Current Demographic Research Report #51, September 27, 2004.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Facts for Features
_MMWR_ Articles, Recommendations & Reports
Centers for Disease Control Periodical
National Center for Health Statistics Reports
World Health Organization Monograph, Compendium, News Release, Feature
DHHS SAMHSA Brief
Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General Report
DHHS OASPE Summary Brief
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Periodical
Bureau of Labor Statistics News Releases
Pan American Health Organization Periodical
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Report
_Demographic Research_ Article
Population Reference Bureau ICPD Special Update, Articles
Urban Institute Monograph, Issue Briefs
Kaiser Family Foundation Reports
MEASURE DHS+ Reports
_Nature_ Article Extract
_New England Journal of Medicine_ Perspective Extract, Special Article
Info Health Pop Reporter

WORKING PAPERS

University of Texas at Austin Population Research Center
University of Michigan Population Studies Center
Princeton University Office of Population Research
Penn State Population Research Institute
Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty
National Bureau of Economic Research
World Bank Policy Research

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Non-Ingenta Journals

CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS

National Poverty Center/European Union Center (University of Michigan) Call for
Papers

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

United Nations Population Affairs Officer

DATA

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)
Centers for Disease Control

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REPORTS, ARTICLES, NEWS RELEASES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Facts for Features:

A. "Opening of the National Museum of the American Indian" (CB04-FFSE.13, Sep. 21, 2004).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/002776.html

B. "Hispanic Heritage Month" (September 15-October 15, 2004).

http://www.census.gov/pubinfo/www/multimedia/HispHeritage2004.html
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_MMWR_ Articles, Recommendations & Reports:

A. "Childhood Influenza-Vaccination Coverage --- United States, 2002--03 Influenza Season" (Centers for Disease Control, _Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_, Vol. 53, No. 37, Sep. 24, 2004, HTML and .pdf format, p. 863-866).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5337a1.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5337.pdf

B. "Alcohol-Attributable Deaths and Years of Potential Life Lost --- United States, 2001" (Centers for Disease Control, _Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_, Vol. 53, No. 37, Sep. 24, 2004, HTML and .pdf format, p. 866-870).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5337a2.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5337.pdf

C. "Methodology of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System" (_Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report Recommendations and Reports_ (Vol. 53, No. RR-12, September 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 13p.).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5312a1.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr5312.pdf
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Centers for Disease Control Periodical: _Emerging Infectious Diseases_ (Vol. 10, No. 10, October 2004, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/index.htm

Note: This is a temporary address. When the next _EID_ is released, this one, along with all others, will be available at:

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/pastcon.htm
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National Center for Health Statistics Reports:

A. "Ambulatory Care Visits to Physician Offices, Hospital Outpatient Departments, and Emergency Departments: United States , 1999-2000," by Catharine W. Burt and Susan M. Schappert (Vital and Health Statistics, Series 13, No. 157, September 2004,.pdf format, 70p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/04facts/ambulatorycare.htm

Click on "View/download PDF" for full text.

B. "Measuring Progress in Healthy People 2010," by Kenneth G. Keppel, Jeffrey N. Pearcy, and Richard J. Klein (Healthy People 2010 Statistical Notes No. 25, September 2004, .pdf format, 16p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/statnt/statnt25.pdf
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World Health Organization Monograph, Compendium, News Release, Feature:

A. _WHO Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality_ Vol. 1, Third Edition (2004, .pdf format, 515p.). The monograph is linked to from a WHO news release: "WHO issues revised drinking water guidelines to help prevent water-related outbreaks and disease" (Sep. 21, 2004).

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2004/pr67/en/

Click on "full text" for link to full text.

B. _The Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke_, by Judith MacKay and George A. Mensah (2004, .pdf format, 85p.). "The atlas addresses the global epidemic of heart disease and stroke in a clear and accessible format. This highly valuable reference material has been designed for use by policy makers, national and international organizations, health professionals and the general public. This picturesque atlas is in six parts: cardiovascular disease; risk factors; the burden; action; the future and the past; and world tables." Note: Print copy ordering information is also available at the site.

http://www.who.int/cardiovascular_diseases/resources/atlas/en/

C. "Combining TB treatment with HIV testing and treatment could save lives of up to 500,000 HIV-positive Africans every year" (Sep. 21, 2004).

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2004/pr66/en/

D. "Great expectations." "The subject of World Health Day 2005 is maternal and child health. In the lead up to World Health Day on 7 April next year, six mothers-to-be living in different countries of the world will share their experiences of pregnancy and childbirth. The first part of this feature series introduces these women at five months into their pregnancies. We will return to their stories again when they are seven months pregnant, at the birth of their babies, at one week after birth, and finally when their babies are six weeks old."

http://www.who.int/features/2004/great_expectations/en/
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Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services (SAMHSA) Brief: "Risk & Protective Factors for Substance Use Among American Indian or Alaska Native Youths" (National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), September 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k4/AmIndianYouthRF/AmIndianYouthRF.cfm
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Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General Report: "Variation in State Medicaid Drug Prices" (OEI-05-02-00681, September 2004, .pdf format, 39p.). "This inspection report assessed the extent to which States vary in their Medicaid pharmacy reimbursement for the same drugs. The Medicaid program could benefit from substantial savings if all States reimbursed pharmacies at prices closer to the drug reimbursement prices paid by the lowest paying States. The OIG analyzed Fiscal Year 2001 prescription drug reimbursement data for 28 drugs from 42 States. We found that the highest paying State's unit reimbursement price ranged from 12 to 4,073 percent more per drug than the lowest paying State for the 28 drugs. On average, the highest paying State paid almost $200 more per package than the lowest paying State for these drugs. Medicaid could have saved $86.7 million in FY 2001 if all States had reimbursed at the same price as the lowest paying State for each of the 28 drugs. Multiple factors contribute to the differences in drug prices across States. Even States with the same formula for estimating pharmacy acquisition costs demonstrated variation in their average annual reimbursement prices. This report recommended that CMS: (1) share average manufacturer price data with States, (2) conduct further research on the factors that affect States' drug prices, and (3) annually review States' reimbursement data to target technical assistance to higher paying States.

http://www.oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-05-02-00681.pdf
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Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation Summary Issue Brief: "Spending on Social Welfare Programs in Rich and Poor States (June 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 18p.).

http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/social-welfare-spending04/summary.htm
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Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Periodical: _Juvenile Justice Bulletin_ (NCJ 204608, September 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 12p.). The topic of the latest issue is "Juvenile Arrests 2002," by Howard N. Snyder.

HTML:

http://www.ncjrs.org/html/ojjdp/204608/contents.html

.pdf:

http://www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/ojjdp/204608.pdf
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Bureau of Labor Statistics News Releases:

A. "Employee Tenure in 2004" (Sep. 21, 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 11p.).

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/tenure.toc.htm

B. "Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries Summary, 2003" (Sep. 22, 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 17p.).

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cfoi.toc.htm

C. "Productivity by Industry: Wholesale Trade, Retail Trade, and Food Services and Drinking Places, 2003" (Sep. 24, 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 7p.).

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/prin.toc.htm
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Pan American Health Organization Periodical: _Perspectives in Health: The magazine of the Pan American Health Organization_ (Vol. 9, No. 2, 2004). Note: this is a special issue on PAHO Millennium Development Goals.

http://www.paho.org/English/DD/PIN/perspectives20.htm
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Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Report: "Australia's Mothers and Babies 2001," by Paula J. Laws and Elizabeth A. Sullivan (Perinatal Statistics Series No. 13, September 2004, .pdf format, 84p.). The report is linked to from an AIHW news release: "Twin births on the rise in Australia" (Sep. 21, 2004).

http://www.aihw.gov.au/media/2004/mr040923.html

Click on "AIHW Publications Catalogue" at the bottom of the page for link to full text.
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_Demographic Research_ Article: Note: _DR_ is "a free, expedited, peer-reviewed journal of the population sciences published by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research [Rostock Germany]. "Australia's uncertain demographic future," by Tom Wilson and Martin Bell (Vol. 11, Article 8, September 2004, .pdf format, p. 195-234).

Abstract:

The techniques of probabilistic population forecasting are increasingly being recognised as a profitable means of overcoming many of the limitations of conventional deterministic variant population forecasts. This paper applies these techniques to present the first comprehensive set of probabilistic population forecasts for Australia. We stress the disadvantages of directly inputting net migration into the cohort component model in probabilistic forecasting, and propose a gross migration flows model which distinguishes between permanent and non-permanent immigration and emigration. Our forecasts suggest that there is a two thirds probability of Australia~Rs population being between 23.0 and 25.8 million by 2026 and between 24.4 and 31.8 million by 2051. Comparisons with the latest official population projections of the Australian Bureau of Statistics are made.

http://www.demographic-research.org/

Click on "Enter".
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Population Reference Bureau ICPD [International Conference on Population and Development] Special Update, Articles:

A. "The Double Divide: Implosionists and Explosionists Endanger Progress Since Cairo," by William P. Butz (ICPD + 10 Special Update, September 2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/04_Articles/The_Double_Divide__Implosionists_and_Explosionists_Endanger_Progress_Since_Cairo.htm

B. "What Was Cairo? The Promise and Reality of ICPD + 10," by Lori S. Ashford (ICPD + 10 Special Update, September 2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/04_Articles/What_Was_Cairo__The_Promise_and_Reality_of_ICPD.htm

C. "ICPD at 10: Mixed Reviews, Much to Do," by Sanjay Suri (ICPD + 10 Special Update, September 2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/04_Articles/ICPD_at_10__Mixed_Reviews,_Much_to_Do.htm

D. "Darfur Highlights the Impact of Food Insecurity on Women," by Melissa Thaxton (2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/04_Articles/Darfur_Highlights_the_Impact_of_Food_Insecurity_on_Women.htm

E. "Iran Faces Pressure to Provide Jobs, Address Health Disparities," by Yvette Collymore (September 2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/04_Articles/Iran_Faces_Pressure_to_Provide_Jobs,_Address_Health_Disparities.htm

F. "Poverty Up, Number of Insured Down in the United States," by Robert Lalasz (September 2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/04_Articles/Poverty_Up,_Number_of_Insured_Down_in_the_U_S_.htm

G. "Islam and Family Planning," by Farzaneh Roudi-Fahimi (September 2004, .pdf format, 8p.).

http://www.prb.org/pdf04/islam&familyplanning.pdf

H. "Sydney Redux: Bahamas Defends Demographic Olympics Title," by Kelvin Pollard (September 2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/04_Articles/Sydney_Redux__Bahamas_Defends_Demographic_Olympics_Title.htm

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Urban Institute Monograph, Issue Briefs:

A. _Evaluation of California's Immigrant Education Offers Vital Lessons for National Policy_, by Alec Ian Gershberg, Anne Dannenberg, and Patricia Sanchez (2004, 256 pages, ISBN 0-87766-723-3, 29.50 US dollars). For more information, including ordering information see:

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=900741

B. "Marriage Promotion and the Living Arrangements of Black, Hispanic, and White Children," by Laura Wherry and Kenneth Finegold (New Federalism: National Survey of America's Families B-61, September 2004, .pdf format, 7p.). "This brief uses data from the 1997 and 2002 National Survey of America's Families to analyze racial and ethnic differences in children's living arrangements and the implications for federal and state marriage promotion policies. Black children are more likely than Hispanic or white children to live with a single parent and most black single parents have never been married. Most single parents of white children are divorced. Hispanic children are more likely than black or white children to live with unmarried cohabiting parents. Between 1997 and 2002, the share of children living with unmarried cohabiting parents rose among blacks, Hispanics, and whites, but the decline in the share of children living with single parents was significant among Hispanics only."

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311064

Click on "PDF" for full text.

C. "A Health-Conscious Safety Net? Health Problems and Program Use among Low-Income Adults with Disabilities," by David Wittenburg (New Federalism: National Survey of America's Families B-62, September 2004, .pdf format, 7p.). "Many low-income adults have a health problem or impairment that limits their ability to participate in work. This brief examines the employment and program participation patterns of low-income adults with disabilities, and how well the current safety net meets their needs. Using data from the third round of the National Survey of America's families, the findings question current benefits and services, as many will likely lead to a lifetime of support rather than to a job. The employment rates of those with disabilities are much lower than among other low-income adults."

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311065

Click on "PDF" for full text.
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Kaiser Family Foundation Reports:

A. "Parents, Media and Public Policy: A Kaiser Family Foundation Survey" (Program for the Study of Entertainment Media and Health, September 2004, .pdf format, 30p.). "Parents, Media and Public Policy," a new national survey from the Kaiser Family Foundation, explores how parents feel about media content and ratings systems. The survey found that a majority of parents say they are 'very' concerned about the amount of sex (60%) and violence (53%) their children are exposed to on TV. The survey of 1,001 parents of children ages 2-17 was conducted in July and August 2004.

http://www.kff.org/entmedia/7156.cfm

B. "Building an On-Ramp to Children's Health Coverage: A Report on California's Express Lane Eligibility Program," by Dawn C. Horner with Beth Morrow and Wendy Lazarus (Express Lane Eligibility Issue Brief, September 2004, .pdf format, 14p.). "his report documents the results from California's Express Lane Eligibility (ELE) initiative through the school lunch program (now one year into implementation), which has been piloted in 72 schools in 5 school districts in the state. ELE is an enrollment strategy that targets large numbers of uninsured children, who are eligible for the federal-state programs Medicaid and SCHIP, where they can be found: in other public programs like school lunch and food stamps."

http://www.kff.org/medicaid/7173.cfm
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MEASURE DHS+ Reports:

A. "Profiling Domestic Violence: A Multi-Country Study," by Sunita Kishor and Kiersten Johnson (June 2004, .pdf format, 120p.).

http://www.measuredhs.com/pubs/pdf/OD31/DV.pdf

B. "Ghana 2003 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey (FR152) (2004). Note: Print copies are available free of charge (up to 10 copies). For more information see:

http://www.measuredhs.com/aboutsurveys/survey_status.cfm

Scroll to "Ghana 2003" and click "Order".
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_Nature_ Article Extract: "Tropism switching in Bordetella bacteriophage defines a family of diversity-generating retroelements," by Sergei Doulatov, Asher Hodes. Lixin Dai, Neeraj Mandhana, Minghsun Liu, Rajendar Deor, Robert W. Simons, Steven Zimmerly and Jeff F. Miller (Vol. 431, No. 7007, Sep. 23, 2004, p. 476-481).

http://www.nature.com/cgi-taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v431/n7007/abs/nature02833_fs.html

National Institutes of Health News Release:

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/sep2004/niaid-22.htm
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_New England Journal of Medicine_ Perspective Extract, Special Article:

A. "Eradicating Polio," by David L. Heymann and R. Bruce Aylward (Vol. 351, No. 13, p. 1275-1277).

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/extract/351/13/1275

B. "Health Care in the 2004 Presidential Election," by Robert J. Blendon, Drew E. Altman, John M. Benson, and Mollyann Brodie (Vol. 351, No. 13, HTML and .pdf format, p. 1314-1322). This article is freely available to the public.

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/351/13/1314
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Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (Vol. 4, No. 39, Sep. 27, 2004). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

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WORKING PAPERS:

University of Texas at Austin Population Research Center: "Age at First Birth, Health, and Mortality," by John Mirowsky (WP 04-05-03, 2004).

Abstract:

The bio-developmental view sees the readiness and soundness of the organism at the time of first birth as its prime link to health and survival years and decades later. It suggests an optimum age at first birth shortly after puberty. The bio-social view emphasizes social correlates and consequences of age at first birth that may influence health and survival many years later. It suggests that better health and survival come from delaying motherhood as long as possible, perhaps indefinitely. Analyses consistently find patterns more in keeping with the bio-social view in a U.S. national sample of women ages 25 through 95. The fitted curves show high levels of current health problems among women who first gave birth in or shortly after puberty. Problems drop steadily the longer that first birth was delayed, up to about age 34, then rise increasingly steeply, particularly after about age 40. For women currently of the same age, the ratio of health problems expected given first birth under age 18 versus around age 34 equals that from currently being 14 years older. Health problems rise steeply with length of having delayed beyond age 40. Mortality hazard also declines with having delayed first birth well beyond the end of puberty. The ratio of mortality hazard between mothers with teenage versus late first births equals that from a 10-year difference in current age. Comparison to non-mothers of similar age and race/ethnicity shows that the correlation of motherhood with health problems and mortality hazard switches from detrimental to beneficial with delay beyond about age 22.

http://www.prc.utexas.edu/working_papers/series_04-05.html

Scroll to 04-05-03 working paper and contact the author at the listed email address to receive a copy.
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University of Michigan Population Studies Center:

A. "Everything's There Except Money": How Economic Factors Shape the Decision to Marry Among Cohabiting Couples," by Pamela J. Smock, Wendy D. Manning, and Meredith Porter (PSC Research Report 04-564. September 2004, .pdf format, 25p.).

Abstract:

Unmarried cohabitation has become increasingly prominent in the United States and a growing literature has sought to understand the factors that spur cohabiting couples to marry. While quantitative studies suggest that good economic circumstances are associated with marriage, the mechanisms and the sequencing through which economics influence marriage are less well understood. Drawing on data from 115 in-depth interviews with cohabiting young adults from the working and middle classes, this paper explores whether and in what ways economic circumstances shape perspectives on marriage. We find that cohabitors typically perceive finances as important for marriage, with common themes including having "enough" money, being able to afford a "real" wedding, having achieved a set of financial goals prior to marriage (e.g., home ownership, financial stability), and the ability of the male partner to be an economic provider. While some social scientists have speculated that cohabitors must think that something will change in their lives in order to motivate marriage, our findings suggest that cohabitors think marriage should occur once something has already changed; that is, marriage does not mean that you are working to become financially comfortable, but that you already are.

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.shtml?ID=34510

Click on PDF icon for full text.

B. "Undercount in China's 2000 Census in Comparative Perspective," by Barbara A. Anderson (PSC Research Report 04-565. September 2004, .pdf format, 23p.).

Abstract:

There was concern after the 1995 Mid-Censal Survey of China about an undercount, especially of young men. This concern also was raised about the 2000 Census of China. With a history of high-quality demographic data and a reputation for accurate age reporting some have wondered what happened since 1990 to data quality in China. Undercount in China increased between 1990 and 1995 and decreased between 1995 and 2000. The pattern of undercount by age and sex resembles that found in many other countries. Increased geographic mobility in China in the 1990s is probably the main reason for the increase in the undercount between 1990 and 1995, and steps taken after 1995 likely led to the decrease in the undercount between 1995 and 2000, although the undercount in 2000 was greater than that in 1990. Even if sources of the undercount in China are understood better than in the past, there are substantial challenges in deciding what to do to further decrease or compensate for this undercount.

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.shtml?ID=34512

Click on PDF icon for full text.
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Princeton University Office of Population Research: "Perceived Stress and Physiological Dysregulation," by Noreen Goldman Dana A. Glei, Christopher L. Seplaki, I-Wen Liu, and Maxine Weinstein (WP 2004-05, 2004, .pdf format, 26p.).

Abstract:

We use a population-based representative sample of older Taiwanese to investigate links between perceived stress and a broad set of biological measures. These biomarkers were collected at a single time (2000) and reflect SNS-activity, HPA-activity, immune function, cardiovascular response, and metabolic pathways. We model the relationship between measures of perceived stress and (1) both high and low values for each of 16 individual biological indicators; and (2) a measure of cumulative physiological dysregulation based on the full set of biomarkers. We consider two measures of perceived stress, one derived from the 2000 interview and a second based on data from three interviews (1996-2000). Age and sex-adjusted models reveal significant associations between measures of perceived stress and extreme values of cortisol, triglycerides, IL-6, DHEAS and fasting glucose. Numerous biomarkers examined here, including those pertaining to blood pressure and obesity, are not significantly related to perceived stress. On the other hand, the measure of cumulative physiological dysregulation is associated with both the level of perceived stress at a given time and to a longitudinal measure of perceived stress. Some results suggest that the relationship between level of perceived stress and physiological response is stronger for women than men.

http://opr.princeton.edu/papers/opr0405.pdf
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Penn State Population Research Institute: "A Population with Continually Declining Mortality," by Robert Schoen, Stefan Hrafn Jonsson and Paula Tufis (WP 04-07, September 2004, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

In recent years, many countries have experienced sustained declines in death rates. Here we present a new dynamic population model that provides a framework for analyzing continuing mortality declines. Every year there is one birth in the model. Mortality increases exponentially over age at rate b while decreasing exponentially over time at rate c. The model population is strikingly linear in its behavior over time, with many measures changing at a rate that closely approximates a simple function of b and c. The size of the population is virtually the same as the average age at death, and both increase annually by c/b. Period life expectancy at birth also increases linearly by c/b, while the average age of the population increases linearly by c/(2b). Preserving a constant ratio of persons in the economically active ages to those in the retirement ages implies an increase in the "normal" age of retirement of about 6.8c years per year. The interpretability of parameters b and c, the ability to accommodate varying rates of decline, and the linear nature of demographic changes enhance the model~Rs potential for analyzing steadily increasing longevity.

http://www.pop.psu.edu/general/pubs/working_papers/psu-pri/wp0407.pdf
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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research: "The Generations and Gender Contextual Database: concepts and content," by Martin Spielauer (WP 2004-026, September 2004, .pdf format, 47p.).

Abstract:

This paper aims at contributing to a proposal for the concept and content of the Contextual Database of the Generations and Gender Program. We develop guidelines for data collection by identifying the main focus, the key dimensions as well as the main data types of the GGP Contextual Database. Based on these theoretical considerations and with a view to support a multilevel approach to GGP data, we propose a list of 200 variables that include statistical norms, legal norms and regulations, the general economic situation, welfare state policies, and culture.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2004-026.pdf
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University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty:

A. "An Empirical Investigation of the Relationship between Wealth and Health Using the Survey of Consumer Finances," by Audra T. Wenzlow, John Mullahy, Stephanie A. Robert, and Barbara L. Wolfe (Discussion Paper DP 1287-04, September 2004, .pdf format, 45p.).

Abstract:

Building on the sizable literature that demonstrates important relationships between health and income, we address the role of financial wealth and its associations with the health status of individuals aged 25 to 54. We describe the shape of the health gradients in income and wealth and estimate models of self-reported health in which family income and wealth are the main explanatory variables. The results from a battery of alternative estimated model specifications suggest that income and wealth are jointly significant correlates of health, and that wealth plays a stronger role for the oldest members of this age group.

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/irp/pubs/dp128704.pdf

B. "Geographic Skills Mismatch, Job Search, and Race," by Michael A. Stoll (Discussion Paper DP-1288-04, September 2004, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

This paper examines whether a geographic skills mismatch exists between the location of less-educated minorities, in particular African Americans, and high-skill job concentrations, and if so, whether it contributes to the relatively poor employment outcomes of this group. It explores these questions by examining data on the recent geographic search patterns of less-educated workers in Los Angeles and Atlanta from the Multi-City Study of Urban Inequality. These data are combined with employer data from the concurrent Multi-City Employer Survey to characterize the geographic areas searched by respondents with respect to high-skill job requirements. The results indicate that in relation to less-educated whites, comparable blacks and Latinos search in areas with higher levels of job skill requirements. Moreover, racial residential segregation as well as blacks~R lower car-access rates accounts for most of blacks' (but not Latinos') relatively greater mismatch. Evidence is also found that such a geographic skills mismatch is negatively related to employment and accounts for a significant share of the racial differences in employment.

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/irp/pubs/dp128804.pdf
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National Bureau of Economic Research:

A. "Neighborhood Effects on Crime for Female and Male Youth: Evidence from a Randomized Housing Voucher Experiment," by Jeffrey R. Kling, Jens Ludwig, and Lawrence F. Katz (w10777, September 2004 .pdf format, 49p.).

Abstract:

The Moving to Opportunity (MTO) demonstration assigned housing vouchers via random lottery to public housing residents in five cities. We use the exogenous variation in residential locations generated by MTO to estimate neighborhood effects on youth crime and delinquency. The offer to relocate to lower-poverty areas reduces arrests among female youth for violent and property crimes, relative to a control group. For males the offer to relocate reduces arrests for violent crime, at least in the short run, but increases problem behaviors and property crime arrests. The gender difference in treatment effects seems to reflect differences in how male and female youths from disadvantaged backgrounds adapt and respond to similar new neighborhood environments.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w10777

Click on "PDF or submit your email address for full text.

B. "Marriage and Divorce since World War II: Analyzing the Role of Technological Progress on the Formation of Households," by Jeremy Greenwood and Nezih Guner (w10772, September 2004, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

Since World War II there has been: (i) a rise in the fraction of time that married households allocate to market work, (ii) an increase in the rate of divorce, and (iii) a decline in the rate of marriage. What can explain this? It is argued here that technological progress in the household sector has saved on the need for labor at home. This makes it more feasible for singles to maintain their own home, and for married women to work. To address this question, a search model of marriage and divorce is developed. Household production benefits from labor-saving technological progress.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w10772

Click on "PDF or submit your email address for full text.

C. "Disaggregating Employment Protection: The Case of Disability," by Christine Jolls and J.J. Prescott (w10740, September 2004, .pdf format, 47p.).

Studies of the effects of employment protection frequently examine protective legislation as a whole. From a policy reform perspective, however, it is often critical to know which particular aspect of the legislation is responsible for its observed effects. The American with Disabilities Act (ADA), a 1990 federal law covering over 40 million Americans, is a clear case in point. Several empirical studies have suggested that the passage of the ADA reduced rather than increased employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. To the extent this is true, it is crucial to credibly disentangle the different features of this complex and multi-faceted law. Separately evaluating the distinct aspects of the ADA is important not only for determining how the law might best be reformed if some aspects of it produce negative employment effects, but also for improving our understanding of the potential consequences of ADA-like provisions in race and other civil rights laws. This paper exploits state-level variation in pre-ADA legal regimes governing disability discrimination to separately estimate the employment effects of each of the ADA's two primary substantive provisions. We find strong evidence that the immediate post-enactment employment effects of the ADA are attributable to its requirement of "reasonable accommodations" for disabled employees rather than to its potential imposition of firing costs for such employees. Moreover, the pattern of the ADA's effects across states suggests, contrary to widely discussed prior findings based on national-level data, that declining disabled employment after the immediate post-ADA period reflects other factors rather than the ADA itself.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10740

Click on "PDF or submit your email address for full text.

D. "Effects of Child Health on Sources of Public Support," by Nancy E. Reichman, Hope Corman, and Kelly Noonan (w10762, September 2004, .pdf format, 34p.).

Abstract:

We estimate the effects of having a child in poor health on the mother's receipt of both cash assistance and in-kind public support in the form of food, health care, and shelter. We control for a rich set of covariates, include state fixed effects, and test for the potential endogeneity of child health. Mothers with children in poor health are 5 percentage points (20%) more likely to rely on TANF and 16 percentage points more likely to rely on cash assistance (TANF and/or SSI) than those with healthy children. They are also more likely than those with healthy children to receive Medicaid and housing assistance, but not WIC or food stamps.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10762

Click on "PDF or submit your email address for full text.
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World Bank Policy Research: "Remittances and Poverty in Guatemala," by Richard H. Adams Jr. (Working Paper 3418, September 2004, .pdf format, 36p.).

Abstract:

Adams uses a large, nationally representative household survey to analyze the impact of internal remittances (from Guatemala) and international remittances (from the United States) on poverty in Guatemala. With only one exception, he finds that both internal and international remittances reduce the level, depth, and severity of poverty in Guatemala. However, he finds that remittances have a greater impact on reducing the severity as opposed to the level of poverty in Guatemala. For example, the squared poverty gap which measures the severity of poverty--falls by 21.1 percent when internal remittances are included in household income, and by 19.8 percent when international remittances are included in such income. This is true because households in the lowest decile group receive a very large share of their total household income (expenditure) from remittances. Households in the bottom decile group receive between 50 and 60 percent of their total income (expenditure) from remittances. When these "poorest of the poor" households receive remittances, their income status changes dramatically and this in turn has a large effect on any poverty measure--like the squared poverty gap--that considers the number, distance, and distribution of poor households beneath the poverty line.

http://econ.worldbank.org/view.php?topic=19&type=5&id=38931

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

Other Journals

American Journal of Epidemiology (Vol. 160, No. 6, Sep. 15, 2004).

http://aje.oupjournals.org/content/vol160/issue6/

ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science (Vol. 596, No. 1, November 2004).

http://ann.sagepub.com/content/vol596/issue1/?etoc

Journal of Family Issues (Vol. 25, No. 8, November 2004).

http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/vol25/issue8/?etoc

Urban Affairs Review (Vol. 40, No. 2, November 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://uar.sagepub.com/content/vol40/issue2/?etoc

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CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS:

National Poverty Center/European Union Center (University of Michigan) Call for Papers: "Call for papers from US and EU scholars To participate in the conference "Changing Social Policies for Low-Income Families and Less Skilled Workers in the EU and the US," to be held in Ann Arbor Michigan, Apr. 7-8, 2005 (paper abstract submission deadline, Dec. 6, 2004). For more information see:

http://www.lisproject.org/links/socpol.htm

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

United Nations Population Affairs Officer: "Under the supervision of the Chief of the Population Estimates and Projections Section of the Population Division, the incumbent assists in implementing the work programme on population estimates and projections, including national, rural, urban and city populations. The incumbent performs the following functions: · Prepare population estimates and projections. This task includes the application of techniques of demographic analysis to estimate demographic indicators and to evaluate population data for completeness and accuracy so as to adjust the data as needed. It also includes the application and development of techniques or methods of population projections and the provision of expert input to the periodic revisions of assumptions underlying the population projections." For more information see:

https://jobs.un.org/release1/vacancy/display_vac.asp?lang=1200&vacid={F32DF83F-25F4-4B39-A4D2-AAEA4FED1A51}

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DATA:

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR): ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Current Population Survey, December 2002: Food Security Supplement (#3980)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03980.xml

Current Population Survey, November 2001: Tobacco Use Supplement (#4044)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04044.xml

Current Population Survey, January 2004: Displaced Workers, Employee Tenure, and Occupational Mobility Supplement (#4072)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04072.xml
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Centers for Disease Control: CDC has announced the first release of its Global Youth Tobacco Survey. Registration is required in order to access the data:

http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/GYTSDataSets/

For more information on the survey, follow the links at the bottom of this page ("Introduction, Reports, Fact Sheets, etc).

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu