Current Demographic Research Report #50, September 20, 2004.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

========================================================================

Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

Centers for Disease Control Periodical
DHSS SAMHSA Report
National Academies Press Monograph
World Health Organization News Releases
Congressional Budget Office Report
National Center for Education Statistics Report
Bureau of Labor Statistics News Release
Bureau of Justice Statistics Compendium
Government Accountability Office Reports
US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Report
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistical Briefs, Report
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Report
United Nations Population Fund Compendium
SIDCA/PAHO Monograph
_Lancet_ Special Section and Editorial
_Demographic Research_ Articles
Urban Institute Reports
Kaiser Family Foundation Survey Issue Brief
World Bank Development Research Group Report
National Center for Social and Economic Modelling Report
Info Health Pop Reporter
Yale University Economic Growth Center

WORKING PAPERS

Penn State Population Research Institute
University of Texas-Austin Population Research Center
National Bureau of Economic Research
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
European Union
World Bank Development Research Group

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta
Other Journals

INSTITUTES/CALLS FOR PAPERS

Johns Hopkins Fall Institute in Health Policy
UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Call for Papers

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

Foundation for Child Development Young Scholars Program

DATA

Census Bureau
IPUMS Revisions
Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
International Social Survey Program

=========================================================================

REPORTS, ARTICLES, NEWS RELEASES, COMPENDIUMS

Centers for Disease Control Periodical: _Preventing Chronic Disease_ (Vol. 1, No. 4, October 2004, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/

Note: For back issues click on "Issue Archive" on the left side of the screen.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration [SAMHSA] Report: "The DASIS [Drug and Alcohol Services Information System] Report: "Primary Methamphetamine / Amphetamine Treatment Admissions, 1992-2002" (September 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k4/methTX/methTX.cfm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Academies Press Monograph: _Saving Lives, Buying Time: Economics of Malaria Drugs in an Age of Resistance_, edited by Kenneth J. Arrow, Claire Panosian, and Hellen Gelband (Committee on the Economics of Antimalarial Drugs, Board on Global Health, Institute of Medicine, 2004, OpenBook format, 384p.). Note: Print copy ordering information is available at the site.

http://www.nap.edu/catalog/11017.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

World Health Organization News Releases:

A. "Survey concludes deaths in Darfur exceed the emergency threshold" (Sep. 13, 2004). Note: the news release links to a WHO report: "Retrospective Mortality Survey Among the Internally Displaced Population, Greater Darfur, Sudan, August 2004" (September 2004, .pdf format, 35p.).

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2004/pr63/en/

Click on "Full text" under "Darfur mortality survey" for report full text.

B. "AIDS epidemic poses serious threat to Europe" (Sep. 16, 2004).

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2004/pr64/en/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Congressional Budget Office Report: "CBO's Projections of the Labor Force" (September 2004,HTML and .pdf format, 21p.).

http://www.cbo.gov/showdoc.cfm?index=5803&sequence=0&from=7

Click on the "PDF" box at top right of screen for full text.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Center for Education Statistics Report: "Developments in School Finance: 2003," edited by William J. Fowler, Jr. (NCES 2004325, August 2004, .pdf format, 130p.).

Abstract:

This report contains papers presented at the 2003 annual NCES Summer Data Conference. The scholars' papers address teacher turnover; financing urban schools; the costs of improving student performance; distinguishing good schools from bad in principle and practice; an evaluation of the efficacy of state adequacy and equity indicators; school finance reform in Vermont; and school accountability.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2004325
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bureau of Labor Statistics News Release: "American Time Use Survey" (Sep. 14, 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 20p.).

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/atus.toc.htm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bureau of Justice Statistics Compendium: _Compendium of Federal Justice Statistics, 2002_ (NCJ 205368, ASCII text and .pdf format, 123p., with .zip compressed spreadsheets). "Presents national-level statistics describing characteristics of persons processed and the distribution of case processing outcomes at each major stage of the Federal criminal justice system. This annual report includes investigations by U.S. attorneys, prosecutions and declinations, pretrial release and detention, convictions and acquittals, sentencing, appeals, and correctional populations."

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/cfjs02.htm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Government Accountability Office Reports:

A. "2010 Census: Counting Americans Overseas as Part of the Decennial Census Would Not Be Cost Effective" (GAO-04-898, August 2004, .pdf format, 24p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d04898.pdf

B. "Food Stamp Program: Farm Bill Options Ease Administrative Burden,but Options Exist to Streamline Participant Reporting Rules Among Programs" (GAO-04-916, September 2004, .pdf format, 51p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d04916.pdf

Note: These are temporary addresses. GAO reports are always available at:

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gaoreports/index.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Report: "Understanding the Food Stamp Program Participation Decisions of TANF Leavers," by Robert M. Goerge, Mairead Reidy, Sandra Lyons, Meejung Chin, and Allison Harris (E-FAN No. 04011, September 2004, .pdf format, 41p.).

Abstract:

This paper evaluates factors affecting the decision by families that leave the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program to participate in the Food Stamp Program (FSP). Linked Illinois State-level administrative data are combined with Census data and data from the Illinois Families Study survey to evaluate the FSP take-up decision of TANF leavers 3 years after leaving the welfare rolls. Results indicate that in Chicago, neighborhood characteristics and knowledge of FSP eligibility at the district office level are important factors in understanding the FSP participation decision of TANF leavers even after individual or family-level demographic characteristics are taken into account. This evidence suggests that the density of social networks among the food-stamp-eligible population in the district office areas may mediate the effects of office outreach and communication strategies.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/efan04011/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistical Briefs, Report:

A. "Employee Copays and Deductibles for Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance in 1999 and 2002," by John Sommers (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, MEPS Statistical Brief #53, September 2004, .pdf format, 5p.).

Abstract:

Using data from the Insurance Component of the 1999 and 2002 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-IC), this Statistical Brief examines the values of copays and deductibles for employer-sponsored health insurance. Private sector and public sector (state and local government) employers are examined separately and within each sector by size of employer.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=633

B. "Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance for Small Employers in the Private Sector, by Census Division, 2002," by John Sommers (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, MEPS Statistical Brief #54, September 2004, .pdf format, 5p.).

Abstract:

Using data from the Insurance Component of the 2002 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-IC), this Statistical Brief presents estimates for small private sector employers, by census division, on employer-sponsored health insurance offer and enrollment rates and employee contributions.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=634

C. "Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance: Trends in Cost and Access," by Mark W. Stanton (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, MEPS Research in Action #17, September 2004, .pdf format, 11p.).

Abstract:

The U.S. employer-based health insurance market provides insurance coverage to nearly two-thirds of the population under 65. This report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality uses Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) data to provide information that decision makers can use in their efforts to make health insurance more affordable. The percentage of employees who work in a place where insurance is offered has risen in recent years. However, many employers require that employees work full time or go through a waiting period in order to be eligible, and the percentage of employees eligible to enroll where insurance is offered has gone down. Similarly, the percentage of employees who work where insurance is offered and actually enroll has declined. The cost of the employee contribution is a major reason for declining enrollment, and low-wage workers are more sensitive to the size of the employee premium contribution. Hispanics, young adults, and near-elderly working women with health problems were the groups most likely to be uninsured.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=635

Note: Link to full text is at the bottom of the abstract.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Report: "Health Disparities in New York City" (2004, .pdf format, 28p.).

http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/pdf/epi/disparities-2004.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

United Nations Population Fund Compendium: _State of the World Population: 2004_ (September 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 115p.). Note: This page also links to annual reports going back to 1996.

http://www.unfpa.org/swp/swpmain.htm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency/Pan American Health Organization Monograph: _Exclusion in Health in Latin America and the Caribbean_, (Series No. 1, Extension of Social Protection in Health, 2004, .pdf format, 125p.).

http://www.lachsr.org/extension/pdf/extps_lac_eng.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

_Lancet_ Special Section and Editorial: Note: _Lancet_ requires free registration before providing content. _Lancet's_ Sep. 18, 2004 issue (Vol. 364, No. 9439) contains a special Review and Opinion section on "Public Health". Five of the six articles are available free to the public (HTML and .pdf format). There is also a free editorial: "America 2004: voting for a decent global society" (HTML and .pdf format) that may be of interest.

http://www.thelancet.com/journal/vol364/iss9439/contents

Editorial is under "Analysis and Interpretation." "Review and Opinion" is second to last section, near the bottom of the page.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

_Demographic Research_ Articles: Note: _DR_ is a free, expedited, peer-reviewed journal of the population sciences published by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research."

A. "Is marriage loosing its centrality in Italy?" by Alessandro Rosina, Romina Fraboni (Vol. 11, Article 6, September 2004, .pdf format, p. 149-172).

Abstract:

Unlike the countries of north-western Europe, marriage in Italy has maintained a crucial role in the process of family formation. This raise doubts about the possibility that the theory of "second demographic transition" could adequately account for the behaviour of the European population living south of the Alps. The aim of this paper is twofold: to provide some empirical evidence that cohabitation is now spreading in Italy; and to propose an explanation of the delay of their diffusion until the 1990s. The hypothesis proposed here explains the delay, not so much in terms of limited interest of the Italian youth towards this type of union, but with the convenience of the children in the Mediterranean area to avoid choices which are openly clashing with the values of parents.

B. "Trends in East-West German Migration from 1989 to 2002," by Frank Heiland (Vol. 11, Article 7, September 2004, .pdf format, p. 173-194).

Abstract:

The purpose of this article is to show recent trends in regional migration from East to West Germany by combining data from the Statistisches Bundesamt from 1991 to 2002 with data from the Zentrales Einwohnerregister der DDR from 1989 to 1990. We document that annual gross outmigration rates peaked at the time of the Reunification, fell sharply thereafter, but rose steadily from the 1997 until 2001 to reach levels obtained prior to the Reunification. While Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Brandenburg experienced less outmigration before the Reunification compared to Thueringen, Sachsen, and Sachsen-Anhalt, they are the regions that have experienced the highest pace of outmigration since then. With the exception of the increasing popularity of the Berlin region, the distribution of East to West migrants across West Germany is fairly stable over time: migrants continue to favor the large industrial provinces of Baden-Wuerttemberg, Bayern, Nordrhein-Westfalen, and Niedersachsen.

http://www.demographic-research.org/

Click on "Enter".
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Urban Institute Reports: Three reports: "An Improved Living Environment? Relocation Outcomes for HOPE VI Relocatees," by Mary Cunningham; "An Improved Living Environment? Housing Quality Outcomes for HOPE VI Relocatees," by Jennifer Comey; and "An Improved Living Environment? Neighborhood Outcomes for HOPE VI Relocatees," by Larry Buron (Metropolitan Housing and Communities Centers Briefs, September 2004,.pdf format, each 7 p.) are linked to from an Urban Institute news release: "Federal Program Leads to Better Homes and Neighborhoods for Public Housing Residents" (Sep. 17, 2004).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=900738
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kaiser Family Foundation Survey Issue Brief: "Children, The Digital Divide, and Federal Policy" (September 2004, .pdf format, 16p., with a survey snapshot, .pdf format, 2p.). "This issue brief, ... includes new research findings and reviews the latest information on wiring the nation's schools and libraries, including points of access, the speed of connection, and what children are doing online. The report also examines current Federal policies and policy ideas that could address the new digital divide. This is the tenth in a series of reports and fact sheets on topics related to children, media and health that pull together the most relevant research on such issues as TV violence, teens online, media ratings, and children and video games."

http://www.kff.org/entmedia/entmedia091604pkg.cfm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

World Bank Development Research Group Report: "How have the world's poorest fared since the early 1980s?" by Shaohua Chen and Martin Ravallion (2004, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

We present new estimates of the extent of the world's progress against poverty. By the frugal 1 dollar per day standard, we find that there were 390 million fewer people living in poverty in 2001 than 20 years earlier. Over the same period,400 million fewer people were poor in China; half of this decline was in the early 1980s. Aggregate gains to the poor elsewhere in the world have roughly balanced the losses. A marked bunching up of people between $1 and $2 per day has emerged over time. If the trends over 1981-2001 continue then the aggregate $1 per day poverty rate for 1990 will be almost halved by 2015, though East and South Asia will be the only regions to more than halve their 1990 poverty rates. Sub- Saharan Africa has emerged as the region with the highest incidence of extreme poverty and the greatest depth of poverty.

http://www.worldbank.org/research/povmonitor/MartinPapers/How_have_the_poorest_fared_since_the_early_1980s.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Center for Social and Economic Modelling (University of Canberra, Australia) Report: "Trends in spatial income inequality, 1996 to 2001," by Ann Harding, Mandy Yap and Rachel Lloyd (September 2004, Report Summary, .pdf format, 2p., with complete postal code breakouts of income data, Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.amp.com.au/au/3column/0,2338,CH5273%255FNI9917%255FSI56,00.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (Vol. 4, No. 38, Sep. 20, 2004). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

Return to top

=========================================================================

WORKING PAPERS:

Penn State Population Research Institute: "The Avoidance of Bias Against Care Giving: The Case of Academic Faculty," by Robert Drago, Carol Colbeck, Dawn Stauffer, Amy Varner, Kurt Burkum, Jennifer Fazioli, Gabriela Guzman, and Tara Habasevich (Working Paper 04-06, August 2004, .pdf format, 38p.).

Abstract:

We analyze bias avoidance behaviors, whereby individuals minimize or hide family commitments to achieve career success. Original survey data from Chemistry and English faculty in 507 U.S. colleges and universities find women more often reporting bias avoidance and the behaviors diffusing over time. Bias avoidance behaviors may help women achieve tenure more quickly although, at the institutional level, the behaviors are negatively related to the attraction and the retention of women.

http://www.pop.psu.edu/general/pubs/working_papers/psu-pri/wp0406.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

University of Texas-Austin Population Research Center:

A. "The impact of health care providers on female sterilization among HIV-positive women in Brazil," by Kristine Hopkins, Regina Maria Barbosa, Daniela Riva Knauth, and Joseph E. Potter (WP 04-05-01, 2004, .pdf format, 25p.).

Abstract:

This paper explores the reproductive preferences and outcomes of HIV-positive women in two cities in Brazil. We used three types of data, all drawn from women who delivered in public sector hospitals: (1) clinical records of 427 HIV-positive women; (2) pre- and postpartum in-depth interviews with 60 HIV-positive women; and (3) a prospective survey carried out among 363 women drawn from the general population. The HIV-positive samples were collected on women who did prenatal care between July 1999 and June 2000, and the general population survey was conducted with women who started prenatal care between April 1998 and June 1999. Among the women in the clinic sample, we found dramatic differences in the proportion sterilized postpartum: 51% in Sao Paulo vs. 4% in Porto Alegre, compared to 3.4% and 1.1%, respectively, of women in the general population. Our qualitative data suggest that HIV-positive women in this study had strong preferences to have no more future children and that female sterilization was the preferred way to achieve this end. Therefore, we conclude that the large difference in rates is mainly due to HIV-positive women's differential access to sterilization in the two settings. In-depth interviews revealed that women in Sao Paulo were often encouraged by clinic staff to be sterilized postpartum. In contrast, HIV-positive women in Porto Alegre clinics were not offered sterilization as an option and those who requested it were repeatedly put off. The striking difference found in the frequency with which doctors provide postpartum sterilization to seropositive women in our study sites deserves attention and discussion in the respective medical communities. At the higher level of national policy on reproductive rights, there may be grounds for reopening discussion about the norms regarding postpartum procedures, and for devoting far more resources to expanding contraceptive options.

B. "Ethnic Choices and the Intergenerational Progress of Mexican Americans," by Brian Duncan and Stephen J. Trejo (WP 04-05-02, 2004, .pdf format, April 2004, .pdf format, 28p.).

Abstract:

Marital relationships, like individuals, follow a developmental trajectory over time--with ups and downs, crises and tragedies, and gains and losses. We work from a life course perspective and use growth curve analysis to look at trajectories of change in marital quality over time. Although the tendency is for marital quality to decline over time, some groups begin with much higher levels of marital quality than others. Moreover, a number of life course and contextual factors can accelerate or slow this path of change. Our findings point to the importance of considering the multi-dimensionality of time (e.g., age, marital duration, the passage of years) as well as family transitions (e.g., having children, emptying or refilling the nest) in creating the meanings and experiences of marriage over time.

Both working papers can be accessed from:

http://www.prc.utexas.edu/working_papers/series_04-05.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Bureau of Economic Research: "The More the Merrier? The Effect of Family Composition on Children's Education," by Sandra E. Black, Paul G. Devereux, and Kjell G. Salvanes (w10720, September 2004, .pdf format, 48p.).

Abstract:

Among the perceived inputs in the production' of child quality is family size; there is an extensive theoretical literature that postulates a trade-off between child quantity and quality within a family. However, there is little causal evidence that speaks to this theory. Our analysis is able to overcome many limitations of the previous literature by using a rich dataset that contains information on the entire population of Norway over an extended period of time and allows us to match adult children to their parents and siblings. In addition, we use exogenous variation in family size induced by the birth of twins to isolate causation. Like most previous studies, we find a negative correlation between family size and children's educational attainment. However, when we include indicators for birth order, the effect of family size becomes negligible. This finding is robust to the use of twin births as an instrument for family size. In addition, we find that birth order has a significant and large effect on children's education; children born later in the family obtain less education. These findings suggest the need to revisit economic models of fertility and child production', focusing not only on differences across families but differences within families as well.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10720

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address for full text.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yale University [New Haven, Connecticut] Economic Growth Center: "Female Household-Headship in Rural Bangladesh: Incidence, Determinants and Impact on Children's Schooling," by Shareen Joshi (Center Discussion Paper 894, September 2004, .pdf format, 48p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses data from Matlab, Bangladesh to examine the characteristics of female-headed households and estimate the impact of female-headship on children's schooling. Female household heads in Matlab fall into two broad groups: widows and married women, most of whom are wives of migrants. These women differ from each other not only in their current socio-economic circumstances, but also in their backgrounds and circumstances prior to getting married. To identify the effects of female-headship on children's outcomes, I use a two-stage least squares strategy that controls for the possible endogeneity of both types of female-headship. Results indicate that children residing in households headed by married women have stronger schooling attainments than children in other households, while children of widows are more likely to work outside the home. The hypothesis of exogeneity of female-headship is rejected in most cases.

http://www.econ.yale.edu/growth_pdf/cdp894.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Urban Institute: "State Policies That Affect Working Families," by Katherin Ross Phillips (Assessing the New Federalism Discussion Paper No. 04-05, August 2004, .pdf format, 50p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311048
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "Measuring the Returns to the GED: Using an Exogenous Change in GED Passing Standards as a Natural Experiment," by Magnus Lofstrom and John Tyler (Discussion Paper 1306, September 2004, .pdf format, 48p.).

Abstract:

In this paper, we exploit an exogenous change in the passing standard required to obtain a General Educational Development (GED) credential to identify the impact of the GED on the quarterly earnings of male dropouts, utilizing the Texas Schools Micro Data Panel (TSMP). These unique data contain demographic and GED test score information from the Texas Education Agency linked to pre- and post-test taking Unemployment Insurance quarterly wage records from the Texas Workforce Commission. Comparing Texas dropouts who acquired a GED before the passing standard was raised in 1997 to dropouts with the same test scores who failed the GED exams after the passing standard hike, we find no evidence of a positive "GED effect" on earnings. The finding of no significant difference in pre-test taking earnings between the treatment and control group support the validity of the natural experiment. Our results are robust to a number of specifications and sub-samples of our general sample population of 16-40 year old males.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1306.pdf

B. "Regional Income Inequality in Selected Large Countries," by Almas Heshmati (Discussion Paper 1307, September 2004, .pdf format, 40p.).

Abstract:

Income inequality can be measured at different levels of aggregation such as global, continental, international and national levels. Here we consider income inequality at the national level but the focus is on the within country regional inequality. Regional inequality in income distribution in a selection of large countries measured by the size of their population and land area with regional, provincial or federation division is examined. The empirical results reported are based on the second half of the 20th century. The countries considered here cover large transition, developing and industrialised countries. The review cover a whole range of measures and methods frequently employed in empirical analysis of income inequality and income distribution. Different determinant factors and their impacts from different studies are presented. Empirical results from the literature is compared with those obtained based on the WIID data covering post 1950.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1307.pdf

C. "Female Breadwinner Families: Their Existence, Persistence and Sources," by Robert Drago, David Black, and Mark Wooden (Discussion Paper 1308, September 2004, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

We develop a typology for understanding couple households where the female is the major earner -- what we term female breadwinner households -- and test it using data from the first two waves of the HILDA Survey. We distinguish temporary from persistent female breadwinner households and hypothesise, and confirm, that these two groups diverge on demographic, socio-economic status (SES), labour market and family commitment characteristics. Among the persistent group we further distinguish those couples where the dominance of a female earner is related to economic factors and those where it appears associated with a purposeful gender equity strategy. We again hypothesise and confirm that these household types significantly diverge, finding that men in the economic group exhibit low SES, poor labour market position, and low levels of commitment to family, while both the women and men in the equity type often achieve positive outcomes regarding gender equity and economic and family success.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1308.pdf

D. "The Brain Drain: Some Evidence from European Expatriates in the United States," by Gilles Saint-Paul (Discussion Paper 1310, September 2004, .pdf format, 16p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses U.S. Census data from 1990 and 2000 to provide evidence on the labor market characteristics of European-born workers living in the US. It is found that there is a positive wage premium associated with these workers, and that the highly skilled are over-represented compared with the source country, more so when one moves up the skill ladder.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1310.pdf

E. "Jobs for Young University Graduates: Is It Worth Having a Degree?" by Ana Rute Cardoso (Discussion Paper 1311, September 2004, .pdf format, 18p.).

Abstract:

This study addresses the question: Are workers who hold a university degree increasingly filling job openings meant for people with lower levels of schooling? It focuses on Portugal, where the higher education system has been expanding at a fast pace and the share of university graduates in total labour force has been increasing, but where the unemployment rate for such workers has also been increasing. The analysis relies on a remarkable dataset covering the entire workforce in manufacturing and services private sectors, to implement the conceptual framework developed by Gottschalk and Hansen (2003). Results indicate that the university wage premium increased and the proportion of university graduates working in non-university jobs declined sharply over time. Therefore, no support is found for the skepticism over investment in higher education. Results are consistent with the idea that skill-biased technological progress taking place in some sectors raises the productivity of workers with higher schooling levels, thus raising their wages, which attracts new workers with high qualifications.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1311.pdf

F. "The Dynamic Impact of Immigration on Natives' Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Israel," by Sarit Cohen-Goldner and Daniele Paserman (Discussion Paper 1315, September 2004, .pdf format, 38p.).

Abstract:

This paper studies the dynamic impact of mass migration from the Former Soviet Union to Israel on natives' labor market outcomes. Specifically, we attempt to distinguish between the short-run and long-run effects of immigrants on natives' wages and employment. The transition of immigrants into a new labor market is a gradual process: the dynamics of this process come from immigrants' occupational mobility and from adjustments by local factors of production. Natives may therefore face changing labor market conditions, even years after the arrival of the immigrants. If immigrants are relatively good substitutes for native workers, we expect that the impact of immigration will be largest immediately upon the immigrants' arrival, and may become smaller as the labor market adjusts to the supply shock. Conversely, if immigrants upon arrival are poor substitutes for natives because of their lack of local human capital, the initial effect of immigration is small, and the effect increases as immigrants acquire local labor market skills and compete with native workers. We empirically examine these alternative hypotheses using data from Israel~Rs Labor Force and Income Surveys from 1989 to 1999. We find that wages of both men and women are negatively correlated with the fraction of immigrants with little local experience in a given labor market segment. A 10 percent increase in the share of immigrants lowers natives' wages in the short run by 1 to 3 percent, but this effect dissolves after 4 to 7 years. This result is robust to a variety of different segmentations of the labor market, to the inclusion of cohort effects, and to different dynamic structures in the residual term of the wage equation. On the other hand, we do not find any effect of immigration on employment, neither in the short nor in the long run.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1315.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

European Union: "Coordinated and Integrated Approach to Combat HIV/AIDS Within the European Union and in its Neighborhood" (European Commission, 2004, .pdf format, 18p.).

http://europa.eu.int/comm/health/ph_threats/com/aids/docs/ev_20040916_rd01_en.pdf
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

World Bank Development Research Group: "China's (Uneven) Progress Against Poverty," by Shaohua Chen, and Martin Ravallion (WP 3408, September 2004, .pdf format, 57p.).

Abstract:

While the incidence of extreme poverty in China fell dramatically over 1980-2001, progress was uneven over time and across provinces. Rural areas accounted for the bulk of the gains to the poor, though migration to urban areas helped. The pattern of growth mattered. Rural economic growth was far more important to national poverty reduction than urban economic growth. Agriculture played a far more important role than the secondary or tertiary sources of GDP. Rising inequality within the rural sector greatly slowed poverty reduction. Provinces starting with relatively high inequality saw slower progress against poverty, due both to lower growth and a lower growth elasticity of poverty reduction. Taxation of farmers and inflation hurt the poor. External trade had little short-term impact.

http://econ.worldbank.org/view.php?topic=19&type=5&id=38741

Return to top

=========================================================================

JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "browse by publication"
C. Click the "fax/ariel" radio button, type the Journal Name in the "by words in the title" search box and click "search".
D. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

Journal of Biosocial Science (Vol. 36, No. 5, 2004)

Journal of Human Resources (Vol. 39, No. 3, 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Other Journals

American Journal of Sociology (Vol. 110, No. 2, September 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJS/journal/contents/v110n2.html

Return to top

=========================================================================

INSTITUTES/CALLS FOR PAPERS:

Johns Hopkins Fall Institute in Health Policy: "The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Public Health Agency of the Municipality of Barcelona, Spain, with the collaboration of the Universitat Pompeu Fabra, are pleased to announce the establishment of the first annual John Hopkins Fall Institute in Health Policy. The Institute, jointly sponsored by the world-renowned John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Public Health Agency of the Municipality of Barcelona, one of the major public health research agencies in Europe, is dedicated to training health professionals and public health practitioners by strengthening their public health knowledge and skills. Courses will be held at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra, a leading academic center in Europe, November 15-27, 2004 in Barcelona Spain." For more information see:

http://www.jhsph.edu/Dept/HPM/Non_Degree/institutes/index.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

UN Development Program/UN Population Fund/World Health Organization/World Bank Call for Papers: "Call For Papers on Quality of Care in Reproductive Health in Developing Countries" More information can be found at the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP) Calls for Papers and Meetings under the title listed above.

http://www.iussp.org/Announcements/9calls.php

Return to top

=========================================================================

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

Foundation for Child Development Young Scholars Program: "The Foundation for Child Development is providing fellowships, Changing Faces of America's Children -- Young Scholars Program. This work is a special component of the New American Children Program. Basic information about the developmental characteristics and needs of the nation's fastest growing child population -- immigrant children -- remains sparse. The FCD fellowship supports young scholars with their research in identifying and understanding the challenges faced by immigrant children and their families." For more information see:

http://www.fcd-us.org/ourwork/y-index.html

Return to top

=========================================================================

DATA:

Census Bureau: "America's Families and Living Arrangements: 2003" (Microsoft Excel, .pdf, and comma separated value [.csv] format). These tables are taken from the 2003 March Current Population Survey.

http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/hh-fam/cps2003.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

IPUMS Revisions: The Integrated Public Use Microdata Series at the University of Minnesota announced the following revision Sep. 13, 2004: "Posted new versions of the 2000 1% and 5% samples, and the 2000-2002 ACS samples. The following variables were improved: OCC1950, SEI, OCCSCORE, and IND1950. The new variables utilize the Census Bureau's recently published occupation and industry crosswalks between the 1990 and 2000 censuses." For more on revisions and links to data see:

http://www.ipums.org/usa/revisions.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Current Population Survey, August 2002: Public Participation in the Arts Supplement (#3971)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03971.xml

Current Population Survey, January 2000: Tobacco Use Supplement (#4041)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04041.xml

Current Population Survey, May 2000: Tobacco Use Supplement (#4042)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04042.xml

Current Population Survey, June 2001: Tobacco Use Supplement (#4043)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04043.xml

Firearm Injury Surveillance Study, 1993-2002: [United States] (#4083)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04083.xml
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

International Social Survey Program: German Social Science Infrastructure Services (GESIS) announced "ISSP 2002 "Family and Gender Roles III" available for ordering: The international data set for the ISSP module 2002 "Family and Gender Roles" can now be ordered. These new data contain the third replication of the "Family and Gender" topic, after 1988 and 1994! The ISSP 2002 data set (ZA No. 3880) comes on a CD together with most previous ISSP modules (except those from 1997, 1999 and 2001)." Also: "ISSP 2004 "Citizenship" setup file: The standard setup for the ISSP module of 2004 is now available. Member countries that have already fielded the study can use the setup file to prepare their data deliveries to the Archive." For more information see:

http://www.gesis.org/en/data_service/issp/news.htm

Return to top

Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu