Current Demographic Research Report #57, November 8, 2004.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

========================================================================

Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Report, Facts for Features
Centers for Disease Control Periodical Article
DHHS SAMHSA Reports
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistical Brief
Government Accountability Office Report
National Center for Education Statistics Report, Brief
Bureau of Justice Statistics Report
National Institute of Justice Research Brief
Bureau of Labor Statistics Announcement, Slideshow, Summary
National Institute of Justice Research Brief
US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Article
United Nations Population Division Report
UNESCAP Periodical
Urban Institute Reports
Kaiser Family Foundation Report
Milbank Memorial Fund Report
Info Health Pop. Reporter
PSID Child Development Study Bibliography Updates
NLS Bibliography Updates

WORKING PAPERS

Princeton University Office of Population Research
University of Washington Center for the Study of Demography and Ecology
National Bureau of Economic Research
Population Council
World Bank Development Programme
Econometric Society 2004 Far Eastern Meetings
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER)
Stockholm School of Economics European Institute of Japanese Studies
University of Potsdam WSFVD
Centro di Economia Del Lavoro e di Politica Economica

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Other Journals

CONFERENCES

Federation of Canadian Demographers Call for Papers

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

American Educational Research Association Call For Applications
Kaiser Family Foundation Barbara Jordan Health Policy Scholars Program

LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES

House Education and the Workforce Committee
Senate Committee on Indian Affairs

DATA

World Health Organization

=========================================================================

REPORTS, ARTICLES, NEWS RELEASES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Report, Facts for Features:

A. "Accuracy and Coverage Evaluation of Census 2000: Design and Methodology" (DSSD/03-DM, September 2004, .pdf format, 202p.).

http://www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/dssd03-dm.pdf

B. "Veterans Day 2004: Nov. 11" (Facts for Features CB04-FF.18-2, Nov. 8, 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

HTML:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/002827.html

.pdf:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2004/cb04ff18-2.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Centers for Disease Control Periodical Article: "Blood Mercury Levels in Young Children and Childbearing-Aged Women --- United States, 1999--2002" (_Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_, Vol. 54, No. 43, Nov. 5, 2004, HTML and .pdf format, p. 1018-1020).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5343a5.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5343.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Reports:

A. "Gender Differences in Substance Dependence and Abuse" (National Survey on Drug Use & Health, October 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k4/genderDependence/genderDependence.cfm

B. "National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS): 2003" (Data on Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities, DASIS Series: S-24, 2004).

http://wwwdasis.samhsa.gov/03nssats/index.htm

C. "Female Youths and Delinquent Behaviors" (National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) Report, November 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k4/girlDelinquents/girlDelinquents.cfm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistical Brief: "The Long-Term Uninsured in America, 2000 to 2001: Estimates for the U.S. Population under Age 65," by Jeffrey A. Rhoades (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, MEPS Statistical Brief #57, November 2004, .pdf format, 5p.).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=640
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Government Accountability Office Report: "American Community Survey: Key Unresolved Issues" (GAO-05-82, October 2004, .pdf format, 114p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d0582.pdf

Note: This is a temporary address. GAO reports are always available at:

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gaoreports/index.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Center for Education Statistics Report, Brief:

A. "Dropout Rates in the United States: 2001," by Phillip Kaufman, Martha Alt, and Chris Chapman (NCES 2005046, October 2004, .pdf format, 78p.).

Abstract:

This report is the latest in a series of National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) reports on high school dropout and completion rates that began in 1988. It presents estimates of rates in 2001, and includes time series data on high school dropout and completion rates for the period 1972 through 2001. In addition to extending time series data reported in earlier years, the report examines the characteristics of high school dropouts and high school completers in 2001. It shows that while progress was made during the 1970s and 1980s in reducing high school dropout rates and increasing high school completion rates, these rates have since stagnated.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005046

B. "Educational Attainment of High School Dropouts 8 Years Later," by David Hurst, Dana Kelly, and Daniel Princiotta (NCES 2005026, November 2004, .pdf format, 3p.).

Abstract:

This issue brief examines the educational outcomes of students who were ever classified as high school dropouts by 8 years after when most of their 1988 cohort of 8th graders would have completed high school. Some students who drop out return a short time later to earn a diploma, some may pursue an alternative credential such as a General Educational Development (GED) certificate, and others may enroll in a postsecondary institution without having earned a high school credential. Using data on public and private school students from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88), examines the educational attainment of the 21 percent of 1988 eighth-graders who had dropped out of high school at least once since eighth grade.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005026
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bureau of Justice Statistics Report: "Prisoners in 2003," by Paige M. Harrison and Allen J. Beck (NCJ 205335, November 2004, ASCII text and .pdf format, 12p., with .zip compressed spreadsheets).

Abstract:

Reports the number of persons in State and Federal prisons at year end, compares the increase in the prison population during 2003 with that of the previous year, and gives the prison growth rates since 1995. The report also provides the number of male and female prisoners on December 31, 2003. It includes incarceration rates for the States and the 5 highest and 5 lowest jurisdictions for selected characteristics, such as the growth rate, number of prisoners held, and incarceration rates. Tables present data on prison capacities and the use of local jails and privately operated prisons. Estimates are provided on the number of sentenced prisoners by gender, race, and Hispanic origin.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/p03.htm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Institute of Justice Research Brief: "Violence Against Women: Identifying Risk Factors" (November 2004, .pdf format, 10p.). "This NIJ Research in Brief addresses whether sexual and physical abuse in childhood and adolescence are risk factors for becoming a victim of violence against women as an adult."

http://www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/nij/197019.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bureau of Labor Statistics Announcement, Slideshow, Summary:

A. "Discontinuation of Women Workers Employment Series" (Nov. 5, 2004).

http://www.bls.gov/ces/cesww.htm

B. "Current Employment Statistics Highlights" (November, 2004, .pdf format, 11p.).

http://www.bls.gov/ces/ceshighlights.pdf

C. "Employment from the BLS household and payroll surveys: summary of recent trends" (November 2004, .pdf format, 13p.).

http://www.bls.gov/cps/ces_cps_trends.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Article: "Low-Skill Jobs: A Shrinking Share of the Rural Economy," by Robert Gibbs, Lorin Kusmin, and John Cromartie (_Amber Waves_, November 2004, HTML and .pdf format, p. 38-44).

http://www.ers.usda.gov/AmberWaves/november04/Features/lowskilljobs.htm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

United Nations Population Division Report: "Review and Appraisal of the Progress Made in Achieving the Goals and Objectives of the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development: the 2004 Report" (United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, 2004, .pdf format, 49p.).

http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/reviewappraisal/English.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Periodical: "Population Headliners" (No. 301, July/August 2004, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.unescap.org/publications/detail.asp?id=1002
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Urban Institute Reports:

A. "From Prison to Work: The Employment Dimensions of Prisoner Reentry," by Amy L. Solomon, Kelly Dedel Johnson, Jeremy Travis, and Elizabeth Cincotta McBride (October 2004, .pdf format, 32p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411097

B. "State Profile of California: Data from the 2002 National Survey of America's Families," by Adam Safir (Nov. 4, 2004, .pdf format, 55p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=900753
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kaiser Family Foundation Report: "Hearing Their Voices: Lessons from the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act (BCCPTA)," by Kyle A. Kenney, Sarah C. Blake, Kathleen Maloy, Usha R. Ranji, and Alina Salganicoff (Fall 2004, .pdf format, 25p.). "In 2000, Congress passed a landmark law that gave states the option of extending Medicaid coverage to certain low-income women with breast or cervical cancer. In California, approximately 10,000 women have been assisted by this program. This policy brief reports on the impact of this program on low-income women in California, using focus group analysis."

http://www.kff.org/womenshealth/7146.cfm

Click on "Report" for full text.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Milbank Memorial Fund Report: "Using Health Research in Policy and Practice: Case Studies from Nine Countries," by Ray Moynihan (October 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 40p.).

http://www.milbank.org/reports/0409Moynihan/0409Moynihan.html

Click on "To print this report click here for the pdf version" under the title for .pdf version.

More about Milbank Memorial Fund:

http://www.milbank.org/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (Vol. 4, No. 45, Nov. 8, 2004). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Panel Study of Income Dynamics/Child Development Study Bibliography Updates: PSID/CDS at the Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, has recently updated its bibliography. The entire bibliography can be found at:

http://psidonline.isr.umich.edu/Publications/Bibliography/BrowseKeywordsQ.aspx?ID=5

New items include:

Conley, Dalton and Yeung, Wei-Jun J. Black-White Differences in Occupational Prestige: Their Impact on Child Development. American Behavioral Scientist. Forthcoming.

Gould, Elise. Decomposing the Effects of Children's Health on Mother's Labor Supply: Is It Time or Money?. Health Economics. 2004; 13(June):525-541.

Gould, Elise. Essays on Health, Work, Poverty, and Income Inequality. Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin-Madison; 2004, 125 pp.

Pritchett, Laura McCallister. Childhood Effects of Low Birth Weight: Johns Hopkins University; 2004, 266 pp.

Yeung, Wei-Jun J. and Glauber, R. Time Use for Children in Low-Income Families. Crane, R. and Marshall, E., eds. Handbook of Families and Poverty: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. : Sage Publication; Forthcoming
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

NLS Bibliography Updates: Note: These citations, along with all of the NLS bibliography, can be found at:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/

Note: Where available, direct links to full text have been provided. These references represent updated citations from Oct. 18 - Nov 5, 2004.

STERN, DAVID
SONG, YINQUONG
O'BRIEN, BRIDGET
Company training in the United States 1970-2000: what have been the trends over time?
International Journal of Training and Development 8, 3 (2004): 191-209
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
ID Number: 4759
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc.

GRAWE, NATHAN D.
Intergenerational Mobility for Whom? The Experience of High and Low Earnings Sons in International Perspective
In: Generational Income Mobility in North America and Europe, M. Corak, ed.,
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4760
Publisher: Cambridge University Press

MOUW, TED
Sequences of Early Adult Transitions: How Variable are They, and Does it Matter?
In: On the Frontier of Adulthood: Theory, Research, and Public Policy, R. A.
Settersten, Jr., F. F. Furstenberg, Jr., and R. G. Rumbaut, eds., Chicago:
University of Chicago Press, 2004
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4761
Publisher: University of Chicago Press

Return to top

=========================================================================

WORKING PAPERS:

Princeton University Office of Population Research: "Do Biomarkers of Stress Mediate the Relationship between Socioeconomic Status and Health?" by Jennifer Beam Dowd and Noreen Goldman (WP 2004-06, 2004, .pdf format, 23p.).

http://opr.princeton.edu/papers/opr0406.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

University of Washington Center for the Study of Demography and Ecology: "Teenage Expectations and Desires about Family Formation in the United States," by Robert D. Plotnick (Working Paper 04-11, 2004, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

Using data collected in 2000 on a racially and ethnically diverse sample of high school seniors, this study analyzes teenagers' expectations and desires about marriage, having children, and becoming unwed parents. The study is the first to examine all six outcomes with a common conceptual framework and data set. The conceptual framework combines family context, opportunity cost, and social-psychological perspectives. All perspectives receive empirical support. Race, ethnicity, gender, type of religious upbringing, parental education, and parental expectations for their child~Rs education are aspects of family context that consistently show significant relationships with expectations and desires. Adolescents with higher opportunity costs--as indicated by having better grades and higher expectations and aspirations for their schooling--expect and desire to marry and have children at older ages. This finding should be regarded cautiously because there is reason to think that opportunity costs and the outcomes are jointly determined. There is modest empirical support for the social-psychological element of the framework. The study investigates several explanatory variables not considered in previous research and finds some to be important predictors of expectations and desires about family formation.

http://csde.washington.edu/downloads/04-11.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Bureau of Economic Research:

A. "From Home to Hospital: The Evolution of Childbirth in the United States," by Melissa A. Thomasson and Jaret Treber (w10873, November 2004, .pdf format, 40p.).

Abstract:

This paper examines the shift in childbirth from home to hospital that occurred in the United States in the early twentieth century. Using a panel of city-level data over the period 1927-1940, we examine the shift of childbirth from home to hospital and analyze the impact of medical care on maternal mortality. Results suggest that increased operative intervention on the part of physicians and a resultant greater risk of infection increased maternal mortality prior to the introduction of sulfa drugs in 1937. However, the introduction of sulfa enabled doctors to reduce maternal mortality by enabling them to do potentially life-saving procedures (such as cesareans) without the risk of subsequent infection. Regressions estimated separately by race suggest that the impact of medical care on maternal mortality differed for blacks and whites. Relative to whites, hospitals posed a greater risk for black mothers prior to the availability of sulfa drugs in 1937, and were less beneficial for them afterwards, suggesting that blacks may have received lower quality medical care.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10873

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address for full text.

B. "Educational Opportunity," by Paul Willen, Igal Hendel, and Joel Shapiro (w10879, November 2004, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

Affordable higher education is, and has been, a key element of social policy in the United States with broad bipartisan support. Financial aid has substantially increased the number of people who complete university - generally thought to be a good thing. We show, however, that making education more affordable can increase income inequality. The mechanism that drives our results is a combination of credit constraints and the `signaling' role of education first explored by Spence (1973). When borrowing for education is difficult, lack of a college education could mean that one is either of low ability or of high ability but with low financial resources. When government programs make borrowing or lower tuition more affordable, high-ability persons become educated and leave the uneducated pool, driving down the wage for unskilled workers and raising the skill premium.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10879

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address for full text.

C. "Tiebout Sorting, Social Multipliers and the Demand for School Quality," by Patrick Bayer, Fernando Ferreira, and Robert McMillan (w10871, November 2004, .pdf format, 57p.).

Abstract:

In many theoretical public finance models, school quality plays a central role as a determinant of household location choices and in turn, of neighborhood stratification. In contrast, the recent empirical literature has almost universally concluded that the direct effect of school quality on housing demand is weak, a conclusion that is robust across a variety of research designs. Using an equilibrium model of residential sorting, this paper closes the gap between these literatures, providing clear evidence that the full effect of school quality on residential sorting is significantly larger than the direct effect--four times as great for education stratification, twice for income stratification. This is due to a strong social multiplier associated with heterogeneous preferences for peers and neighbors; initial changes in school quality set in motion a process of re-sorting on the basis of neighborhood characteristics that reinforces itself, giving rise to substantially larger stratification effects.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10871

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address for full text.

D. "An Equilibrium Model of Sorting in an Urban Housing Market," by Patrick Bayer, Robert McMillan, and Kim Rueben (w10865, November 2004, .pdf format, 55p.).

Abstract:

This paper introduces an equilibrium framework for analyzing residential sorting, designed to take advantage of newly available restricted-access Census microdata. The framework adds an equilibrium concept to the discrete choice framework developed by McFadden (1973, 1978), permitting a more flexible characterization of preferences than has been possible in previously estimated sorting models. Using data on nearly a quarter of a million households residing in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1990, our estimates provide a precise characterization of preferences for many housing and neighborhood attributes, showing how demand for these attributes varies with a household's income, race, education, and family structure. We use the equilibrium model in combination with these estimates to explore the effects of an increase in income inequality, the findings indicating that much of the increased spending power of the rich is absorbed by higher housing prices.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10865

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address for full text.

E. "Autopsy on an Empire: Understanding Mortality in Russia and the Former Soviet Union," by Elizabeth Brainerd and David M. Cutler (w10868, November 2004, .pdf format, 71p.).

Abstract:

Male life expectancy at birth fell by over six years in Russia between 1989 and 1994. Many other countries of the former Soviet Union saw similar declines, and female life expectancy fell as well. Using cross-country and Russian household survey data, we assess six possible explanations for this upsurge in mortality. Most find little support in the data: the deterioration of the health care system, changes in diet and obesity, and material deprivation fail to explain the increase in mortality rates. The two factors that do appear to be important are alcohol consumption, especially as it relates to external causes of death (homicide, suicide, and accidents) and stress associated with a poor outlook for the future. However, a large residual remains to be explained.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10868
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Population Council: "Long-range trends in adult mortality: Models and projection methods," by John Bongaarts (Working Paper 192, 2004, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

This study has two objectives: (1) to test a new version of the logistic model for the pattern of change over time in age-specific adult mortality rates, and (2) to develop a new method for projecting future trends in adult mortality. A test of the goodness-of-fit of the logistic model for the force of mortality indicates that its slope parameter is nearly constant over time. This finding suggests a variant of the model that is called the shifting logistic model. A new projection method based on the shifting mortality model is proposed and compared with the widely used Lee-Carter procedure.

http://www.popcouncil.org/pdfs/wp/192.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

World Bank Development Programme:

A. "Emerging Infrastructure Policy Issues in Developing Countries: A Survey of the Recent Economic Literature," by Antonio Estache (Working Paper 3442, November 2004, .pdf format, 42p.).

Abstract:

Estache reviews the recent economic research on emerging issues for infrastructure policies affecting poor people in developing countries. His main purpose is to identify some of the challenges the international community, and donors in particular, are likely to have to address over the next few years. He addresses six main issues: (1) the necessity of infrastructure in achieving the Millennium Development Goals; (2) the various dimensions of financing challenges for infrastructure; (3) the debate on the relative importance of urban and rural infrastructure needs; (4) the debate on the effectiveness of infrastructure decentralization; (5) what works and what does not when trying to target the needs of the poor, with an emphasis on affordability and regulation challenges; and (6) the importance of governance and corruption in the sector. The author concludes by showing how the challenges identified define a relatively well integrated agenda for both researchers and the international infrastructure community.

http://econ.worldbank.org/view.php?topic=19&type=5&id=39967

Click on "PDF" or the mail icon for full text.

B. "Predicting the Poverty Impacts of Trade Reform," by Jeffrey J. Reimer and Thomas W. Hertel (Working Paper 3444, November 2004, .pdf format, 40p.).

Abstract:

An important area of research in recent years involves assessing the microeconomic implications of macro-level policies--particularly those related to international trade. While a wide range of research methodologies are available for assessing the microeconomic incidence of micro-policies, as well as for assessing the effect of macro-level policies on markets and broad groups of households, there is a gap when it comes to eliciting the disaggregated household and firm level effects of trade policies. Recent research addresses this knowledge gap and the present survey offers an overview of this literature. The preponderance of the evidence from the studies encompassed by this survey points to the dominance of earnings-side effects over consumption-side effects of trade reform. This is problematic, since household surveys are notable for their underreporting of income. From the perspective of the poor, it is the market for unskilled labor that is most important. The poverty effects of trade policy often hinge crucially on how well the increased demand for labor in one part of the economy is transmitted to the rest of the economy by way of increased wages, increased employment, or both. Further econometric research aimed at discriminating between competing factor mobility hypotheses is urgently needed.

http://econ.worldbank.org/view.php?topic=19&type=5&id=40004

Click on "PDF" or the mail icon for full text.

C. "The Long-Term Legacy of the Khmer Rouge Period in Cambodia," by Damien de Walque (Working Paper 3446, November 2004, .pdf format, 43p.).

Abstract:

De Walque studies the long-term impact of genocide during the period of the Khmer Rouge (1975-79) in Cambodia and contributes to the literature on the economic analysis of conflict. Using mortality data for siblings from the Cambodia Demographic and Health Survey in 2000, he shows that excess mortality was extremely high and heavily concentrated during 1974-80. Adult males had been the most likely to die, indicating that violent death played a major role. Individuals with an urban or educated background were more likely to die. Infant mortality was also at very high levels during the period, and disability rates from land mines or other weapons were high for males who, given their birth cohort, were exposed to this risk. The very high and selective mortality had a major impact on the population structure of Cambodia. Fertility and marriage rates were very low under the Khmer Rouge but rebounded immediately after the regime~Rs collapse. Because of the shortage of eligible males, the age and education differences between partners tended to decline. The period had a lasting impact on the educational attainment of the population. The education system collapsed during the period, so individuals--especially males--who were of schooling age during this interval had a lower educational attainment than the preceding and subsequent birth cohorts.

http://econ.worldbank.org/view.php?topic=12&type=5&id=40041

Click on "PDF" or the mail icon for full text.

D. "India's Public Health System: How Well Does It Function at the National Level?" by Monica Das Gupta, and Manju Rani (Working Paper 3447, November 2004, .pdf format, 24p.).

Abstract:

India has relatively poor health outcomes, despite having a well-developed administrative system, good technical skills in many fields, and an extensive network of public health institutions for research, training, and diagnostics. This suggests that the health system may be misdirecting its efforts, or may be poorly designed. To explore this, Das Gupta and Rani use instruments developed to assess the performance of public health systems in the United States and Latin America based on the framework of the Essential Public Health Functions, identified as the basic functions that an effective public health system must fulfill. The authors focus on the federal level in India, using data obtained from senior health officials in the central government. The data indicate that the reported strengths of the system lie in having the capacity to carry out most of the public health functions. Its reported weaknesses lie in three broad areas. First, it has overlooked some fundamental public health functions such as public health regulations and their enforcement. Second, deep management flaws hinder effective use of resources--including inadequate focus on evaluation, on assessing quality of services, on dissemination and use of information, and on openness to learning and innovation. Resources could also be much better used with small changes, such as the use of incentives and challenge funds, and greater flexibility to reassign resources as priorities and needs change. Third, the central government functions too much in isolation and needs to work more closely with other key actors, especially with subnational governments, as well as with the private sector and with communities. The authors conclude that with some reassessment of priorities and better management practices, health outcomes could be substantially improved.

http://econ.worldbank.org/view.php?topic=12&type=5&id=40042

Click on "PDF" or the mail icon for full text.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Econometric Society 2004 Far Eastern Meetings:

A. "Determinants of Poverty in Eritrea: A Household level Analysis," by Eyob Fissuh and Mark Harris (2004, .pdf format, 35p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses DOGEV model for modelling determinates of poverty in Eritrea by employing Eritrean Household Income and Expenditure Survey 1996/97 data. Education impacts welfare differently across poverty categories and there are pockets of poverty in the educated population sub group. Effect of household size is not the same across poverty categories. Contrary to the evidence in the literature the relationship between age and probability of being poor was found to be convex to the origin. Regional unemployment was found to be positively associated with poverty. Remittances, house ownership and access to sewage and sanitation facilities were found to be highly negatively related to poverty. This paper also finds out that there is captivity in poverty category and a significant correlation between poverty orderings which renders usage of standard multinomial/ordered logit in poverty analysis less defensible.

http://repec.org/esAUSM04/up.26810.1088476172.pdf

B. "The Structure of Public Expenditures, Agricultural Income and Rural Poverty: Evidence from 10 Latin American countries," by Ramon Lopez (May 2004, .pdf format, 39p.).

http://repec.org/esLATM04/up.21914.1086380292.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), University of Bonn [Germany]:

A. "The Use of Alternative Work Arrangements by the Jobless: Evidence from the CAEAS/CPS," by John T. Addison and Christopher J. Surfield (Discussion Paper 1378, November 2004, .pdf format, 18p.).

Abstract:

Alternative work arrangements (AWAs), such as contracting, consulting, and temporary work, have been criticized as providing only atypical, even precarious, employment. Yet they may also allow workers to locate suitable job matches. Exploiting data from all four Contingent and Alternative Employment Arrangement Supplements to the Current Population Survey, we investigate the initial job-finding strategies pursued by the unemployed. Within the narrow window offered by the data, we find that unemployed workers who become reemployed are more likely to find work in AWAs than in regular, open-ended employment. When we evaluate the use of AWAs against unemployment, there is also evidence that the jobless are entering AWAs as pathways out of their initial labor market state

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1378.pdf

B. "Adjusting Household Structure: School Enrollment Impacts of Child Fostering in Burkina Faso," by Richard Akresh (Discussion Paper 1379, November 2004, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

Researchers claim that children growing up away from their biological parents may be at a disadvantage and have lower human capital investment. This paper measures the impact of child fostering on school enrollment and uses household and child fixed effects regressions to address the endogeneity of fostering. Data collection by the author involved tracking and interviewing the sending and receiving household participating in each fostering exchange, allowing a comparison of foster children with their non-fostered biological siblings. Foster children are equally likely as their host siblings to be enrolled after fostering and are 3.6 percent more likely to be enrolled than their biological siblings. Relative to children from nonfostering households, host siblings, biological siblings, and foster children all experience increased enrollment after the fostering exchange, indicating fostering may help insulate poor households from adverse shocks. This Pareto improvement in schooling translates into a long-run improvement in educational and occupational attainment.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1379.pdf

C: "Selection Policy and the Labour Market Outcomes of New Immigrants," by Deborah Cobb-Clark (Discussion Paper 1380, November 2004, .pdf format, 36p.).

Abstract:

Many countries are placing a greater emphasis on productive skills in the immigrant selection policies as a way of achieving national objectives regarding immigration. These changes stem primarily from the belief that skill-based immigrants do better in some sense and provide greater economic benefits than immigrants admitted on the basis of their family relationships. This paper takes advantage of a change in Australian selection policy in the 1990s to assess the extent to which selection policy can facilitate employment outcomes for new arrivals over the medium run. The results indicate that the increased emphasis on productive skills in the selection process led to striking differences in the human capital endowments of new immigrants. These improvements in human capital in turn completely explain the higher participation rates amongst immigrants arriving in Australia at the end of the 1990s. Moreover, approximately half of the fall in men's unemployment rates also stems from increases in productive skills, though the substantial decline in women's unemployment rates are driven solely by changes in the returns to skills rather than skill levels themselves. Overall, these results indicate that there is a large potential for selection policy to influence immigrant outcomes not just immediately after migration but also in the medium run. At the same time, it is also clear that income-support policy and the overall state of the Australian labour market also had a hand in improving the labour market position of new arrivals.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1380.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER), University of Essex [Colchester, UK]: "Linking Household Survey and Administrative Record Data: what should the matching variables be?" by Stephen P. Jenkins, Peter Lynn, Annette Jackle, and Emanuela Sala (WP 2004-23, October 2004, .pdf format, 21p.).

Abstract:

Linkages of household survey responses with administrative data may be based on unique individual identifiers or on survey respondent characteristics. The benefits gained from using unique identifiers need to be assessed in the light of potential problems such as non-response and measurement error. We report on a study that linked survey responses to UK government agency records on benefits and tax credits in five different ways. One matched on a respondent-supplied National Insurance Number and the other four used different combinations of sex, name, address, and date of birth. As many linkages were made using matches on sex, date of birth, and post-code, or on sex, date of birth, first name and family name, as were made using matches on self-reported National Insurance Number, and the former were also relatively accurate when assessed in terms of false positive and false negative rates. The five independent matching exercises also shed light on the potential returns from hierarchical and pooled matching.

http://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/pubs/workpaps/pdf/2004-23.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Stockholm [Sweden] School of Economics European Institute of Japanese Studies: "Divorce in Japan Why It Happens, Why It Doesn't," by Hiroshi Ono (Working Paper 201, September 2004, .pdf format, 18p.).

Abstract:

In this paper I address two critical questions about divorce in postwar Japan: Why is the divorce rate so low compared to other industrialized economies? And, Why is it rising? I examine divorce in the context of institutional change, and discuss how the rising divorce rate in Japan is an outcome of the dynamic interactions between economic development and demographic change at the macro-level, and changes in social norms and attitudes that govern the behavior of individuals at the micro-level. The divorce rate in Japan is rising because there is a tradeoff between marital stability and gender equality. The drive towards equal status between the sexes narrows the dependency between the spouses, and offsets the costs and benefits of marriage. Lower dependency allows greater voice, and lowers the cost of exiting a marriage. The diversity of family forms such as civil unions and cohabitation allows couples to choose alternatives to marriage, which in turn weakens the institution of marriage. Alternatively, the divorce rate in Japan is low compared to the U.S. and Europe because dependency between the spouses is greater, alternatives to marriage are fewer, and the legacy of the traditional gender division of labor continues to influence the actions and attitudes of men and women.

http://swopec.hhs.se/eijswp/papers/eijswp0201.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

University of Potsdam [Germany] Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaftliche Fakultat Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeitrage: "A Simulation of Segregation in Cities and its Application for the Analysis of Rent Control," by Wolfgang Wagner (Discussion Paper 71, 2004, .pdf format, 17p.).

Abstract:

Social segregation in cities takes place where different household groups exist and when, according to Schelling, their location choice either minimizes the number of differing households in their neighborhood or maximizes their own group. In this contribution an evolutionary simulation based on a monocentric city model with externalities among households is used to discuss the spatial segregation patterns of four groups. The resulting complex spatial patterns can be shown as graphic animations. They can be applied as initial situation for the analysis of the effects a rent control has on segregation.

http://www.uni-potsdam.de/u/ls_vwl_witheorie/DP71.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Centro di Economia Del Lavoro e di Politica Economica (Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno [Italy]: "The Gender Wage Gap Among Young People in Italy," by Francesco Pastore and Izabela Marcinkowska (Discussion Paper 82, September 2004, .pdf format, 41p.).

Abstract:

This paper provides evidence of the gender wage gap among young people (18-24) in Italy based on the YUSE data set and involves the Oaxaca and Ransom (1994) decomposition of the unconditional gender wage gap into discrimination and productivity components. About 70% of the overall gap is unexplained, a component which is higher than among adults. Almost 11% of the gap is explained by segregation of women in low wage industries. In the Northern Veneto, the explained component of the gap is almost double that in the Southern Campania (36.4%). This is clear evidence of the remarkable discrimination that young women experience especially in Southern regions, similar to the adult women.

http://www.celpe.unisa.it/DP/dp82.pdf

Return to top

=========================================================================

JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

Other Journals

American Journal of Epidemiology (Vol. 160, No. 9,10 Nov. 1,15 2004).

http://aje.oupjournals.org/archive/2004.dtl

Click on "November (160,9) or (160,10) for tables of contents.

Return to top

=========================================================================

CONFERENCES:

Federation of Canadian Demographers Call for Papers: "The Federation of Canadian Demographers announces a special conference on the contributions of longitudinal approaches to the understanding of the challenges that demographic trends represent for 21st century societies." The conference will be held Nov. 18-19, 2005 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. For more information on the conference, as well ad paper submission deadlines see (.pdf format, 2p.):

http://www.iussp.org/Announcements/FCD%20call%20for%20papers%20FINAL.pdf

Return to top

=========================================================================

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

American Educational Research Association Call For Applications: "With support from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) of the Institute of Education Sciences and the National Science Foundation (NSF), the AERA Grants Program announces its AERA Institute on Statistical Analysis for Education Policy. The Institute's goal is to help develop a critical mass of U.S. educational researchers using NCES and NSF data sets for basic, policy, and applied research. The Institute provides hands-on training for researchers in the use of large-scale national data sets, with special emphasis on using these data sets for policy-related research in education. Minority researchers are strongly encouraged to apply... In 2005 the AERA Institute on Statistical Analysis for Education Policy will focus on education policy issues that can be addressed using modern methods for causal inference with data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health).The Institute will address these issues using log linear modeling. The Institute provides hands-on instruction to help participants develop knowledge and skills in the use of NCES data for education policy research and application." Application deadline is Jan. 5, 2005. For more information see:

http://www.aera.net/grantsprogram/res_training/stat_institute/SIFly.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kaiser Family Foundation Barbara Jordan Health Policy Scholars Program: "The Scholars Program brings talented Latino, African American, Asian/Pacific Islander and American Indian/Alaska Native college seniors and recent graduates to Washington, DC, where they work in congressional offices and learn about health policy. Through the nine-week program (May 24 - July 29, 2005), Scholars gain knowledge about federal legislative procedure and health policy issues, while further developing their critical thinking and leadership skills. In addition to an internship in a congressional office, Scholars participate in seminars and site visits to augment their knowledge of health care issues, and write and present a health policy research memo. The program is based at Howard University." For more information see:

http://www.kff.org/about/jordanscholars.cfm

Return to top

=========================================================================

LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES:

House Education and the Workforce Committee:

A. "The Schools Safely Acquiring Faculty Excellence Act of 2003," a hearing held May 24, 2004 (House Serial Publication 108-60, ASCII text and .pdf format, 25p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/house06ch108.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "108-60" (without the quotes).

B. "Highly Qualified Teachers and Raising Student Achievement, Field Hearing," a hearing held May 27, 2004 (House Serial Publication 108-61, ASCII text and .pdf format, 53p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/house06ch108.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "108-61" (without the quotes).

C. "No Child Left Behind: Improving Academic Achievement Through Flexibility and Accountability for Schools," a hearing held Apr. 15, 2004, (House Serial Publication 108-50, ASCII text and .pdf format, 44p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/house06ch108.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "108-50" (without the quotes).

D. "No Child Left Behind: Improving Results for Children with Disabilities," a hearing held Mar. 3, 2004 (House Serial Publication 108-45, ASCII text and .pdf format, 44p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/house06ch108.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "108-45" (without the quotes).

E. "The Status of No Child Left Behind Implementation in Ohio, Field Hearing," a hearing held Mar. 8, 2004 (House Serial Publication 108-46, ASCII text and .pdf format, 50p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/house06ch108.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "108-46" (without the quotes).
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Senate Committee on Indian Affairs: "No Child Left Behind Act, on Oversight Hearing on Implementation in Native American Communities of the No Child Left Behind Act," a hearing held Jun. 16, 2004 (Senate Hearing 108-621, ASCII text and .pdf format, 87p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/senate/senate13ch108.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "108-621" (without the quotes).

Return to top

=========================================================================

DATA:

World Health Organization: "The WHO Mortality Database has updated its ICD10 database."

http://www3.who.int/whosis/mort/text/download.cfm

Scroll to the bottom of the page for the data.

Return to top

Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu