Current Demographic Research Report #73, March 7, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau News Release
Centers For Disease Control Periodical
National Center for Health Statistics Reports
DHHS SAMHSA Report
United Nations Report
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Reports
Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS Report
World Health Organization Report, Periodical, Article, News Release
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Report
Statistics South Africa Compendium
CIHI News Release
International Monetary Fund Periodical
Department of State Human Rights Country Reports
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistical Brief
DHHS OASPE Report
National Center for Education Research Reports
Bureau of Labor Statistics Periodical, Reports
Bureau of Justice Statistics Report
_Demographic Research_ Article
Rand Corporation Monograph
Population Reference Bureau Report
Urban Institute Reports
Alan Guttmacher Institute Periodical
Pew Hispanic Center Report
_Lancet_ Article, Book Review, Viewpoint, Series
Info Health Pop. Reporter

WORKING PAPERS

University of Wisconsin Center for Demography and Ecology
Max Planck Institute for Social and Demographic Research National Bureau of
Economic Research
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
London School of Economics Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE)
National Center for Social and Economic Modelling
Institute for Labour Market Policy Evaluation (IFAU)
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy [New Delhi, India]
IRSS CEPS/INSTEAD

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta
Other Journals

CONFERENCES

Bureau of Labor Statistics

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

National Institutes of Health

DATA

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)
National Center for Health Statistics
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth)
National Bureau of Statistics of China Announcement
World Health Organization Mortality Database
Pan American Health Organization

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REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC:

Census Bureau News Release: "Census Bureau Names Gerald W. Gates as First Chief Privacy Officer: Agency Also Launches New Web Page Devoted to Data Stewardship" (CB05-CN.01, Mar. 1, 2005).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/miscellaneous/004060.html

Link to Data Stewardship webpage is at top right of news release.
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Centers For Disease Control Periodical: The latest issue (Vol. 54, No. 8, Mar. 4, 2005) of _Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_ contains five articles on current influenza activity and one article on worldwide measles mortality, 1999-2003 (HTML and .pdf format).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwr_wk.html

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5408.pdf

Note: The HTML address is temporary. When the next _MMWR_ is released, this one will be available under: "Current Volume" on the left side of the page. As of Jan. 1, 2006, it will be available under "Past Volumes" on the left side of the page.
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National Center for Health Statistics Reports:

A. "Deaths: Leading Causes for 2002," by Robert N. Anderson, and Betty L. Smith (National and Vital Health Statistics Reports Vol. 53, No. 17, March 2005, .pdf format, 92p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr53/nvsr53_17.pdf

B. "Summary Health Statistics for U.S. Children: National Health Interview Survey, 2003," by A.N. Dey and B. Bloom (Vital and Health Statistics Series 10, No. 223, March 2005, .pdf format, 78p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_10/sr10_223.pdf

C. "Seroprevalence of six infectious diseases among adults in the United States by race/ethnicity: Data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-94," by Deanna Kruszon-Moran and Geraldine M. McQuillan (Advance Data from Vital and Health Statistics No. 352, March 2005, .pdf format, 12p.). "Data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-94."

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/ad/ad352.pdf
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Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Report: "Trends in Marijuana Treatment Admissions by State: 1992-2002" (Drug and Alcohol Services Information System (DASIS), March 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k5/MJstateTrends/MJstateTrends.cfm
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United Nations Report: "World Population Prospects: the 2004 Revision--Highlights (February 2005, .pdf format, 88p.).

http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/WPP2004/WPP2004Highlights_final.pdf

News release:

http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2005/pop918.doc.htm
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United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Reports:

A. "Low Birthweight: Country, Regional and Global Estimates," by Tessa Wardlaw, Ann Blanc, Jelka Zupan, and Elisabeth Åhman (December 2004, .pdf format, 27p.). "The reduction of low birthweight forms an important contribution to the Millennium Development Goal for reducing child mortality. But more than half of the infants born in the developing world are not weighed, posing a major challenge to measuring the global incidence of low birthweight. This joint WHO/UNICEF publication uses recently revised estimates to report on this condition that affects more than 20 million infants worldwide - almost 96% of infants born in developing countries."

http://57.69.14.59/publications/index_24840.html

PDF link leads to full text.

B. "The Impact of Conflict on Women and Girls in West and Central Africa and the UNICEF response," by Sherrill Whittington and Rima Salah (February 2005, .pdf format, 39p.).

http://57.69.14.59/publications/index_25262.html

PDF link leads to full text.

C. "Child poverty in rich countries 2005" (UNICEF Innocenti Research Center Report Card No. 6, 2005, .pdf format, 36p.).

http://www.unicef-icdc.org/publications/pdf/repcard6e.pdf
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Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS Report: "AIDS in Africa: Three scenarios to 2025" (March 2005, .pdf format, 28p.). "'AIDS in Africa: Three scenarios to 2025', a new report by UNAIDS, presents three possible case studies for how the AIDS epidemic in Africa could evolve over the next 20 years based on policy decisions taken today by African leaders and the rest of the world. The scenarios set out to answer one central question: 'Over the next 20 years, what factors will drive Africa's and the world's responses to the AIDS epidemic, and what kind of future will there be for the next generation?'"

http://www.unaids.org/en/AIDS+in+Africa_Three+scenarios+to+2025.asp
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World Health Organization Report, Periodical, Article, News Release:

A. "Poverty: Assessing the distribution of health risks by socioeconomic position at national and local levels," by Tony Blakely, Simon Hales and Alistair Woodward (WHO Environmental Burden of Disease, Series No. 10, 2004, .pdf format, 32p.).

http://www.who.int/quantifying_ehimpacts/publications/en/ebd10.pdf

B. _Bulletin of the World Health Organization_ (Vol. 83, No. 3, March 2005, HTML and.pdf format).

http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/83/3/en/

C. "Africa is worst hit by dual epidemic," by Clare Nullis-Kapp (WHO In Focus, Mar. 1, 2005).

http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/83/3/feature0305/en/

D. "Measles deaths worldwide drop by nearly 40% over 5 years" (WHO news release, Mar. 4, 2005).

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2005/pr11/en/index.html
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Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Report: "Health Inequalities in Australia: Mortality" (Health Inequalities Monitoring Series No. 1, March 2005, .pdf format, September 2004, .pdf format, 148p.). "Despite improvements in the health of Australians over the last century, large mortality inequalities continue to exist between population sub-groups. This report is a statistical reference source that documents mortality inequalities by sex, geographic region, area socioeconomic disadvantage, occupation and country of birth. The report examines the nature and extent of mortality inequalities among infants and children, young adults, working aged adults and older persons during 1998-2000, and where possible, for the period 1985-1987 to 1998-2000.

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10041
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Statistics South Africa Compendium: "Mortality and causes of death in South Africa, 1997-2003: Findings from death notification" (P0309.3, February 2005, .pdf format, 107p.). "This release is based on all death notification forms received from the Department of Home Affairs for the years 1997 to 2003. Mortality data are provided in numbers for 1997 to 2002 and in percentages for 1997 to 2003. Basic information on the causes of death is presented for all seven years, while a detailed analysis is provided for the years 1997, 1999 and 2001."

http://www.statssa.gov.za/publications/information.asp?ppn=fqtqz.t

Link from "pdf" at the bottom of the page.

Related _British Medical Journal_ News Roundup Article Extract: "Sharp rise in deaths in South Africa is largely due to AIDS," by Pat Sidley (Vol. 330, No. 7489, p. 438).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/330/7489/438-c
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Canadian Institute for Health Information/Institute canadien d'information sur la sante News Release: "Obesity Rates Lower in Schools With a Comprehensive Healthy Living Program: Study shows fifth-graders in Nova Scotia schools following CDC guidelines eat more fruits, vegetables" (Feb. 22, 2005).

http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/dispPage.jsp?cw_page=media_22feb2005_e
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International Monetary Fund Periodical: _Finance and Development_ (Vol. 42, No. 1, February 2005, .pdf format).

http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/fandd/2005/03/index.htm
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Department of State Human Rights Country Reports: "On February 28, 2005, Under Secretary for Global Affairs Paula Dobriansky held an On-the-Record briefing to announce the release of the 2004 Human Rights Reports. Acting Assistant Secretary for Democracy Human Rights and Labor Michael Kozak also gave remarks and answered questions. The report entitled "Country Reports on Human Rights Practices" is submitted to the Congress by the Department of State in compliance with sections 116(d) and 502B(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (FAA), as amended, and section 504 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended. The law provides that the Secretary of State shall transmit to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, by February 25 "a full and complete report regarding the status of internationally recognized human rights, within the meaning of subsection (A) in countries that receive assistance under this part, and (B) in all other foreign countries which are members of the United Nations and which are not otherwise the subject of a human rights report under this Act." We have also included reports on several countries that do not fall into the categories established by these statutes and that thus are not covered by the congressional requirement."

http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2004/
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Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistical Brief: "The Health Insurance Status of U.S. Workers, 2003: Estimates for Civilian Noninstitutionalized Workers Ages 16-64," by William Carroll (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, MEPS Statistical Brief No. 71, March 2005, .pdf format, 5p.).

Abstract:

This Statistical Brief summarizes data concerning the health insurance status of workers in the United States during the first half of 2003, as derived from the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-HC). The data examined indicate that certain job characteristics, such as self-employment, size of business, hourly wages, and weekly hours of work, are strongly associated with workers' health insurance status.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=672
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Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation Report: "Characteristics of Families Using Title IV-D Services in 1999 and 2001," by Linda Mellgren, Jennifer Burnszynski, Sarah Douglas, and Brian Sinclair-James (October 2004). Note: Tables for this report are available in a single file that can be linked to from the bottom of the report.

http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/CSE-Char04/index.htm
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National Center for Education Research Reports:

A. "Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2002-03," by J. Carl Setzer and Laurie Lewis (NCES 2005010, March 2005, .pdf format, 97p.).

Abstract:

This public school district survey is the first national survey to explore distance education courses for public elementary and secondary school students. The report provides national estimates of the number of districts and schools with students enrolled in distance education courses, as well as the number of enrollments in those courses. In addition, it examines the reported reasons for having distance education courses, the instructional level of the populations served, entities delivering the courses to students, and data pertaining to online courses. Data about curriculum areas and technology in distance education courses are also discussed. Survey findings are presented at the national level and by school district characteristics such as metropolitan status, district enrollment size, region, and poverty concentration.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005010

B. "2003-04 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:04): Student Financial Aid Estimates for 2003-04," by Lutz Berkner, Shirley He, Stephen Lew, Melissa Cominole, and Peter Siegel (NCES 2005158, February 2005, .pdf format, 47p.).

Abstract:

This report is the first publication based on the 2003-04 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:04) conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) within the U.S. Department of Education. NPSAS is a comprehensive survey that examines how students and their families pay for postsecondary education. The report describes the percentages of students receiving various types of financial aid and average amounts received, by type of institution attended, attendance pattern, dependency status, and income level.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005158

C. "Estimating Undergraduate Enrollment in Postsecondary Education Using National Center for Education Statistics Data," by David Hurst and Lisa Hudson (NCES 2005063, March 2005, .pdf format, 45p.).

Abstract:

A number of National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) surveys can be used to estimate enrollment levels in postsecondary education. Generating consistent enrollment estimates, however, is complicated by differences in surveys that lead to different enrollment counts. This report describes the process of generating comparable estimates of undergraduate enrollment in postsecondary institutions across four NCES data sets (CPS October Supplement, IPEDS, NHES, NPSAS). The report highlights differences across these surveys that may affect postsecondary enrollment estimates and describes how largely comparable estimates can be derived, given these differences.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005063
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Bureau of Labor Statistics Periodical, Reports:

A. _Monthly Labor Review_ (Vol. 128, No. 2, February 2005, .pdf format). This issue is devoted to the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth: 1979, as it celebrates its 25th anniversary.

http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/mlrhome.htm

Note: This is a temporary address. When the next _MLR_ is released, this one, along with all others back to 1983, will be available at:

http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/archive.htm

B. "Summary: Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses, 2003" (Summary 05-1, March 2005, .pdf format, 66p.).

http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/osh/os/ossm0014.pdf

C. "Employment from the BLS household and payroll surveys: summary of recent trends (March 2005, .pdf format, 16p.).

http://www.bls.gov/cps/ces_cps_trends.pdf

D. "Current Employment Statistics Highlights" (March 2005, .pdf format, 9p.).

http://www.bls.gov/ces/ceshighlights.pdf
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Bureau of Justice Statistics Report: "Crime and Victimization in the Three Largest Metropolitan Areas, 1980-98," by Janet L. Lauritsen and Robin J. Schaum (NCJ 208075, February 2005, ASCII text and .pdf format, with .zip compressed spreadsheets, 8p.).

Abstract:

Examines burglary, robbery, and aggravated assault in the metropolitan areas of New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles to assess changes in reporting to the police over time. Compares crime estimates for those crimes and areas from National Crime Victimization Survey, a household survey that records reported and unreported crimes, and the Uniform Crime Reports, submitted to the FBI from local law enforcement agencies based on citizen reports.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/cv3lma98.htm
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_Demographic Research_ Article: Note: _DR_ is "a free, expedited, peer-reviewed journal of the population sciences published by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research [Rostock, Germany]. "Women's sexual control within conjugal union: Implications for HIV/AIDS infection and control in a metropolitan city," by Peter Olasupo Ogunjuyigbe and Ezekiel O. Adeyemi (Vol. 12, Article 2, March 2005, .pdf format, p. 30-50).

Abstract:

This study attempts to examine the extent to which women have control over their sexuality within marriage and its implication for the spread of HIV/AIDS. The survey was carried out in metropolitan Lagos. The study shows that women have some control over their sexuality especially during certain occasions such as during menstruation, breastfeeding, pregnancy and when they are sick. However, only few women could negotiate with their husbands especially by insisting on safe sexual practices. The study therefore shows that women need to be educated on the need for safer sex practices, especially in this era of HIV/AIDS. They should also be economically empowered so as to practice safer sex. Again, men should be educated on the safer sex practices in other to control the spread of HIV/AIDS.

http://www.demographic-research.org/

Click on "Enter".
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Rand Corporation Monograph: _The Challenges of Creating a Global Health Resource Tracking System_," by Elisa Eiseman and Donna Fossum (2005, .pdf format, 140p.).

Abstract:

The RAND Corporation conducted interviews, consulted with experts, and carried out detailed analyses of existing tracking systems that focus on health resources flowing to and within developing countries, the objective being to determine how to provide a truly global health resource tracking system that will provide comprehensive, accurate, up-to-date data for policymakers and other users and will address the current systems' limitations.

http://www.rand.org/publications/MG/MG317/
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Population Reference Bureau Report: "Women in 2005: Are They Making Progress?" (March 2005, HTML with a datasheet in .pdf format, 12p.).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/05_Articles/Women_in_2005__Are_They_Making_Progress_.htm
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Urban Institute Reports:

A. "High-Income Families Benefit Most from New Education Savings Incentives," by Susan Dynarski (Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center Tax Policy Issues and Options, No. 9, February 2005, .pdf format, 5p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411147

B. "Homeless Living in Vacant Public Housing Units," by Mary K. Cunningham, Susan J. Popkin, Michael Eiseman, and Kadija Ferryman (March 2005, .pdf format, 37p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411144
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Alan Guttmacher Institute Periodical: _The Guttmacher Report on Public Policy_ (Vol. 8, No. 1, March 2005, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.agi-usa.org/pubs/tgr/08/1/index.html
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Pew Hispanic Center Report: "Survey of Mexican Migrants: Attitudes about Immigration and Major Demographic Characteristics," by Roberto Suro (March 2005, .pdf format, 35p.). The report is linked to from a PHC press release: "Extensive New Survey Examines Mexican Migrants' Views Toward Immigration Reform Proposals" (Mar. 2, 2005).

http://www.pewtrusts.org/news/news_subpage.cfm?content_item_id=2824&content_type_id=7&page=nr1

Report link is at the bottom of the press release.
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_Lancet_ Article, Book Review, Viewpoint, Series: Note: _Lancet_ requires free registration before providing content.

A. "Russia's population crisis," by Tom Parfitt (Vol. 365, No. 9461, Feb. 26, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, p. 743-744).

HTML:

http://www.thelancet.com/journal/vol365/iss9461/full/llan.365.9461.analysis_and_interpretation.32425.1

.pdf:

http://pdf.thelancet.com/pdfdownload?uid=llan.365.9461.analysis_and_interpretation.32425.1&x=x.pdf

B. "The decline and fall of societies, a book review of _Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed_, by Jared Diamond, reviewed by Richard Fortey (Vol. 365, No. 9461, Feb. 26, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, p. 745-747).

HTML:

http://www.thelancet.com/journal/vol365/iss9461/full/llan.365.9461.analysis_and_interpretation.32373.1

.pdf:

http://pdf.thelancet.com/pdfdownload?uid=llan.365.9461.analysis_and_interpretation.32373.1&x=x.pdf

C. "How much would poor people gain from faster progress towards the Millennium Development Goals for health?" by Davidson R Gwatkin (Viewpoint, Vol. 365, No. 9461, Feb. 26, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, p. 813-817).

HTML:

http://www.thelancet.com/journal/vol365/iss9461/full/llan.365.9461.review_and_opinion.32382.1

.pdf:

http://pdf.thelancet.com/pdfdownload?uid=llan.365.9461.review_and_opinion.32382.1&x=x.pdf

D. _Lancet_ Neonatal Survival Series: (Vol. 365, No. 9462, Mar. 5, 2005, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.thelancet.com/journal/vol365/iss9462/full/llan.365.9462.neonatal_survival_series.32489.1
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Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (Vol. 5, No. 10, Mar. 7, 2005). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

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WORKING PAPERS:

University of Wisconsin Center for Demography and Ecology:

A. "Youth Responses to Expected Income and 'Relationship' Consequences in Nonmarital Childbearing Choices: Are Youths Rational?" by Barbara Wolfe, Karen Pence, and Robert Haveman (Working Paper 2004-20, 2005, .pdf format, 43p.)

Abstract:

We hypothesize that the choices and behaviors of youths that may result in a teen nonmarital birth event are influenced by expectations of the consequences of each choice open to them. Two categories of such choice-conditioned long-term effects are explored: 1) a teen's expected personal income stream, and 2) the probability that she will establish a long-term and stable family-type relationship. We also measure the effects of an extensive list of other factors, including the characteristics of the girl's family and its choices, the social and economic environment in which she lives (including policy-related factors, such as public expenditures by states on family planning programs), her neighborhood's characteristics and her own prior choices. The empirical work uses the Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics. The results provide evidence that both expected relationship stability and personal income differences play a role in influencing these choices with a suggestion that relationship stability may have greater weight. The results also suggest an important role for public family planning expenditures.

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cde/cdewp/2004-20.pdf

B. "The Role of Expectations in Adolescent Schooling Choices: Do Youths Respond to Economic Incentives?" by Kathryn Wilson, Barbara Wolfe, and Robert Haveman (Working Paper 2004-21, 2005, .pdf format, 64p.).

Abstract:

We address the role of youths' own choice-conditioned expectations in understanding their schooling choices by constructing a choice (or "switching") model. We emphasize the effect of individual student perceptions regarding the "returns" associated with graduating from high school versus dropping out, while controlling for an extensive set of family and community factors. We find that youths' expected income returns to graduating from high school are influential in their schooling choices, even when an extensive set of background, economic, family, and neighborhood variables, designed to capture the effects of parental and governmental decisions, is introduced into the analysis.

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cde/cdewp/2004-21.pdf
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Max Planck Institute for Social and Demographic Research [Rostock, Germany]: "Fertility and spatial mobility: evidence from Austria," by Hill Kulu (WP-2005-002, February 2005, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

There is a growing body of literature looking at the interplay between an individual's residential and other careers in the life-course. Previous research has mostly studied the impact of partnership and employment changes on spatial mobility. This paper focuses on the effect of childbearing on migrations and residential moves. We base our study on retrospective event-history data from Austria and apply intensity regression. Our analysis shows, first, that the birth of a child triggers housing- and environment-related residential relocations. Second, it significantly reduces couples' wish and chances of moving over long distances for a job. The event of first conception also induces moves related to partnership formation.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/Papers/Working/wp-2005-002.pdf
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National Bureau of Economic Research: "Selection, Investment, and Women's Relative Wages Since 1975," by Casey B. Mulligan and Yona Rubinstein (w11159, February 2005, .pdf format, 42p.).

Abstract:

In theory, growing wage inequality within gender should cause women to invest more in their market productivity and should differentially pull able women into the workforce, thereby closing the measured gender gap even though women's wages might have grown less than men's had their behavior been held constant. Using the CPS repeated cross-sections between 1975 and 2001, we use control function (Heckit) methods to correct married women's conditional mean wages for selectivity and investment biases. Our estimates suggest that selection of women into the labor market has changed sign, from negative to positive, or at least that positive selectivity bias has come to overwhelm investment bias. The estimates also explain why measured women's relative wage growth coincided with growth of wage inequality within-gender, and attribute the measured gender wage gap closure to changing selectivity and investment biases, rather than relative increases in women's earning potential. Using PSID waves 1975-93 to control for the changing female workforce with person-fixed effects, we also find little growth in women's mean log wages. Finally, we make a first attempt to gauge the relative importance of selection versus investment biases, by examining the family and cognitive backgrounds of members of the female workforce. PSID, NLS, and NLSY data sets show how the cross-section correlation between female employment and family/cognitive background has changed from "negative" to "positive" over the last thirty years, in amounts that might be large enough to attribute most of women's relative wage growth to changing selectivity bias.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11159
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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "Does Wage Rank Affect Employees' Wellbeing?" by Gordon D. A. Brown, Jonathan Gardner, Andrew J. Oswald, and Jing Qian (Discussion Paper 1505, March 2005, .pdf format, 54p.).

Abstract:

What makes workers happy? Here we argue that pure "rank" matters. It is currently believed that wellbeing is determined partly by an individual's absolute wage (say, 30,000 dollars a year) and partly by the individual's relative wage (say, 30,000 dollars compared to an average in the company or neighborhood of 25,000 dollars). Our evidence shows that this is inadequate. The paper demonstrates that range-frequency theory--a model developed independently within psychology and unknown to most economists--predicts that wellbeing is gained partly from the individual's ranked position of a wage within a comparison set (say, whether the individual is number 4 or 14 in the wage hierarchy of the company). We report an experimental study and an analysis of a survey of 16,000 employees' wage satisfaction ratings. We find evidence of rank-dependence in workers' pay satisfaction.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1505.pdf

B. "The Effect of Age at School Entry on Educational Attainment in Germany," by Michael Fertig and Jochen Kluve (Discussion Paper 1507, March 2005, .pdf format, 34p.).

Abstract:

Determining the optimal age at which a child should enter school is a controversial topic in education policy. In particular, German policy makers, pedagogues, parents, and teachers have since long discussed whether the traditional, established age of school entry at 6 years remains appropriate. Policies of encouraging early school entry or increased consideration of a particular child's competency for school ("Schulfahigkeit") have been suggested. Using a dataset capturing children who entered school in the late 1960s through the late 1970s, a time when delaying enrollment was common, we investigate the effect of age at school entry on educational attainment for West and East Germany. Empirical results from linear probability models and matching suggest a qualitatively negative relation between the age at school entry and educational outcomes both in terms of schooling degree and probability of having to repeat a grade. These findings are likely driven by unobserved ability differences between early and late entrants. We therefore use a cut-off date rule and the corresponding age at school entry according to the regulation to instrument the actual age at school entry. The IV estimates suggest there is no effect of age at school entry on educational performance.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1507.pdf

C. "Child Poverty and Family Transfers in Southern Europe," by Manos Matsaganis, Cathal O'Donoghue, Horacio Levy, Manuela Coromaldi, Magda Mercader-Prats, Carlos Farinha Rodrigues, Stefano Toso, and Panos Tsakloglou (Discussion Paper 1509, March 2005, .pdf format, 47p.).

Abstract:

The drive to reduce child poverty is of particular interest in southern Europe, where the subsidiary role of the State in matters of family policy has implied that programmes of public assistance to poor families with children are often meagre or not available at all. The paper examines the effect of family transfers (used broadly to include contributory family allowances, non-contributory child benefits and tax credits or allowances) on child poverty in Greece, Italy, Spain and Portugal. Using the European microsimulation model EUROMOD, the paper first assesses the distributional impact of existing family transfers and then explores the scope for policy reforms. By way of illustration, the effects of universal child benefit schemes similar to those in Britain, Denmark and Sweden are simulated. The paper concludes with a discussion of key findings and policy implications.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1509.pdf
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London School of Economics Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE): "Helter Skelter: Families, disabled children and the benefit system," by Gabrielle Preston (CASEPaper 92, February 2005, .pdf format, 87p.).

Abstract:

Families with disabled children are susceptible to poverty because low income is compounded by high costs. Combing caring with employment is extremely difficult, so families are heavily reliant upon benefits. But do disability benefits provide financial security for families who are susceptible to high levels of poverty and social exclusion? This qualitative study, based on semi-structured interviews with 20 families who have a disabled child or children, investigates their experience of applying for disability living allowance (DLA) and how they use additional benefit income. Families report that DLA makes a significant difference, not just for the disabled child but for the whole family. However, the fact that DLA is repeatedly downrated or withdrawn generates considerable fluctuations in income and high levels of stress and ill health. The report outlines issues that must be addressed if reduce poverty amongst disabled children is to be reduced.

http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/dps/case/cp/CASEpaper92.pdf
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National Center for Social and Economic Modelling (Canberra, Australia University): "The effectiveness of Child Care Benefit at improving returns to work for women," by Matthew Toohey (Conference Paper CP0501, February 2005, .pdf format, 19p.).

Abstract:

The costs of child care can substantially reduce the returns to work for families with children. This is especially important for women, who often have a weaker attachment to the labour force than men. Subsidies for child care, such as the federal government?s Child Care Benefit, help to offset the cost of child care and boost the financial benefits of paid work by women. In this paper, I examine how effective Child Care Benefit is at improving the returns to work for women with young children. I compare the effectiveness of Child Care Benefit for lone and partnered mothers with different levels of income and numbers of children using STINMOD, NATSEM's static microsimulation model of the income tax and social security systems.

http://www.natsem.canberra.edu.au/publication.jsp?titleID=CP0501

Link to full text is at the bottom of the abstract.
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Institute for Labour Market Policy Evaluation (IFAU), Swedish Ministry of Industry, Employment and Communications [Uppsala]: "School Choice and Segregation: Evidence From an Admission Reform," by Martin Soderstroma and Roope Uusitalob (Working Paper 2005-7, January 2005, .pdf format, 25p.).

Abstract:

This paper studies the effects of school choice on segregation. We analyze the effect of a reform in Stockholm that changed the admission system of public upper secondary schools. Before the year 2000, students had priority to the school situated closest to where they lived, but from the fall of 2000 and onwards, admission is based on grades only. We show that the distribution of students over schools changed dramatically as a response to extending school choice. As expected, the new admission policy increased segregation by ability. However, segregation by family background, as well as, segregation between immigrants and natives also increased significantly.

http://www.ifau.se/swe/pdf2005/wp05-07.pdf
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National Institute of Public Finance and Policy [New Delhi, India]: "Cities with Suburbs: Evidence from India," by Kala Seetharam Sridhar (WP 23, December 2004, .pdf format, 46p.).

Abstract:

For a country like India that contains a large number of Urban Agglomerations (UAs), suburbanisation has drawn little attention of the literature. I focus on this sparsely studied issue in this work. I calculate population, household and employment density gradients for India's UAs, using Mills' two-point technique. Next, I estimate population, household and employment gradient regressions. I find that the size of UA and lagged value of the population gradient explain population suburbanisation, as we would expect. I find evidence from the employment suburbanisation equation that it is the jobs that follow people, and not vice-versa, consistent with what has been found in the literature. In the employment sub-sector regressions, I find that the skills of the labor force are the most important factor explaining suburbanisation of manufacturing, transport, communications and trade/commerce jobs in India's urban areas. I conclude with policy implications.

http://www.nipfp.org.in/working%20paper%5Cwp23.pdf
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IRSS CEPS/INSTEAD (Integrated Research Infrastructure in the Socio-economic Sciences, Centre d'Etudes de Populations, de Pauvrete et de Politiques Socio-Economiques/International Networks for Studies in Technology, Environment, Alternatives, Development [Luxembourg]: "Income inequality and self-rated health status: Evidence from the European Community Household Panel," by Vincent Hildebrand and Philippe Van Kerm (Working Paper 2005-01, January 2005, .pdf format, 57p.).

Abstract:

We examine the effect of income inequality on individual self-rated health status in a pooled sample of 10 member states of the European Union using longitudinal data from the European Community Household Panel (ECHP) survey. Taking advantage of the longitudinal and cross-national nature of our data, and carefully modelling the self-reported health information, we avoid several of the pitfalls suffered by earlier studies on this topic. We calculate income inequality indices measured at two standard levels of geography (NUTS-0 and NUTS-1) and find consistent evidence that income inequality is negatively related to self-rated health status in the European Union for both men and women. However, despite its statistical significance, the magnitude of the impact of inequality on health is small.

http://www.ceps.lu/iriss/documents/irisswp52.pdf

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "advanced search"
C. Type in your publication name and click "Exact title" radio button
D. Under "Show", click the "fax/ariel" radio button.
E. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

Economic Development and Cultural Change (Vol. 53, No. 2, 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

Journal of Social Issues (Vol. 61, No. 1, 2005).
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Other Journals

AIDS (Vol. 19, No. 4, Mar. 4, 2005).

http://www.aidsonline.com/pt/re/aids/issuelist.htm

Journal of Family History (Vol. 30, No. 2, April 2005).

http://jfh.sagepub.com/content/vol30/issue2/?etoc

Population Research and Policy Review (Vol. 24, No. 2, April 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.springerlink.com/app/home/journal.asp?wasp=3egvylvymncg11l4fatn&referrer=parent&backto=browsepublicationsresults,1951,2424;

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CONFERENCES:

Bureau of Labor Statistics: "NLS User Conference 2005," to be held in Columbus, Ohio, Jun. 27-30, 2005. "BLS and NICHD are sponsoring two concurrent workshops in Columbus, Ohio from June 27-30, 2005. The NLSY79 Young Adult Research Workshop will focus on the Young Adult surveys. This workshop is designed to be hands-on and geared toward graduate students, recent PhDs and more established researchers interested in developing a concrete research project focused on this transitional life course stage. The second workshop is a more general User Workshop on the National Longitudinal Surveys aimed at new users interested in learning about various NLS cohorts including the NLSY79, the newest NLSY97, and the original cohorts, as well as the NLSY79 Child and Young Adult Surveys." For more information see:

http://www.bls.gov/nls/userconference/summer2005.htm

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FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

National Institutes of Health: "Delays in Grant Application Submission due to Recent Severe Winter Weather" (NOT-OD-05-035, March 2005). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-05-035.html

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DATA:

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR): ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Historical, Demographic, Economic, and Social Data: The United States, 1790-2000 (#2896)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/02896.xml
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National Center for Health Statistics:

A. "National Survey of Children's Health" (March 2005, data in .zip compressed SAS version 8 format, documentation in ASCII or .pdf format). "This survey, sponsored by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration, examines the physical and emotional health of children ages 0-17 years of age. Special emphasis is placed on factors that may relate to well-being of children, including medical homes, family interactions, parental health, school and after-school experiences, and safe neighborhoods."

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/major/slaits/nsch.htm

B. "National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) 2003 Imputed Family Income/Personal Earnings Files" (March 2005, data files in self decompressing (.exe) ASCII format, documentation in .pdf format).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/major/nhis/2003imputedincome.htm
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National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth): The University of North Carolina Population AddHealth Study has made an announcement about the availability of network structure files. For more information see the posting under "Network Structure Files" at:

http://www.cpc.unc.edu/projects/addhealth/news
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National Bureau of Statistics of China Announcement: The NBS has announced the availability of Tabulation of 2000 Population Census of China; China Population by Township; and China Population E-Atlas. Data files are available on CD-ROM (HTML and Microsoft Excel format). The E-Atlas is in Chinese. The announcement is not clear on the language of the data tabulations. For more information see:

http://www.stats.gov.cn/english/newrelease/publications/t20050303_402232913.htm

Note: Cancel any request to download a Chinese language character set. This announcement is in English.
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World Health Organization Mortality Database: The WHO Mortality Database has been updated. Sections updated as of Mar. 4, 2005 are: documentation (.zip compressed Microsoft Word format); availability.zip (.zip compressed Microsoft Excel format, Contains an Excel file with the list of countries-years available for the mortality and population data); pop.zip (Reference populations and live births (for regular users, figures are now in units, .zip compressed ASCII data); morticd9 and 10 (.zip compressed ASCII data). For more information see:

http://www3.who.int/whosis/mort/text/download.cfm?path=whosis,whsa,mort_download&language=english

Links are at the bottom of the page.
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Pan American Health Organization: "2004: Number of Reported Cases of Dengue & Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF),Region of the Americas (by country and subregion)" (March 2005).

http://www.paho.org/English/AD/DPC/CD/dengue-cases-2004.htm

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu