Current Demographic Research Report #64, January 4, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau News Releases, Reports
National Institutes of Health News Release
DHHS SAMHSA Reports
US Government Accountability Office Report
National Center for Education Statistics Compendium
Bureau of Labor Statistics News Release, Periodicals, Notice
Bureau of Justice Statistics Reports
US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Reports
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistical Briefs
World Health Organization Tsunami Situation Reports, Periodical
_Demographic Research_ Article
Carolina Population Center MEASURE Evaluation Report
Kaiser Family Foundation Issue Brief
Urban Institute Report
Allen Guttmacher Institute News Release, Reports
Population Reference Bureau Chartbook
Pew Charitable Trusts Report
Info Health Pop. Reporter
_Nature_ Letter to _Nature_ Abstract
_Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences_ Article Abstract
_Los Angeles Times_ Series

WORKING PAPERS

University of Wisconsin Center for Demography and Ecology
Rand Corporation Labor and Population Program
Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Population Council
National Bureau of Economic Research
Washington University at St. Louis Economics Working Paper Archive
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey
London School of Economics Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion
Bank of England
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Institute for Social And Economic Research (ISER)
Mannheim Research Institute for the Economics of Aging (MEA)
Institutionen for Nationalekonomi (Umea University)

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta
Other Journals

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

Kaiser Family Foundation
National Institutes of Health
National Science Foundation

DATA

ICPSR SAMHDA
Monitoring the Future Data Tables
Luxembourg Income Study
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey

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REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC:

Census Bureau News Releases, Reports:

A. "Nation Adds 3 Million People in Last Year; Nevada Again Fastest-Growing State" (CB04-246, Dec. 22, 2004, Microsoft Excel and .pdf tables, with links to detailed state tables in multiple formats).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/003153.html

B. "Census Bureau Projects Nation's Population to Total 295 Million on New Year's Day" (CB04-247, Dec. 28, 2004).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/003161.html

C. Meeting 21st Century Demographic Data Needs--Implementing the American Community Survey. The ACS has added a new methodology report: "Testing Voluntary Methods - Additional Results," by Deborah H. Griffin, Joan K.Broadwater, Theresa F. Leslie,Pamela D. McGovern, and David A. Raglin (Report No. 11, .pdf format, 35p.).

http://www.census.gov/acs/www/AdvMeth/Reports.htm

Click on "Report 11" for full text.

D. "Notes and Errata: 2000 Census of Population and Housing" (SF/01-ER), December 2004, .pdf format, 284p.).

http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/notes/errata.pdf
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National Institutes of Health News Release: "Eating at Fast-food Restaurants More than Twice Per Week is Associated with More Weight Gain and Insulin Resistance in Otherwise Healthy Young Adults" (Dec. 30, 2004).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/dec2004/nhlbi-30.htm
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Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Reports:

A. "Health Services Utilization by Individuals with Substance Abuse and Mental Disorders, 2002" edited by Carol L. Council (December 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 185p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/HSR/toc.htm

B. "Driving Under the Influence (DUI) Among Young Persons" (National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), December 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k4/youthDUI/youthDUI.cfm
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US Government Accountability Office Report: "Rural Housing: Changing the Definition of Rural Could Improve Eligibility Determinations" (GAO-05-110, December 2004, .pdf format, 22p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05110.pdf

Note: This is a temporary addresses. GAO reports are always available at:

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gaoreports/index.html
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National Center for Education Statistics Compendium: _Digest of Education Statistics, 2003_, by Thomas D. Snyder, Alexandra G. Tan and Charlene M. Hoffman (NCES 2005025, December 2004, .pdf format 577p., with tables in HTML and Microsoft Excel format).

Abstract:

The Digest of Education Statistics provides a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. Topics in the Digest include: the number of schools and colleges; teachers; enrollments; graduates; educational attainment; finances; federal funds for education; employment and income of graduates; libraries; technology; and international comparisons.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005025
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Bureau of Labor Statistics News Release, Periodicals, Notice:

A. "Work Experience of the Population 2003" (Dec. 22, 2004, HTML, ASCII text, and .pdf format, 9p.).

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/work.toc.htm

B. _Occupational Outlook Quarterly Online_ (Vol. 48, No. 3, Fall 2004, .pdf format).

http://www.bls.gov/opub/ooq/archive.htm

C. "Notice of Series Change with the Release of Data on February 4, 2005" (Dec. 21, 2004).

http://www.bls.gov/ces/cesnewseries.htm
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Bureau of Justice Statistics Reports:

A. "Felony Sentences in State Courts, 2002," by Matthew R. Durose and Patrick A. Langan (NCJ 206916, December 2004, ASCII text and .pdf format, 12p., with .zip compressed spreadsheets).

Abstract:

Presents statistics for adults who were convicted of a felony and sentenced in State courts. The data were collected through a nationally representative survey of 300 counties in 2002. Within the 12 offense categories reported are the number and characteristics (age, sex, race) of offenders who were sentenced to prison, jail, or probation. Trends from 1994 to 2002 highlight the number and characteristics of adults convicted of felonies and the types and lengths of sentences imposed. This periodic report is published every two years.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/fssc02.htm

B. "American Indians and Crime: A BJS Statistical Profile, 1992-2002," by Steven W. Perry (NCJ 203097, December 2004, ASCII text and .pdf format, 56p., with .zip compressed spreadsheets).

Abstract:

Summarizes data on American Indians in the criminal justice system and reports the rates and characteristics of violent crimes experienced by American Indians. This report updates a previous BJS report, American Indians and Crime, published in 1999. The findings include the involvement of alcohol, drugs, and weapons in violence against Indians. The report describes victim-offender relationships, the race of those involved in violence against Indians, and the rate of reporting to police by victims. It discusses the rates of arrest, suspect investigations and charges filed, and incarceration of Indians for violent crimes.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/aic02.htm
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US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Reports:

A. "Supermarket Characteristics and Operating Costs in Low-Income Areas," by Robert P. King, Ephraim S. Leibtag, and Ajay S. Behl (Agricultural Economic Report AER839, December 2004, .pdf format, 17p.).

Abstract:

Whether the poor pay more for food than other income groups is an important question in food price policy research. Stores serving low-income shoppers differ in important ways from stores that receive less of their revenues from Food Stamp redemptions. Stores with more revenues from Food Stamps are generally smaller and older, and offer relatively fewer convenience services for shoppers. They also offer a different mix of products, with a relatively high portion of sales coming from meat and private-label products. Metro stores with high Food Stamp redemption rates lag behind other stores in the adoption of progressive supply chain and human resource practices. Finally, stores with the highest Food Stamp redemption rates have lower sales margins relative to other stores, but have significantly lower payroll costs as a percentage of sales. Overall, operating costs for stores with high Food Stamp redemption rates are not significantly different from those for stores with moderate Food Stamp redemption rates. If the poor do pay more, factors other than operating costs are likely to be the reason.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/aer839/

B. "Effects of Food Assistance and Nutrition Programs on Nutrition and Health: Volume 4, Executive Summary of the Literature Review," by Mary Kay Fox, William Hamilton, and Biing-Hwan Lin (Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Report No. FANRR19-4, December 2004, .pdf format, 174p.).

Abstract:

This report provides a summary of a comprehensive review and synthesis of published research on the impact of USDA's domestic food and nutrition assistance programs on participants' nutrition and health outcomes. The outcome measures reviewed include food expenditures, household nutrient availability, dietary intake, other measures of nutrition status, food security, birth outcomes, breastfeeding behaviors, immunization rates, use and cost of health care services, and selected non-health outcomes, such as academic achievement and school performance (children) and social isolation (elderly). The report is one of four volumes produced by a larger study that includes Volume 1, Research Design; Volume 2, Data Sources; Volume 3, Literature Review; and Volume 4, Executive Summary of the Literature Review. The review examines the research on 15 USDA food assistance and nutrition programs but tends to focus on the largest ones for which more research is available: food stamps, school feeding programs, and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children(WIC). Over half of USDA's budget--$41.6 billion in fiscal year 2003--was devoted to food assistance and nutrition programs that provide low-income families and children with access to a healthy diet.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/fanrr19%2D4/

Note: There are links at the bottom of the page to all other ERS FANRR reports on this topic. Items 4-8 (Reports I-IV) are newly available from ERS.
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Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistical Briefs:

A. "Characteristics of Persons Who Seldom or Never Wear Seat Belts, 2002," by May Chu (Agency for Healhtcare Research and Quality, MEPS Statistical Brief #62, December 2004, .pdf format, 6p.).

Abstract:

Using data from the Household Component of the 2002 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-HC), this Statistical Brief examines a number of characteristics associated with the reported non-use or limited use of seat belts among persons between the ages of 16 and 64 in the U.S. civilian non-institutionalized population during 2002.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=655

B. "Top 10 Outpatient Prescription Medicines Ranked by Utilization and Expenditures for the U.S. Community Population, 2002," by Marie N. Stagnitti (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, MEPS Statistical Brief #60, December 2004, .pdf format, 4p.).

Abstract:

Using estimates derived from the Household Component of the 2002 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, this Statistical Brief provides a summary of the top 10 outpatient prescription medicines by utilization and expenditures as reported by households in the U.S. civilian non-institutionalized (community) population in calendar year 2002.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=644
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World Health Organization Tsunami Situation Reports, Periodical:

A. "South Asia Tsunami Situation Reports." WHO is making these reports available at this site as they are produced. Watch the site for more reports.

http://www.who.int/hac/crises/international/asia_tsunami/sitrep/en/

B. _Bulletin of the World Health Organization_ (Vol. 83, No. 1, January 2005, .pdf format).

http://www.who.int/bulletin/en/

Note: This is a temporary address. All _BWHOs_ back to 1947 are available at:

http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/en/
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_Demographic Research_ Article: Note: _DR_ is "a free, expedited, peer-reviewed journal of the population sciences published by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research." "Childbearing patterns for Swedish mothers of twins, 1961-1999," by Jan M. Hoem and Margit Strandberg (Vol. 11, Article 15, December 2004, .pdf format, p. 421-454).

Abstract:

The Nordic population registers provide a unique possibility to study the demographic behavior of very small population groups and rare events. In this paper, we study the childbearing behavior of Swedish mothers of twins between 1961 and 1999, inclusive. Our most consistent finding is that mothers of twins wait noticeably longer than women with singletons before they have another child. This apart, mothers with twins at their first birth have next-birth fertility patterns very similar to women who have two singletons at their first two births. This commonality in child-bearing behavior does not extend to higher-order births. For mothers with a singleton and a pair of twins, the progression to a third birth depends very much on whether the twins came first or second. Beside these main results our fascinating material also provides a number of descriptive findings. The Swedish twinning rate has increased since the mid-1970s in response to a growing use of fertility-stimulating treatments such as in-vitro fertilization, in parallel with similar developments in many other countries. Such medical procedures are applied mainly to women beyond prime childbearing ages. Nevertheless, we find no simple age pattern in twinning rates. Even in recent years they do not just in-crease with the woman's age. By way of contrast, at parities beyond 3 twinning rates increase with parity when we control for calendar period, time since last previous birth, and (NB) the woman's own age.

http://www.demographic-research.org/

Click on "Enter".
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Carolina Population Center MEASURE Evaluation Report: "AIDS in Africa During the Nineties: Kenya: A Review and Analysis of Survey Research Results" (SR-04-27, 2004, .pdf format, 69p.)

http://www.cpc.unc.edu/measure/publications/pdf/sr-04-32.pdf
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Kaiser Family Foundation Issue Brief: "Uninsured and Underserved: The Health Care Experiences of Latinos in the Nation's Capital" (December 2004, .pdf format, 16p.).

Abstract:

A summary of Latino experiences and opinions regarding access to health care in the District of Columbia, this brief also contrasts the experiences of Latinos in the District of Columbia with those of Latinos nationally.

http://www.kff.org/minorityhealth/7229.cfm
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Urban Institute Report: "Leave No City Behind: England/United States Dialogue on Urban Education Reform," by Jane Hannaway, Marilyn Murphy, and Jodie Reed (December 2004, .pdf format, 5p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311123
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Allen Guttmacher Institute News Release, Reports:

A. "Top Ten Ways Sexual and Reproductive Health Suffered in 2004" (Dec. 20, 2004).

http://www.guttmacher.org/media/nr/2004/12/20/index.html

B. "Contraceptive Needs and Services, 2001-2002" (2004, .pdf format). "Women between the ages of 13 and 44 who are sexually active and able to become pregnant, but do not wish to become pregnant, are in need of contraceptive services and supplies. Those who are poor or low-income, as well as teenagers, may need subsidized care. These tables report on the current status of contraceptive needs and services in the United States as a whole, for the 10 federal regions and for each state and county." Included are national, state, and county tables.

http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/win/index.html
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Population Reference Bureau Chartbook: "HIV/AIDS in Karnataka [India]: Situation and Response (December 2004, .pdf format, 32p., English and Hindi).

http://www.prb.org/Content/ContentGroups/04_Reports/karnataka-hiv.pdf
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Pew Charitable Trusts Report: "Dispersal and Concentration: Patterns of Latino Residential Settlement," by Roberto Suro and Sonya Tafoya (December 2004, .pdf format, 22p.). The report is linked to from a Pew News release: "Dispersal and Concentration: Patterns of Latino Residential Settlement" (Dec. 27, 2004).

http://www.pewtrusts.org/news/news_subpage.cfm?content_item_id=2782&content_type_id=7&page=nr1

Click on report title at the bottom of the news release for full text.

More information on Pew Charitable Trusts:

http://www.pewtrusts.org/about/index.cfm
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Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (Vol. 4, Nos. 52, 53 Dec. 27, 2004, Jan. 3, 2005 ). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

Note: Click on "2004" for Issue No. 52.
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_Nature_ Letter to _Nature_ Abstract: "High-quality Male Field Crickets Invest Heavily in Sexual Display but Die Young," by John Hunt, Robert Brooks, Michael D. Jennions, Michael J. Smith, Caroline L. Bentsen, and Luc F. Bussiere (Vol. 432, No. 7020, Dec. 23, 2004, p. 1024 - 1027).

http://www.nature.com/cgi-taf/Dynapage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v432/n7020/abs/nature03084_fs.html
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_Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences_ Article Abstract: "Emergent trade-offs and selection for outbreak frequency in spatial epidemics," by W. Marijn van Ballegooijen and Maarten C. Boerlijst (Vol. 101, No. 52, Dec. 28, 2004, p. 18246-18250).

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/101/52/18246?etoc
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_Los Angeles Times_ Series: Note: _LAT_ requires free registration before providing articles: "The New Deal." This series of articles dealing with family income " measuring the changing risks that working Americans face," using data from the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research Panel Study of Income Dynamics. The articles are: "How Just a Handful of Setbacks Sent the Ryans Tumbling Out of Prosperity," (Dec. 30, 2004); "The Poor Have More Things Today -- Including Wild Income Swings (Dec. 12, 2004); and "If America Is Richer, Why Are Its Families So Much Less Secure? (Oct. 10, 2004), all by Peter G. Gosselin. In addition to these articles, there is also a link at the site to a methodological article: "The Source of the Statistics and How They Were Analyzed" (Dec. 30, 2004).

http://www.latimes.com/newdeal

Links to the other articles are on the right side of the page, under "Related Stories."

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WORKING PAPERS:

University of Wisconsin Center for Demography and Ecology:

A. "Coresidence with Parents, the 'Comforts of Home,' and the Transition to Marriage among Japanese Women," by James M. Raymo and Hiromi Ono (WP 2004-16, July 2004, .pdf format 35p.).

Abstract:

Unlike their counterparts in most industrialized societies, Japanese women are spending an increasingly longer proportion of their young adult years unmarried and living with parents. In this paper, we develop hypotheses linking the "comforts of home" to later marriage in Japan. To evaluate these hypotheses, we use six waves of data from a panel survey of young women to estimate hazard models for the transition from the parental home to first marriage. Results suggest that freedom from domestic responsibilities is associated with later marriage among coresident women who face the most difficulty in balancing family and career whereas material comforts of the parental home are associated with later marriage among women whose potential husbands have the most tenuous economic prospects.

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cde/cdewp/2004-16.pdf

B. "Economic Independence or Dependence? An Alternative View of the Relationship Between Women's Education and Marriage in Japan," by James M. Raymo and Miho Iwasawa (WP 2004-17, September 2004, .pdf format, 50p.).

Abstract:

Results from cross-national research suggest that increasing economic independence for women contributes to lower rates of marriage only in societies characterized by relatively asymmetric gender division of domestic and market labor. We develop and evaluate an alternative theoretical scenario in which the same results could be explained by changes in marriage market composition and women's continued dependence upon men's economic resources. Using data from four recent surveys, we examine how changes in Japanese marriage rates reflect changes in the general propensity to marry, the likelihood of particular pairings, and composition of the marriage market with respect to age and educational attainment. Construction of counterfactual marriage rates and synthetic cohort marriage trajectories indicates that changes in marriage market composition due to relative improvements in women's educational attainment have contributed to lower rates of marriage among highly educated women and higher rates of marriage among less educated women. Net of this compositional effect, decline in the general propensity to marry among highly educated women has actually been smaller than among high school graduates. Explicit consideration of change in the feasibility of marriage thus results in a fundamentally different theoretical interpretation of decline in the relative risk of marriage for highly educated women.

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cde/cdewp/2004-17.pdf
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Rand Corporation Labor and Population Program:

A. "Are There Gains to Delaying Marriage? The Effect of Age at First Marriage on Career Development and Wages," by David S. Loughran and Julie Zissimopoulos (WR-207, November 2004, .pdf format, 40p.).

Abstract:

Age at first marriage has risen dramatically since the mid-1960s among a wide spectrum of the U.S. population. Researchers have considered many possible explanations for this trend. Few, though, have asked why individuals should want to delay marriage in the first place. One possibility is that early marriage inhibits the career development of one or both individuals in a marriage. This hypothesis is tested using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. Using panel data methods that exploit longitudinal variation in wages and marriage timing, the authors estimate that delaying marriage increases hourly wages of women by nearly four percent for each year they delay. Marriage timing has no impact on the wages of men. They find that delaying marriage may have costs as well. All else equal, women who delay marriage marry spouses with lower wages.

http://www.rand.org/publications/WR/WR207/

Click on "PDF" for full text.

B. "Self-reported Work Disability in the US and The Netherlands," by Arie Kapteyn, James P. Smith, and Arthur van Soest (WR-206, November 2004, .pdf format, 41p.).

Abstract:

Self-reported work disability is analyzed in the US and The Netherlands. The raw data show that Dutch respondents much more often report that they have a work limiting health problem than respondents in the US. The difference remains when controlling for demographic characteristics and observed onsets of health problems. Respondent evaluations of work limitations of hypothetical persons described in vignettes are used to identify the extent to which the differences in self-reports between countries or socio-economic groups are due to systematic variation in the response scales. A model that assumes the same response scales for different health domains is compared with a model that allows for domain specific response scales. Results of both models suggest that about half of the difference between the self-reported rates of work disability in the US and The Netherlands can be explained by response scale differences.

http://www.rand.org/publications/WR/WR206/

Click on "PDF" for full text.
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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research [Rostock, Germany]: "Employment After Childbearing: A Comparative Study of Italy and Norway," by Magdalena Muszynska (WP-2004-030, December 2004, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

In this study we look at the circumstances under which motherhood and employment are compatible. Comparing two countries, Italy and Norway, we analyze the impact of macro factors and individual characteristics on employment decisions of first- and second-time mothers. Our results show that in Norway, where flexible forms of employment are a popular way to reconcile family life and employment, not only many women start to work when their child is small, but the fertility is also relatively high. In Italy, characterized by high rigidities of the labor market and where flexible forms of employment are hardly available, relatively few mothers enter employment and fertility is low. In addition, we found that in both countries better educated women and women with more work experience return to their jobs relatively soon after childbirth. The majority of women with a low level of education and who did not work before the childbirth do not take up work when the child is small.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2004-030.pdf
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Population Council:

A. "Gender differences in time use among adolescents in developing countries: Implications of rising school enrollment rates," by Amanda Ritchie, Cynthia B. Lloyd, and Monica Grant (WP 193, 2004, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

Three research questions are addressed in this paper: (1) How does time use change during the transition to adulthood? (2) Does gender role differentiation intensify during the transition? (3) Does school attendance attenuate gender differences? Researchers at the Population Council have been involved in the collection of 24-hour recall data on time use from adolescents in India, Kenya, Pakistan, and South Africa. Sufficient data have now been collected to permit comparative analysis. These data are supplemented by comparable data from Guatemala and Nicaragua from the World Bank Living Standard Measurement surveys. Our research addresses significant gaps in the literature, in particular the lack of attention to how time use is affected by school attendance. The data document differences in time use patterns between students and non-students. Although female adolescent students still work longer hours than male adolescent students, the gender division of labor that typically develops during adolescence is greatly attenuated among students when time spent at work is measured by combining labor market work with noneconomic household work.

http://www.popcouncil.org/publications/wp/prd/193.html

Click on "Download the full Working Paper in PDF format" at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

B. "The effect of a livelihoods intervention in an urban slum in India: Do vocational counseling and training alter the attitudes and behavior of adolescent girls?" by Barbara S. Mensch, Monica J. Grant, Mary P. Sebastian, Paul C. Hewett, and Dale Huntington (WP 194, 2004, .pdf format, 36p.).

Abstract:

This paper examines whether an experimental intervention for girls aged 14-19 that provided reproductive health information, vocational counseling and training, and assistance with opening savings accounts in slum areas of Allahabad in Uttar Pradesh, India had an effect on their attitudes and behaviors. A quasi-experimental pre- and post-test design was used in which adolescent girls aged 14-19 residing in the intervention-area slums were compared with girls of the same age residing in control-area slums. Although the livelihoods program was acceptable to parents and feasible to implement, the project had only a minimal impact on the behavior and attitudes of adolescent girls in the experimental slums. The greatest changes between the baseline and the endline surveys were found in those outcomes that most closely reflected the content of the intervention. Girls exposed to the intervention were significantly more likely to have knowledge of safe spaces, be a member of a group, score higher on the social skills index, be informed about reproductive health, and spend time on leisure activities than were the matched control respondents. No effect was found on gender-role attitudes, mobility, self-esteem, work expectations, or on number of hours visiting friends, performing domestic chores, or engaging in labor-market work.

http://www.popcouncil.org/publications/wp/prd/194.html

Click on "Download the full Working Paper in PDF format" at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

C. "Does dowry improve life for brides? A test of the bequest theory of dowry in rural Bangladesh," by Luciana Suran, Sajeda Amin, Lopita Huq, and Kobita Chowdury (WP 195, 2004, .pdf format, 21p.).

Abstract:

In recent years, dowry levels have risen to previously unforeseen levels. Among Hindus in north India dowry can amount to three or four times a family's total assets. Among Muslims in Bangladesh and Hindus in south India, dowry has become commonplace whereas the practice did not exist a generation ago. The institution of dowry has been widely criticized, socially maligned, and legally banned. Some recent economic writings suggest that dowry functions as a bequest or pre-mortem inheritance, implying it persists because it is "good for the bride." Using panel data from an adolescent study in rural Bangladesh, this paper explores the association between dowry and the prevalence of domestic abuse to test the bequest theory of dowry. We find that, contrary to the prediction of the bequest theory, married females who paid dowry at marriage have a higher likelihood of reporting domestic violence compared to those who did not. In addition, the relation between dowry and abuse is highly level-specific: respondents who paid small dowries report much higher levels of abuse than those who paid large dowries. In fact, paying no dowry is just as protective, if not more so, in terms of preventing abuse as the largest dowry payments.

http://www.popcouncil.org/publications/wp/prd/195.html

Click on "Download the full Working Paper in PDF format" at the bottom of the abstract for full text.
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National Bureau of Economic Research:

A. "Finance, Inequality, and Poverty: Cross-Country Evidence," by Thorsten Beck, Asli Demirgu-Kunt, and Ross Levine (w10979, December 2004, .pdf format 45p.).

Abstract:

While substantial research finds that financial development boosts overall economic growth, we study whether financial development disproportionately raises the incomes of the poor and alleviates poverty. Using a broad cross-country sample, we distinguish among competing theoretical predictions about the impact of financial development on changes in income distribution and poverty alleviation. We find that financial development reduces income inequality by disproportionately boosting the incomes of the poor. Countries with better-developed financial intermediaries experience faster declines in measures of both poverty and income inequality. These results are robust to controlling for other country characteristics and potential reverse causality.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w10979

Click on PDF or submit your email address for full text.

B. "Why Should We Care About Child Labor? The Education, Labor Market, and Health Consequences of Child Labor," by Kathleen Beegle, Rajeev Dehejia, and Roberta Gatti (w10980, December 2004, .pdf format, 52p.).

Abstract:

Although there is an extensive literature on the determinants of child labor and many initiatives aimed at combating it, there is limited evidence on the consequences of child labor on socio-economic outcomes such as education, wages, and health. We evaluate the causal effect of child labor participation on these outcomes using panel data from Vietnam and an instrumental variables strategy. Five years subsequent to the child labor experience, we find significant negative impacts on school participation and educational attainment, but also find substantially higher earnings for those (young) adults who worked as children. We find no significant effects on health. Over a longer horizon, we estimate that from age 30 onward the forgone earnings attributable to lost schooling exceed any earnings gain associated with child labor and that the net present discounted value of child labor is positive for discount rates of 11.5 percent or higher. We show that child labor is prevalent among households likely to have higher borrowing costs, that are farther from schools, and whose adult members experienced negative returns to their own education. This evidence suggests that reducing child labor will require facilitating access to credit and will also require households to be forward looking.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w10980

Click on PDF or submit your email address for full text.

C. "The Gift of the Dying: The Tragedy of AIDS and the Welfare of Future African Generations," by Alwyn Young (w10991, December 2004, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

This paper simulates the impact of the AIDS epidemic on future living standards in South Africa. I emphasize two competing effects. On the one hand, the epidemic is likely to have a detrimental impact on the human capital accumulation of orphaned children. On the other hand, widespread community infection lowers fertility, both directly, through a reduction in the willingness to engage in unprotected sexual activity, and indirectly, by increasing the scarcity of labour and the value of a woman's time. I find that even with the most pessimistic assumptions concerning reductions in educational attainment, the fertility effect dominates. The AIDS epidemic, on net, enhances the future per capita consumption possibilities of the South African economy.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w10991

Click on PDF or submit your email address for full text.

D. "Fluctuations in a Dreadful Childhood: Synthetic Longitudinal Height Data, Relative Prices and Weather in the Short-Term Health of American Slaves," by Richard H. Steckel (w10993, December 2004, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

For over a quarter century anthropometric historians have struggled to identify and measure the numerous factors that affect adult stature, which depends upon diet, disease and physical activity from conception to maturity. I simplify this complex problem by assessing nutritional status in a particular year using synthetic longitudinal data created from measurements of children born in the same year but measured at adjacent ages, which are abundantly available from 28,000 slave manifests housed at the National Archives. I link this evidence with annual measures of economic conditions and new measures of the disease environment to test hypotheses of slave owner behavior. Height-by-age profiles furnish clear evidence that owners substantially managed slave health. The short-term evidence shows that weather affected growth via exposure to pathogens and that owners modified net nutrition in response to sustained price signals.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w10993

Click on PDF or submit your email address for full text.

E. "Macroeconomic Conditions, Health and Mortality," by Christopher J. Ruhm (w11007, December 2004, .pdf format, 17p.).

Abstract:

Although health is conventionally believed to deteriorate during macroeconomic downturns, the empirical evidence supporting this view is quite weak and comes from studies containing methodological shortcomings that are difficult to remedy. Recent research that better controls for many sources of omitted variables bias instead suggests that mortality decreases and physical health improves when the economy temporarily weakens. This partially reflects reductions in external sources of death, such as traffic fatalities and other accidents, but changes in lifestyles and health behaviors are also likely to play a role. This paper summarizes our current understanding of how health is affected by macroeconomic fluctuations and describes potential mechanisms for the effects.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11007

Click on PDF or submit your email address for full text.

F. "Using Hit Rate Tests to Test for Racial Bias in Law Enforcement: Vehicle Searches in Wichita," by Nicola Persico and Petra Todd (w10947, December 2004, .pdf format, 32p.).

Abstract:

This paper considers the use of outcomes-based tests for detecting racial bias in the context of police searches of motor vehicles. It shows that the test proposed in Knowles, Persico and Todd (2001) can also be applied in a more general environment where police officers are heterogenous in their tastes for discrimination and in their costs of search and motorists are heterogeneous in their benefits and costs from criminal behavior. We characterize the police and motorist decision problems in a game theoretic framework and establish properties of the equilibrium. We also extend the model to the case where drivers' characteristics are mutable in the sense that drivers can adapt some of their characteristics to reduce the probability of being monitored. After developing the theory that justifies the application of outcomes-based tests, we apply the tests to data on police searches of motor vehicles gathered by the Wichita Police department. The empirical findings are consistent with the notion that police in Wichita choose their search strategies to maximize successful searches, and not out of racial bias.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10947

Click on PDF or submit your email address for full text.

G. "Individual Behaviors and Substance Use: The Role of Price," by Michael Grossman (w10948, December 2004, .pdf format, 59p.).

Abstract:

I discuss economic approaches to the demand for harmfully addictive substances and estimate time-series demand functions for the period from 1975 through 2003. My estimates suggest that changes in price can explain a good deal of the observed changes in cigarette smoking, binge alcohol drinking, and marijuana use by high school seniors. For example, the 70 percent increase in the real price of cigarettes since 1997 due to the Medicaid Master Settlement Agreement explains almost all of the 12 percentage point reduction in the cigarette smoking participation rate since that year. The 7 percent increase in the real price of beer between 1990 and 1992 due to the Federal excise tax hike on that beverage in 1991 accounts for almost 90 percent of the 4 percentage point decline in binge drinking in the period at issue. The wide swings in the real price of marijuana explain 70 percent of the reduction in participation from 1975 to 1992, 60 percent of the subsequent growth to 1997, and almost 60 percent of the decline since that year. I conclude with implications for tax policy and for the lively and contentious debate concerning the legalization of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10948

Click on PDF or submit your email address for full text.

H. "An Investigation of the Effects of Alcohol Policies on Youth STDs," by Michael Grossman, Robert Kaestner, and Sara Markowitz (w10949, December 2004, .pdf format, 32p.).

Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of alcohol policies in reducing the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases among youth. Previous research has shown that risky sexual practices (e.g., unprotected sex and multiple partners) that increase the risk of contracting a STD are highly correlated with alcohol use. If alcohol is a cause of risky sexual behavior, then policies that reduce the consumption of alcohol may also reduce the incidence of STDs. In this paper, we examine the relationship between alcohol policies (e.g., beer taxes and statutes pertaining to alcohol sales and drunk driving) and rates of gonorrhea and AIDS among teenagers and young adults. Results indicate that higher beer taxes are associated with lower rates of gonorrhea for males and are suggestive of lower AIDS rates. Strict drunk driving policies in the form of zero tolerance laws may also lower the gonorrhea rate among males under the legal drinking age.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10949
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Washington University at St. Louis Economics Working Paper Archive: "Immigrant Health--Selectivity and Acculturation," by Guillermina Jasso, Douglas S. Massey, Mark R. Rosenzweig, and James P. Smith (2004, .pdf format, 47p.).

Abstract:

This paper explores some salient issues concerning immigrant health. Ethnic health disparities are inherently linked to immigration since ethnic identities often are traced to the country of origin of one's immigrant ancestors. Two of the central questions that have dominated the medical and social science literature on immigrant health are the central focus of this paper. These issues involve the magnitude and mechanisms shaping health selectivity and the determinants of health trajectories following immigration. As part of this paper, we also developed a theoretical model that attempts to explain the diversity in health selection among immigrants.

http://econwpa.wustl.edu/eps/lab/papers/0412/0412002.pdf
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Medical Expenditure Panel Survey:

A. "Trends in Provider Capitation, 1996-2000," by Samuel Zuvekas and Joel W. Cohen (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, December 2004, .pdf format, 20p.).

Abstract:

Objective: We examine the extent to which the health care services delivered by physicians and hospitals in public and private health plans are capitated, and how this changed from 1996 to 2000.

Study Design: The data are drawn from the 1996 to 2000 years of the nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Information on whether health care use was covered by capitated arrangements was obtained from billing offices of physicians and hospitals, in a follow-back survey of providers used by MEPS household members.

Methods: We compare changes from 1996 to 2000 in the percentage of office-based physician visits, hospital outpatient department (OPD) visits, hospital emergency department (ED) visits, and hospital inpatient stays that are covered by capitation arrangements. We also compare differences by health insurance coverage, including HMO coverage, and selected sociodemographic characteristics. We use standard two-tail tests of significance, which are calculated taking into account the complex survey design of the MEPS.

Results: We find that only 15 percent of visits to office-based physicians were capitated in 1996, declining to 13 percent in 2000. Even among HMO enrollees, visits covered by a provider capitation arrangement represented a minority of all office visits, declining to 25 percent for Private HMO enrollees and 15 percent for Medicaid HMO enrollees in 2000. Even smaller proportions of hospital services were capitated.

Conclusions: Capitation remains relatively rare even among public and private HMO enrollees.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=650

Link to full text is at the bottom of the abstract.

B. "Covering the Uninsured: Estimates of the Impact on Total Health Expenditures for 2002," by Edward Miller, Jessica S. Banthin, and John F. Moeller (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, December 2004, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

This study estimates the change in national health expenditures that would result if all uninsured persons in the non-elderly population were given health insurance coverage. Our analysis assumes that, after adjusting for individual characteristics, the uninsured, when given coverage, would spend the same for health care as the previously insured. We find that expanding public coverage would have cost $38.1 to $41.3 billion in 2002, while expanding private coverage would have cost $53.8 to $67.4 billion. These estimates are adjusted for uncompensated care and administrative costs. Public coverage is less costly than private coverage because of lower provider reimbursement rates.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=649
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London School of Economics Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion:

A. "Poverty and Inequality and Social Policy in China," by Bingqin Li and David Piachaud (CASEpaper 87, November 2004, .pdf format, 46p.).

Abstract:

Despite prolonged economic growth, poverty has become a more notable and noted feature of Chinese society. The paper examines three phases of development since the foundation of the People's Republic: the central planning era (1949 -1978); the pro-urban growth model (1978 - 1999); and more recent changes (1999 - 2004). For each phase the nature of the economic and social policies are described and the effects on poverty and inequality are examined. The limitations of a social policy that is subservient to the economic strategy are considered. The alternative of a model of social development based on the livelihood approach is analysed and its potential to reduce poverty and inequality are considered.

http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/dps/case/cp/CASEpaper87.pdf

B. "Social Mobility, Life Chances, and the Early Years," by Jane Waldfogel (CASEpaper 88, November 2004, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract:

It is widely agreed that the early years are a particularly important time for efforts to increase social mobility, because a good deal of inequality is already apparent by the time children start school, and because children's development may be less amenable to change after they enter school. But it is less clear how much policies can reduce inequality in the early years, or what policies might be most effective, given the multiple influences on development in the early years and given the complex effects of policies. In this paper, I review what we know from research about what affects development in the early years and examine the current UK policy framework in light of that research. I then make recommendations for priorities for next steps to improve social mobility and other desired outcomes in the early years and thereafter. We know a good deal from research about what quality means, and about what types of experiences are best for children. The research points to some clear next steps in early years policy. These include: extending paid parental leave to 12 months; offering a more flexible package of supports to families with children under the age of 2 or 3; providing high-quality centre-based care to 2 year olds, starting with the most disadvantaged; and providing a more integrated system of high-quality care and education for 3 to 5 year olds.

http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/dps/case/cp/CASEpaper88.pdf
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Bank of England [London]: "From tiny samples do mighty populations grow? Using the British Household Panel Survey to analyse the household sector balance sheet," by Victoria Redwood and Merxe Tudela (WP 239, November 2004, .pdf format, 40p.).

Abstract:

This paper evaluates the reliability of specific variables in the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) by comparing grossed-up variables from the BHPS with their corresponding national aggregates. The paper focuses on those variables that provide the most information on risks to financial stability stemming from households, particularly household balance sheet variables relating to debt and assets, and income. The results indicate that housing wealth and income derived from the BHPS are broadly consistent with the aggregate measures. But unsecured debt and financial wealth are substantially under-recorded in the BHPS relative to the aggregate benchmark.

http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/workingpapers/wp239.pdf
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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany:

A. "Sorting, Selection, and Transformation of the Return to College Education in China," by Belton M. Fleisher, Haizheng Li, Shi Li, and Xiaojun Wang (Discussion Paper 1446, December 2004, .pdf format, 31.p).

Abstract:

We estimate selection and sorting effects on the evolution of the private return to schooling for college graduates during China's between 1988 and 2002. We pay special attention to the changing role of sorting by ability versus budget-constraint effects as China's education policy has changed from one in which the bulk of direct costs are paid by government for students who pass a rigid set of test to one in which freedom of choice is increasingly the rule for those who can afford to pay for tuition and living expenses while acquiring higher education. We find evidence of substantial sorting gains under the traditional system but that gains have diminished and even become negative as schooling choices widened and participation has become subject to increasing direct private costs. We take this as evidence consistent with the influence of financial constraints on decisions to attend college.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1446.pdf

B. "Impact of Income Growth and Economic Reform on Nutrition Intake in Urban China: 1986-2000," by Xin Meng, Xiaodong Gong, and Youjuan Wang (Discussion Paper 1448, December 2004, .pdf format, 33p.).

Abstract:

Although urban China has experienced a rapid income growth over the last twenty years, nutrition intake for the low income group declined in the 1990s. Does this imply a zero or negative income elasticity for the low income group? This paper examines this issue using large representative sample of repeated cross-sectional data for the period 1986-2000. It is found that income elasticities of calorie consumption for urban households are far from zero, and the lower the income level the higher the income elasticity. The main reason for the reduction in calorie consumption for the low income group in the early 1990s was a sharp increase in food price. In addition, in the mid to late 1990s large scale social welfare reform increased households' need to pay for education, medical, housing expenses and the need to save for future consumption and income uncertainty. These factors seem to have played an important role in suppressing nutrition consumption of the low income group during this period.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1448.pdf

C. "Comparing Apples with Oranges: Revisiting the Gender Wage Gap in an International Perspective," by Robert Plasman and Salimata Sissoko (Discussion Paper 1449, December 2004, .pdf format, 35p.).

Abstract:

Using a rich and comparable micro-data set, we analyse international differences in gender pay gaps in the private sector for a sample of five European economies: Belgium, Denmark, Ireland, Italy and Spain. Using different methods, we examine how wage structure, differences in the distribution of measured characteristics, occupational and industrial segregation contribute to explain the pattern of international differences. Furthermore, we take into account indirect discrimination influencing female occupational and industrial distributions. We find significant impacts of those latter factors on gender differentials. However, the magnitude of their effects varies across countries.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1449.pdf
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Institute for Social And Economic Research (ISER) [University of Essex, Colchester, UK]: "Patterns of Consent: evidence from a General Household Survey," by Stephen P. Jenkins, Lorenzo Cappellari, Peter Lynn, Annette Jackle, and Emanuela Sala (WP 2004-27, December 2004, .pdf format, 35p.).

Abstract:

We analyse consent patterns and consent bias in the context of a large general household survey, the "Improving survey measurement of income and employment" (ISMIE) survey, also addressing issues that arise when there are multiple consent questions. Using a multivariate probit regression model for four binary outcomes with two incidental truncations, we show that there are biases in consent to data linkage with benefit and tax credit administrative records held by the Department for Work and Pensions, and with wage and employment data held by employers, and also in respondents' willingness and ability to supply their National Insurance Number. The biases differ according to the question considered, however. We also show that modelling consent questions independently rather than jointly may lead to misleading inferences about consent bias. A positive correlation between unobservable individual factors affecting consent to DWP record linkage and consent to employer record linkage is suggestive of a latent individual consent propensity.

http://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/pubs/workpaps/pdf/2004-27.pdf
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Mannheim [Germany] Research Institute for the Economics of Aging (MEA): "Stochastic Population Projection for Germany-Based on the Quadratic Spline Approach to Modelling Age Specific Fertility Rates," by Oliver Lipps and Frank Betz (Discussion Paper 59, September 2004, .pdf format, 18p.).

Abstract:

This contribution builds upon a former paper by the authors (Lipps and Betz 2004), in which a stochastic population projection for East- and West Germany is performed. Aim was to forecast relevant population parameters and their distribution in a consistent way. We now present some modifications, which have been modelled since. First, population parameters for the entire German population are modelled. In order to overcome the modelling problem of the structural break in the East during reunification, we show that the adaptation process of the relevant figures by the East can be considered to be completed by now. As a consequence, German parameters can be modelled just by using the West German historic patterns, with the start-off population of entire Germany. Second, a new model to simulate age specific fertility rates is presented, based on a quadratic spline approach. This offers a higher flexibility to model various age specific fertility curves. The simulation results are compared with the scenario based official forecasts for Germany in 2050. Exemplary for some population parameters (e.g. dependency ratio), it can be shown that the range spanned by the medium and extreme variants correspond to the s -intervals in the stochastic framework. It seems therefore more appropriate to treat this range as a s-interval covering about two thirds of the true distribution.

http://www.mea.uni-mannheim.de/mea_neu/pages/files/nopage_pubs/r4hj0py8bekvyq07_dp59.pdf
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Institutionen for Nationalekonomi (Umea University) [Sweden]: "Children's School Achievement and Parental Work: an analysis for Sweden," by Magdalena Norberg-Schonfeldt (Umea Economic Studies No. 645, December 2004, uncompressed and compressed [.zip] .pdf and PostScript format, 25p.).

Abstract:

In this paper, data from Statistics Sweden about students entering upper secondary school (10th grade) in 1994 and graduating in 1996 or 1997, along with socioeconomic characteristics from the 1990 census, are used to explore the relationship between the market work by mothers and fathers in Sweden and their children's educational achievement, measured as Grade Point Average. The results show, in line with previous research, that there is a positive relationship between parental income and child GPA. When it comes to the number of hours of work that the parents perform in the labour market, the results differ between mothers and fathers. If the mother works less then full time, preferably even less then halftime, it has positive effects on the child's grades. There are no significant effects of the father's hours of work, as long as he works a positive amount of time. The lack of effects from the father's hours of work may, however, be due to lack of variation in data.

http://www.econ.umu.se/ues/ues645.html

Click on any of the links at the bottom of the page for full text.

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "advanced search"
C. Type in your publication name and click "Exact title" radio button
D. Under "Show", click the "fax/ariel" radio button.
E. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

Demography (Vol. 41, No. 4, 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

Economic Development and Cultural Change (Vol. 53, No. 1, 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite database. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

International Labour Review (Vol. 143, No. 3, 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

Milbank Quarterly (Vol. 82, No. 4, 2004).
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Other Journals

AIDS (Vol. 18, No, 18, Dec. 3, 2004; Vol. 19, No. 1, Jan. 3, 2005).

http://www.aidsonline.com/pt/re/aids/issuelist.htm

American Journal of Epidemiology (Vol. 161, No. 1, Jan. 1, 2005).

http://aje.oupjournals.org/content/vol161/issue1/index.dtl?etoc

American Journal of Public Health (Vol. 95, No. 1, January 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite database. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

http://www.ajph.org/content/vol95/issue1/?etoc

European Journal of Population (Vol. 20, No. 3, 2004).

http://www.kluweronline.com/issn/0168-6577/contents

Journal of the American Statistical Association (Vol. 99, No. 468, 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://juno.asa.catchword.org/vl=2557073/cl=53/nw=1/rpsv/cw/vhosts/asa/01621459/contp1.htm

Work and Occupations (Vol. 32, No. 1, February 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://wox.sagepub.com/content/vol32/issue1/?etoc

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=========================================================================

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

Kaiser Family Foundation: "Barbara Jordan Health Policy Scholars Program." "The Scholars Program brings talented Latino, African American, Asian/Pacific Islander and American Indian/Alaska Native college seniors and recent graduates to Washington, DC, where they work in congressional offices and learn about health policy. Through the nine-week program (May 24 - July 29, 2005), Scholars gain knowledge about federal legislative procedure and health policy issues, while further developing their critical thinking and leadership skills. In addition to an internship in a congressional office, Scholars participate in seminars and site visits to augment their knowledge of health care issues, and write and present a health policy research memo. The program is based at Howard University." For more information, including application information, see:

http://www.kff.org/about/jordanscholars.cfm
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National Institutes of Health: "Men's Heterosexual Behavior and HIV Infection" (PA-05-033, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Dec. 21, 2004). For more information see:

http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-05-033.html
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National Science Foundation: "Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) Competition" (nsf05541, Jan. 3, 2005, HTML and ASCII text format). For more information see:

http://www.nsf.gov/pubsys/ods/getpub.cfm?nsf05541

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DATA:

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive: ICPSR SAMHDA at the University of Michigan has released the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2003 in Data Analysis System (DAS) web extraction format. SAMHDA notes that the archival version of this dataset (ASCII data file; SAS, SPSS and Stata set-up files; and the PDF codebook) should be available shortly.

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/cgi-bin/SDA13/hsda?samhda+04138-0001
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Monitoring the Future Data Tables:

A. "Overall teen drug use continues gradual decline; but use of inhalants rises," by L.D. Johnson, P.M O'Malley, J.G. Bachman, and J.E. Schulenberg (Dec. 21, 2004, .pdf format, 58p.).

http://monitoringthefuture.org/pressreleases/04drugpr_complete.pdf

B. "Cigarette smoking among American teens continues to decline, but more slowly than in the past," by L.D. Johnson, P.M O'Malley, J.G. Bachman, and J.E. Schulenberg (Dec. 21, 2004, .pdf format, 19p.)

http://monitoringthefuture.org/pressreleases/04cigpr_complete.pdf
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Luxembourg Income Study: LIS has announced that new data is available for Mexico 2002. Descriptives are in Microsoft Excel format, with survey information in .pdf format. For more information see:

http://www.lisproject.org/techdoc/mx/mxindex.htm

LIS database access:

http://www.lisproject.org/dataccess.htm
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Medical Expenditure Panel Survey:

A. "New Compendium tables from the MEPS Household Component - Medical Expenditures by Condition tables for year 2002." (Agency for Healtcare Research and Quality).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/CompendiumTables/TC_TOC.HTM

B. "MEPSnet/Household Component - 2002 data now available." This data is available via the MEPSnet interactive web extraction tool. (Agency for Healtcare Research and Quality).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/MEPSNet/HC/MEPSnetHC.asp

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu