association International

KOOP, G.
TOBIAS, JUSTIN L.
Learning about Heterogeneity in Returns to Schooling
Journal of Applied Econometrics 19,7 (November-December 2004): 827-849. Also:
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/107636928/HTMLSTART
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4940
Publisher: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

Return to top

=========================================================================

WORKING PAPERS:

University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty: "An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis of the Rise in the Prevalence of the U.S. Population Overweight and/or Obese," Andrew Cook and Beth Osborne Daponte (DP 1296-05, April 2005, .pdf format, 40p. ).

Abstract:

Using data from the National Health Interview Survey for years spanning 1976 to 2001, this paper presents an age-period-cohort analysis of weight gain throughout the life cycle. We find that while all ages experienced an increase in the proportion overweight and/or obese (PO&O), the PO&O of young adults has grown at a faster rate than that of older age groups. We find that the increases in Body Mass Index are primarily due to period effects, not cohort or age effects. From the ordered logistical regression analyses, we find that protective influence of factors such as education, income, and age on an individual's Body Mass Index have decreased over time. The analyses suggest that the increase in PO&O is a phenomenon that all demographic groups in the United States have experienced.

http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp129605.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Rand Corporation Labor and Population Program: "Multi-Site Implementation: Medicaid Section 1931(b) in California," by Jacob Alex Klerman and Amy G. Cox (WR-249, March 2005, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses the implementation of the new Medicaid 1931(b) program in California and its 58 counties to consider multi-site implementation. Given California's county-operated welfare system, the California Department of Health Services (CDHS) made policy that each of the state's 58 counties was to implement. Combining unusually rich administrative data, official documents, and qualitative field work, the authors find that actual implementation occurred as much as several years later than was required by state-level policy, with considerable heterogeneity across the counties, and that the heterogeneity was to a great extent due to the details of computer systems. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of these results for implementation and the study of implementation.

http://www.rand.org/publications/WR/WR249/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research

A. "Official population statistics and the Human Mortality Database estimates of populations aged 80+ in Germany and nine other European countries," by Dmitri Jdanov, Rembrandt Scholz, and Vladimir M. Shkolnikov (MPIDR Working Paper 2005-010, April 2005, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract

A systematic comparison of the Human Mortality Database and official estimates of populations aged 80+ is presented. We consider statistical series for East and West Germany and also series for Denmark, England and Wales, France, Finland, Hungary, the Netherlands, Russia, Sweden, and Switzerland. The Human Mortality Database (HMD, www.mortality.org) methodology re-lies on the methods of extinct and almost extinct generations. HMD estimates are precise if the quality of death data is high and the migration among the elderly is negligible. The comparisons between the HMD and the official populations are not fully appropriate for the 1990s since the HMD calculations are related to official population estimates. A significant overestimation of the male population aged 80+ and especially 90+ between the censuses of 1970 and 1987 was found in West Germany. The relative surplus of men aged 90+ increased from 5 to 20 percent, which expressed in absolute numbers indicates an increase from 2 to 10 thousand. In 1971-1987 the official death rates have fallen dramatically to implausibly low values. In 1987-88 death rates based on the official populations suddenly jumped to the HMD death rates due to the census re-estimation. In the 1990s an accelerated decrease in male death rates has resumed. For other countries, the relative and absolute deviations from the HMD estimates were especially high in Russia, Hungary, and England and Wales. Regression analysis reveals common factors of the relative deviation from the HMD populations. The deviation tends to decrease with time, increase with age, be higher during inter-census periods than in census years, and to decrease after the introduction of population registers. (Key words: aging; elderly; population estimates; quality of statistics)

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/Papers/Working/wp-2005-010.pdf

B. "Subjective well-being and mortality in Chinese oldest old," by Qiang Li (MPIDR Working Paper 2005-011, April 2005, .pdf format, 33p).

Abstract

The present study investigates the relationship between subjective well-being (SWB) and mortality risk, using a large sample (N=7852) from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Study (age range 80-105) conducted in 2000 and 2002. Initially, we intended to contribute to the understanding of system relations between SWB, mortality risk, and unobserved heterogeneity by treating SWB as an endogenous variable, using a multi-process model. However, failure to identify unobserved heterogeneity in the mortality equation prevents us from employing this model. Given this limitation, the study examines three issues. First, we argue that the mortality model with duration dependency on the age of the study subjects is specified and that the model with duration dependency on time since the interview is misspecified. Second, we address problems associated with the identification of unobserved heterogeneity in the mortality equation. Third, we examine the association between SWB and mortality risk in the Chinese oldest old as well as the risk pattern by gender, without considering unobserved heterogeneity. We find that SWB is not a significant predictor of mortality risk when we control for socio-demographic characteristics and health status. Health plays a very important role in the relationship between SWB and mortality risk in the oldest old. Gender differences in the predictive pattern of SWB on this risk are negligible in the sample.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/Papers/Working/wp-2005-011.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Bureau of Economic Research:

A. "On the Measurement of Segregation," by Federico Echenique and Roland G. Fryer, Jr. (w11258, April 2005, .pdf format, 53p.).

Abstract:

This paper develops a measure of segregation based on two premises: (1) a measure of segregation should disaggregate to the level of individuals, and (2) an individual is more segregated the more segregated are the agents with whom she interacts. Developing three desirable axioms that any segregation measure should satisfy, we prove that one and only one segregation index satisfies our three axioms, and the two aims mentioned above; which we coin the Spectral Segregation Index. We apply the index to two well-studied social phenomena: residential and school segregation. We calculate the extent of residential segregation across major US cities using data from the 2000 US Census. The correlation between the Spectral index and the commonly-used dissimilarity index is .42. Using detailed data on friendship networks, available in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we calculate the prevalence of within-school racial segregation. The results suggests that the percent of minority students within a school, commonly used as a substitute for a measure of in-school segregation, is a poor proxy for social interactions.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11258

B. "Bargaining Power in Marriage: Earnings, Wage Rates and Household Production," by Robert A. Pollak (w11239, April 2005, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

What determines bargaining power in marriage? This paper argues that wage rates, not earnings, determine well-being at the threat point and, hence, determine bargaining power. Observed earnings at the bargaining equilibrium may differ from earnings at the threat point because hours allocated to market work at the bargaining solution may differ from hours allocated to market work at the threat point. In the divorce threat model, for example, a wife who does not work for pay while married might do so following a divorce; hence, her bargaining power would be related to her wage rate, not to her earnings while married. More generally, a spouse whose earnings are high because he or she chooses to allocate more hours to market work, and correspondingly less to household production and leisure, does not have more bargaining power. But a spouse whose earnings are high because of a high wage rate does have more bargaining power. Household production has received little attention in the family bargaining literature. The output of household production is analogous to earnings, and a spouse's productivity in household production is analogous to his or her wage rate. Thus, in a bargaining model with household production, a spouse's productivity in home production is a source of bargaining power.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w11239

C. "Births, Deaths, and New Deal Relief during the Great Depression," by Price V. Fishback, Michael R. Haines, and Shawn Kantor (w11246, April 2005, .pdf format, 58p.).

Abstract:

This paper examines the impact of New Deal relief programs on infant mortality, noninfant mortality and general fertility rates in major U.S. cities between 1929 and 1940. We estimate the effects using a variety of specifications and techniques for a panel of 114 cities for which data on relief spending during the 1930s were available. The significant rise in relief spending during the New Deal contributed to reductions in infant mortality, suicide rates, and some other causes of death, while contributing to increases in the general fertility rate. Estimates of the relationship between economic activity and death rates suggest that many types of death rates were pro-cyclical, similar to Ruhm's (2000) findings for the modern U.S.. Estimates of the relief costs associated with saving a life (adjusted for inflation) are similar to estimates found in studies of modern social insurance programs.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w11246

D. "A Tale of Two Labor Markets: Intergenerational Occupational Mobility in Britain and the U.S. Since 1850," by Jason Long and Joseph Ferrie (w11253, April 2005, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

The U.S. both tolerates more inequality than Europe and believes its economic mobility is greater than Europe's. These attitudes and beliefs help account for differences in the magnitude of redistribution through taxation and social welfare spending. In fact, the U.S. and Europe had roughly equal rates of inter-generational occupational mobility in the late twentieth century. We extend this comparison into the late nineteenth century using longitudinal data on 23,000 nationally-representative British and U.S. fathers and sons. The U.S. was substantially more mobile then Britain through 1900, so in the experience of those who created the U.S. welfare state in the 1930s, the U.S. had indeed been "exceptional." The margin by which U.S. mobility exceeded British mobility was erased by the 1950s, as U.S. mobility fell compared to its nineteenth century levels.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w11253
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Center for Health and Wellbeing [Princeton University]: "Cognitive Development Among Young Children in Ecuador: The Roles of Wealth, Health and Parenting," by Christina Paxson and Norbert Schady (March 2005, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

We examine the relationship between early cognitive development, socio-economic status (SES), child health, and parenting in a developing country. Using a sample of over 3000 preschool age children from Ecuador, we analyze determinants of children's scores on a widely used test of language ability. Household socioeconomic characteristics, in particular wealth and parental education, are "protective" children from wealthier households and with more educated parents have higher scores. This is especially true for older children. Child health and parenting quality are associated with test scores, and account for a portion, although not the majority, of the association between SES and cognitive development.

http://www.wws.princeton.edu/~chw/papers/paxson_schady_childrenecuador.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Medical Expenditure Panel Survey: "Health Behaviors and Labor Market Status: The Impact of Substance Abuse," by Samuel Zuvekas and Philip F. Cooper and Thomas C. Buchmueller (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, MEPS WP 05014, April 2005, .pdf format, 23p.).

Abstract:

Previous studies on the effects of illicit drug and alcohol consumption on labor market outcomes have been mixed, with some studies even finding positive effects of drug and alcohol use on wages and employment status. Buchmueller and Zuvekas (1998) argue that it is necessary to separate out moderate use from more problematic use or abuse in understanding labor market impacts. We extend their work in two important directions. First, we use data from the 1992 National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey (NLAES), which provides a larger (n=42,862) and nationally-representative survey, with improved labor market measures and similarly rich measures of alcohol and drug use and problems. Second, we jointly analyze the impacts of alcohol and drugs, whereas their previous work considered only drug use and abuse. Indeed, most of the previous literature focuses on either alcohol or drugs, but not both. Overall, we find that drug disorders are negatively associated with the probability of being employed but not earnings, while moderate drug use was not statistically associated with either outcome. We find no statistically significant effects of alcohol abuse on either employment or earnings.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=680
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "Are There Differences in the Health-Socioeconomic Status Relationship over the Life Cycle? Evidence from Germany," by Keith Bender and Steffen Habermalz (Discussion Paper No. 1560, April 2005, .pdf format, 19p.).

Abstract:

Most research on the relationship between health and socioeconomic status (SES) controls for changing age or investigates the relationship for a particular age range. This paper, however, examines changes in the relationship across ages, as well as controls for potential endogeneity in the health-SES relationship. Using data from German Socio Economic Panel, we find that the health-SES relationship does vary across the life cycle and that endogeneity is an important influence on the relationship. We also find tentative evidence that universal access to health care reduces the impact of income on self-reported health satisfaction.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1560.pdf

B. "Career Choice, Marriage-Timing, and the Attraction of Unequals," by Sylvain Dessy and Habiba Djebbari (Discussion Paper No. 1561, April 2005, .pdf format, 32p.).

Abstract:

Both men and women wish to have a family and a rewarding career. In this paper, we show that the under-representation of women in high-powered professions may reflect a coordination failure in young women's marriage-timing decisions. Since investing in a high-powered career imposes time strain, it precludes early participation in the marriage market. Delayed participation in the marriage market has a higher cost for women than for men because women have shorter fecundity horizons. Marriage prospects of high-powered women depend on the marriage-timing decisions of younger women. Under these assumptions, we show that women's marriage-timing decisions exhibit strategic complementarities. Coordination failures in women's marriage-timing decisions lead to persisting gender differences in career choices. Yet, differential fecundity is only necessary, but not sufficient to obtain gender inequality in high-powered professions. We discuss social changes that solve the coordination failure while achieving a Pareto-improvement in the society at large.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1561.pdf

Return to top

=========================================================================

TABLES OF CONTENTS:

Other Journals:

Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal (Vol. 33, No. 4, June 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://fcs.sagepub.com/content/vol33/issue4/

Return to top

=========================================================================

CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS:

Wildlife Conservation Society/Rockefeller University Conference Presentations: One World--One Health," a conference held Sep. 29, 2004 at Rockefeller University, New York, New York (Audio of presentations in MP3 format, video in QuickTime format, with slides in .jpg and .pdf format). "Health experts from around the world met on September 29, 2004 for a symposium focused on the current and potential movements of diseases among human, domestic animal, and wildlife populations organized by the Wildlife Conservation Society and hosted by The Rockefeller University. Using case studies on Ebola, Avian Influenza, and Chronic Wasting Disease as examples, the assembled expert panelists delineated priorities for an international, interdisciplinary approach for combating threats to the health of life on Earth."

http://www.oneworldonehealth.org/

Return to top

=========================================================================

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

National Institutes of Health:

A. "Review of Ranking Data" (NOT-OD-05-042, Apr. 11, 2005, ASCII text and comma separated value [.csv] format).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-05-042.html

B. "Methodology and Measurement in the Behavioral and Social Sciences" (PA-02-072, Apr. 15, 2005 reissuance). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-05-090.html

Return to top

=========================================================================

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

United Nations: The UN has recently announced two employment opportunities in the Population Affairs group: Population Affairs Office P/3 and P/4. For more information see:

https://jobs.un.org/Galaxy/Release3/vacancy/Display_Vac_List.aspx?lang=1200&OCCG=34

Return to top

=========================================================================

DATA:

Census Bureau: County Population Estimates: Apr. 1, 2000 - Jul. 1, 2004. The data (comma separated value [.csv] format with documentation in ASCII format) is linked to from a Census Bureau news release: "14 Florida Counties Among 100 Fastest-Growing: Flagler, Fla., Nation's Fastest-Growing County" (CB05-51, Apr. 14, 2005).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/004654.html

Click on "detailed tables and maps" for link to data.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Cancer Institute: "SEER 1973-2002 Public-Use Data." "NCI Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results public use data has been updated through 2002 (ASCII or binary format--for use with SEER*Stat extraction software). Interested researchers must sign off on a public-use data agreement before acquiring the data, either directly from the website, or via CD-ROM. "The SEER Public-Use Data include SEER incidence and population data associated by age, sex, race, year of diagnosis, and geographic areas (including SEER registry and county). A signed SEER Public-Use Data Agreement is required to access these data. Use of these data for publication purposes should contain a citation which includes submission and release dates."

http://seer.cancer.gov/publicdata/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

American Religion Data Archive [Pennsylvania State University]: "America's Evangelicals" (2004, SPSS Portable, ASCII, Microsoft Excel, and MicroCase 4.0 format, with documentation in compressed ASCII format."

http://www.thearda.com/file.asp?FILE=EVANGEL&Show=Description

Download options are on the left side of the page.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Panel Survey of Income Dynamics Update:

"Selected Variables from NCES CCD - A new file is posted to the CDS Data Group that contains information about the school that the CDS target child attended at the time of the CDS-I data collection. These data were collected in the U.S. Department of Education's Common Core of Data (CCD). The variables we have posted on the PSID-CDS Data Center are a small sampling of data on the school and school district environment through the CCD. Some examples of the data we have selected data are school type, racial/ethnic composition, pupil-teacher ratio, completion rates, and expenditures per child."

http://psidonline.isr.umich.edu/Guide/DataNewsDet.aspx?&ID=331
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

UK Data Archive (Essex University, Colchester, UK): The UK Data Archive has recently added the following dataset to its holdings. Note: There may be charges or licensing requirements on holdings of the UK Data Archive. For more information see:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/usingData/introduction.asp

General Household Survey, 2003-2004 (#5150)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/search/indexSearch.asp?ct=xmlSn&q1=5150

British Household Panel Survey; Waves 1-13, 1991-2004 (#5151)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/search/indexSearch.asp?ct=xmlSn&q1=5151

Family Resources Survey, 2003-2004 (#5139)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/search/indexSearch.asp?ct=xmlSn&q1=5139

Return to top

=========================================================================

WEBSITES OF INTEREST:

Kaiser Family Foundation: KFF has recently updated its "Trends and Indicators in the Changing Health Care Marketplace" website.

http://www.kff.org/insurance/7031/

Return to top

Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu