Current Demographic Research Report #35, June 7, 2004.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Reports
Centers for Disease Control Periodical
National Center for Health Statistics Reports
National Cancer Institute Compendium
National Academies Press Monograph
National Center for Education Statistics Report
Department of Housing and Urban Development Periodical
USDA Economic Research Service Periodical Articles, Reports
World Health Organization Report
Urban Institute Report
Kaiser Family Foundation Report
Roper Center Public Opinion Matters
Chronic Poverty Research Center Report
Reuters Health Article
_Science_ Article Abstract
_Journal of the American Medical Association_ Theme Issue Info Health Pop. Reporter
NLS Bibliography Updates

WORKING PAPERS

Census Bureau
National Bureau of Economic Research
CESifo
University of Bristol Economics Department
University of Bristol Leverhulme Centre For Market And Public Organisation
Institute for the Study of Labor

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta
Other Journals

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Roper Center

DATA

Department of Housing and Urban Development/Census Bureau
Department of Housing and Urban Development
National Center for Education Statistics
US Department of Agriculture
Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research

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REPORTS, ARTICLES, NEWS RELEASES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Reports:

A. "Evidence From Census 2000 About Earnings by Detailed Occupation for Men and Women," by Daniel H. Weinberg (Census 2000 Special Reports CENSR-15, May 2004, .pdf format, 28p.). The report, along with links to three tables (.pdf, Microsoft Excel and comma separated value [.csv] format, is linked to from a Census Bureau news release: "Census Bureau Analyzes Earnings by Men and Women in 505 Jobs" (CB04-88, Jun. 2, 2004).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/census_2000/001833.html

Click on "Evidence From Census 2000 About Earnings by Detailed Occupation for Men and Women" for link to full text. Click on "Detailed Tables" for link to tables.

B. "A Profile of Older Workers in California," by Nick Carroll and Cynthia Taeuber (Local Employment Dynamics LED/OW-CA, May 2003, .pdf format, 22p.). The report is linked to from a Census Bureau news release: "As It Ages, California's Work Force Remains on the Job" (CB04-86, Jun. 2, 2004).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/aging_population/001831.html

Click on "A Profile of Older Workers in California" for link to full text.
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Centers for Disease Control Periodical: "Cancer Mortality Surveillance --- United States, 1990--2000," by Sherri L. Stewart, Jessica B. King, Carol Friedman (_Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_ Surveillance Summaries Vol. 53, No. SS-3, June 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 108p.).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5303a1.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/ss/ss5303.pdf
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National Center for Health Statistics Reports:

A. "Joint Canada-United States Survey of Health (JCUSH)," by Claudia Sanmartin, Edward Ng, Debra Blackwell, Jane Gentleman, Michael Martinez and Catherine Simile (Statistics Canada/National Center for Health Statistics, June 2004, .pdf format, 32p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/04news/firstjointsurvey.htm

CDC press release: "First Joint Survey of Health in Canada and the United States Shows Both Countries Report High Level of Health" (Jun. 2, 2004).

http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/r040602.htm

B. "Deaths, Injuries, 2001," by by Robert N. Anderson, Arialdi M. Minino, Lois A. Fingerhut, Margaret Warner, and Melissa A. Heinen (National Vital Satistics Reports Vol. 52, No. 21, June 2004, .pdf format, 88p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr52/nvsr52_21acc.pdf
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National Cancer Institute Compendium: "SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2001" (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program, June 2004, HTML and .pdf format). "The SEER Cancer Statistics Review (CSR), a report of the most recent cancer incidence, mortality, survival, and prevalence statistics, is published annually by the Cancer Statistics Branch of the NCI. The scope and purpose of this work are consistent with a report to the Senate Appropriations Committee (Breslow, 1988) which recommended that a broad profile of cancer be presented to the American public on a routine basis. This edition includes incidence, mortality, survival, and prevalence statistics from 1975 through 2001, the most recent year for which data are available."

http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2001/

National Institutes of Health News Release: "Annual Report to the Nation Finds Cancer Incidence and Death Rates on the Decline: Survival Rates Show Significant Improvement" (Jun. 3, 2004).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/jun2004/nci-03.htm
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National Academies Press Monograph: "On Evaluating Curricular Effectiveness: Judging the Quality of K-12 Mathematics Evaluations" (Committee for a Review of the Evaluation Data on the Effectiveness of NSF-Supported and Commercially Generated Mathematics Curriculum Materials, National Research Council, 2004, OpenBook format, 281p.). Note: Ordering information for the print copy is available at the site.

http://www.nap.edu/catalog/11025.html
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National Center for Education Statistics Report: "Full-day and Half-day Kindergarten in the United States: Findings from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99," by Jill Walston and Jerry West (NCES 2004078, June 2004, .pdf format, 131p.).

Abstract:

This report describes public and private kindergarten in the United States. It includes information about the schools that offer full-day and half-day kindergarten and the children who attend these programs. The composition and structure of public school full-day and half-day kindergarten classes and the instructional practices used by teachers in these classes are described. The report concludes with an analysis of the cognitive gains of public school children who attend full-day and half-day programs.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2004078
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Department of Housing and Urban Development Periodical: _U.S. Housing Market Conditions_ (1st Quarter 2004, June 2004, .pdf format). "U.S. Housing Market Conditions, published quarterly, is a compilation of statistical data and written reports. Tabular data indicate market conditions on the national level and are presented for each quarter. Historical data are also presented in summary tables. Overviews of economic and housing market trends are presented for ten geographical regions, the report for each of which includes a profile on a selected housing market. Each issue includes a summary of the overall trends in national housing and a topical piece that describes a particular, noteworthy aspect of housing activity."

http://www.huduser.org/periodicals/ushmc.html
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US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Periodical Articles, Reports:

A. The latest issue of _Amber Waves_ (June 2004), ERS' monthy magazine on the economics of food, farming, natural resources, and rural America contains the following articles, which may be of interest to researchers in demography. They are: "Where Will Demographics Take the Asia-Pacific Food System?" by William Coyle, Brad Gilmour, and Walter J. Armbruster;"Emergency Providers Help Poor Households Put Food on the Table," by Laura Tiehen, and "Rural Hispanics: Employment and Residential Trends," by William Kandel and Constance Newman (all articles HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.ers.usda.gov/AmberWaves/June04/

B. Data Development Initiatives for Research on Food Assistance and Nutrition Programs: "Investments in new and improved data resources have the potential to improve the usefulness and cost-effectiveness of research on Federal food assistance and nutrition programs. Data development initiatives in this series of reports address research and program information needs for the Food Stamp Program, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), and the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. The reports provide specific implementation plans for the initiatives and discuss potential costs, benefits, and alternatives." Reports in the series are:

"Linking the Current Population Survey to State Food Stamp Program Administrative Data: Phase II Report, Data Development Initiatives for Research on Food Assistance and Nutrition Programs--Final Report," by David Wittenburg and Don Alderson (Food Assistance and Nutrition Resarch EFAN04005-1, June 2004, .pdf format, 67p.).

http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/efan04005/efan04005-1/

"Establishing a Web-Based Data Collection System for National School Lunch and National School Breakfast Program Data: Technical Report," by Loren Bell, Anne Kenyon, Todd Heinrich, and Dea Zullo (Food Assistance and Nutrition Resarch EFAN04005-3, June 2004, .pdf format, 50p.).

http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/efan04005/efan04005-3/

"Linking WIC Program Data to Medicaid and Vital Records Data: Phase II Report, Data Development Initiatives for Research on Food Assistance and Nutrition Programs--Final Report," by Loren Bell (Food Assistance and Nutrition Resarch EFAN04005-2, June 2004, .pdf format, 101p.).

http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/efan04005/efan04005-2/

C."WIC and the Retail Price of Infant Formula," by Victor Oliveira, Mark Prell, David Smallwood, and Elizabeth Frazao (Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Report No. FANRR39, June 2004, .pdf format, 98p.).

Abstract:

Rebates from infant formula manufacturers to State agencies that administer the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) support over one-quarter of all WIC participants. However, concerns have been raised that WIC and its infant formula rebate program may significantly affect the infant formula prices faced by non-WIC consumers. This report presents findings from the most comprehensive national study of infant formula prices at the retail level. For a given set of wholesale prices, WIC and its infant formula rebate program resulted in modest increases in the supermarket price of infant formula, especially in States with a high percentage of WIC formula-fed infants. However, lower priced infant formulas are available to non-WIC consumers in most areas of the country, and the number of these lower priced alternatives is increasing over time.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/FANRR39/
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World Health Organization Report: "Young peoples health in context. Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study: international report from the 2001/2002 survey," edited by Candace Currie, Chris Roberts, Antony Morgan, Rebecca Smith, Wolfgang Settertobulte, Oddrun Samdal and Vivian Barnekow Rasmussen (Health Policy for Children and Adolescents, No. 4, .pdf format, 237p. The report is linked to from a WHO news release: "New report spotlights risks to young people's health (EURO/06/04, Jun. 3, 2004).

http://www.euro.who.int/mediacentre/PR/2004/20040603_1

Links are on right side of page.
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Urban Institute Report: "Squeezing SCHIP: States Use Flexibility to Respond to the Ongoing Budget Crisis," by Ian Hill, Holly Stockdale and Brigette Courtot (New Federalism: Issues and Options for States A-65, June 2004, .pdf format, 11p.). "Interviews with SCHIP administrators in 13 states indicate that cuts to SCHIP in FY 2003 were more widespread than in 2002. Virtually all states reduced or eliminated outreach activities. Four states either froze enrollment or reduced eligibility thresholds. Half the states raised premiums and copayments for program participants. Five states either froze or cut provider reimbursement. Compared with other areas in state budgets, SCHIP cuts state officials universally described as among the smallest, and last, to be adopted, reflecting policymakers' strong support of the program. In addition, most states continued to simplify enrollment, and generous benefits were maintained in all but two states. Despite the deeper cuts, states' capacity to insure children remains much stronger than before the creation of SCHIP in 1997."

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311015
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Kaiser Family Foundation Report: "Survey of Americans on HIV/AIDS - Part One: Global HIV/AIDS" (June 2004, summary and chartpack, .pdf format, 23p., toplines, .pdf format, 16p.). "These survey findings of Americans' views on global HIV/AIDS are part of Kaiser's national "Survey of Americans on HIV/AIDS," conducted in spring 2004. Other portions of the national survey will be released this summer. This portion of the survey explores such issues as foreign aid, general knowledge about the global epidemic and the role of the United States, as well as which individuals are associated with the fight against global HIV/AIDS and where Americans get information about the issue."

http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/pomr060204pkg.cfm
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Roper Center [University of Connecticut] Public Opinion Matters: This months POM topic is "Public Opinion on Neighbors to the North and South." Included are relevant selected responses to poll questions and selected articles of interest.

http://www.ropercenter.uconn.edu/cgi-bin/hsrun.exe/roperweb/pom/pom.htx;start=HS_special_topics?Topic=neighbors
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Chronic Poverty Research Center Report: "Chronic Poverty Report--2004-05" (2004, .pdf format, 140p.).

http://www.chronicpoverty.org/cprcaboutCPR.htm

Click on "Go to report contents" for link to full text.

More information on CPRC:

http://www.chronicpoverty.org/aboutus.htm
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Reuters Health Article: "Junk food one-third of U.S. diet, study finds" (Reuters Health, Jun. 2, 2004).

http://www.reutershealth.com/archive/2004/06/02/eline/links/20040602elin003.html
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_Science_ Article Abstract: "What If We Give a Census and No One Comes?" by Kenneth Prewitt (_Science_, Vol. 304, No. 5676, Jun. 4, 2004, p. 1452-1453)

http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/summary/304/5676/1452
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_Journal of the American Medical Association_ Theme Issue: _JAMA_, Vol. 291, No. 21, Jun. 2, 2004, is a special theme issue: "Global Health." Abstracts are available to the public. Check your organization's library for electronic availability of full text.

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/291/21/2519
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Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (Vol. 4, No. 23, Jun. 7, 2004). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/
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NLS Bibliography Updates: Note: These citations, along with all of the NLS bibliography, can be found at:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/

Note: Where available, direct links to full text have been provided. These references represent updated citations from Jun. 1, 2004 - Jun. 4, 2004.

CAWLEY, JOHN
The Impact of Obesity on Wages
The Journal of Human Resources
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4584
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press

AUGHINBAUGH, ALISON AILEEN
The Impact of Attrition on the Children of the NLSY79
The Journal of Human Resources
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
ID Number: 4585
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press

ANTECOL, HEATHER
BEDARD, KELLY
The Racial Wage Gap: The Importance of Labor Force Attachment Differences across Black, Mexican and White Men
The Journal of Human Resources
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4586
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press

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WORKING PAPERS:

Census Bureau: "Evaluation of April 1, 2000 School District Population Estimates Based on the Synthetic Ratio Method," by Monique Oosse (Working Paper 74, June 2004, HTML format with tables in Microsoft Excel and .pdf format).

http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0074/twps0074.html
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National Bureau of Economic Research:

A. "The Role of Public Health Improvements in Health Advances: The 20th Century United States," by David M. Cutler and Grant Miller (w10511, May 2004, .pdf format, 50p.).

Abstract:

Mortality rates in the US fell more rapidly during the late 19th and early 20th Centuries than any other period in American history. This decline coincided with an epidemiological transition and the disappearance of a mortality "penalty" associated with living in urban areas. There is little empirical evidence and much unresolved debate about what caused these improvements, however. This paper investigates the causal influence of clean water technologies -- filtration and chlorination -- on mortality in major cities during the early 20th Century. Plausibly exogenous variation in the timing and location of technology adoption is used to identify these effects, and the validity of this identifying assumption is examined in detail. We find that clean water was responsible for nearly half of the total mortality reduction in major cities, three-quarters of the infant mortality reduction, and nearly two-thirds of the child mortality reduction. Rough calculations suggest that the social rate of return to these technologies was greater than 23 to 1 with a cost per life-year saved by clean water of about $500 in 2003 dollars. Implications for developing countries are briefly considered.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10511

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

B. "The Role of Immigration in Dealing with the Developed World's Demographic Transition," by Hans Fehr, Sabine Jokisch, and Laurence Kotlikoff (w10512, May 2004, .pdf format, 40p.).

Abstract:

This paper and its companion study, Fehr, Jokisch, and Kotlikoff (2004), develop a three-region dynamic general equilibrium life-cycle model to analyze general and skill-specific immigration policy during the demographic transition. The three regions are the U.S., Japan, and the EU. Immigration is often offered as a solution to the remarkable again underway in the developed world. Absent an immediate and dramatic change in immigration, dependency ratios will roughly double over the next three decades placing fiscal institutions, in particular, and economies, in general, under enormous stress. Can immigration alleviate these stresses? The answer is unclear because a number of offsetting factors are at play. First, increased immigration raises the size of the labor force, but also lowers real wages. Hence, the increase in the taxable wage base due to immigration will be less than might otherwise be expected. Second, immigrants arrive with some capital and accumulate more capital as they age. This raises labor productivity and both payroll and income tax bases. Third, immigrants, like natives, require public goods and become eligible for government welfare, health care, and pension benefits. Fiscally speaking, how much one earns' from a new immigrant depends on the immigrant's skill level, which, in turn, determines the immigrant's level of earnings. The reason is that taxes and transfer payments are, in general, collected and distributed on a progressive basis. Consequently, high-skilled immigrants deliver a larger bang for the buck when it comes to paying net taxes (taxes paid net of transfer payments received). Our model confirms this point. Nonetheless, its findings, even with respect to high-skilled immigration, which we investigate in detail in this paper, are not pretty. It shows that a significant expansion of immigration, whether across all skill groups or among particular skill groups, will do remarkably little to alter the major capital shortage, tax hikes, and reductions in real wages that can be expected along the demographic transition.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10512

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

C. "The Impact of Education on Fertility and Child Mortality: Do Fathers Really Matter Less Than Mothers?" by Lucia Breierova and Esther Duflo (w10513, May 2004, .pdf format, 32p.).

Abstract:

This paper takes advantage of a massive school construction program that took place in Indonesia between 1973 and 1978 to estimate the effect of education on fertility and child mortality. Time and region varying exposure to the school construction program generates instrumental variables for the average education in the household, and the difference in education between husband and wife. We show that female education is a stronger determinant of age at marriage and early fertility than male education. However, female and male education seem equally important factors in reducing child mortality. We suggest that the OLS estimate of the differential effect of women's and men's education may be biased by failure to take in to account assortative matching.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10513

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

D. "HIV Breakthroughs and Risky Sexual Behavior," by Dana Goldman, Darius Lakdawalla, and Neeraj Sood (w10516, May 2004, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

Recent breakthroughs in the treatment of HIV have coincided with an increase in infection rates and an eventual slowing of reductions in HIV mortality. These trends may be causally related, if treatment improves the health and functional status of HIV+ individuals and allows them to engage in more sexual risk-taking. We examine this hypothesis empirically using access to health insurance as an instrument for treatment status. We find that treatment results in more sexual risk-taking by HIV+ adults, and possibly more of other risky behaviors like drug abuse. This relationship implies that breakthroughs in treating an incurable disease like HIV can increase precautionary behavior by the uninfected and thus reduce welfare. We also show that, in the presence of this effect, treatment and prevention are social complements for incurable diseases, even though they are substitutes for curable ones. Finally, there is less under-provision of treatment for an incurable disease than a curable one, because of the negative externalities associated with treating an incurable disease.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10516

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

E. "The Effect of Adolescent Experience on Labor Market Outcomes: The Case of Height," by Nicola Persico, Andrew Postlewaite, and Dan Silverman (w10522, May 2004, .pdf format, 41p.).

Abstract:

Taller workers receive a wage premium. Net of differences in family background, the disparity is similar in magnitude to the race and gender gaps. We exploit variation in an individual's height over time to explore how height affects wages. Controlling for teen height essentially eliminates the effect of adult height on wages for white males. The teen height premium is not explained by differences in resources or endowments. The teen height premium is partly mediated through participation in high school sports and clubs. We estimate the monetary benefits of a medical treatment for children that increases height.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10522

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

F. "Identifying the Effects of the Americans with Disabilities Act Using State-Law Variation: Preliminary Evidence on Educational Participation Effects," by Christine Jolls (w10528, May 2004, .pdf format, 16p.).

Abstract:

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) broadly prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in employment and other settings. Several empirical studies have suggested that employment levels of individuals with disabilities declined rather than increased after the ADA's passage. This paper provides a first look at whether lower disabled employment levels after the ADA might have resulted from increased participation in educational opportunities by individuals with disabilities as a rational response to the ADA's employment protections. The main empirical finding is that individuals with disabilities who were not employed in the years following legal innovation in the form of the ADA were more likely than their pre-ADA counterparts to give educational participation as their reason for not being employed. This preliminary evidence suggests the value of further study, with better education data, of the relationship between the ADA's enactment and disabled participation in educational opportunities.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10528

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

G. "International Migration in the Long-Run: Positive Selection, Negative Selection and Policy," by Timothy J. Hatton and Jeffrey G. Williamson (w10529, May 2004, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

Most labor scarce overseas countries moved decisively to restrict their immigration during the first third of the 20th century. This autarchic retreat from unrestricted and even publicly-subsidized immigration in the first global century before World War I to the quotas and bans introduced afterwards was the result of a combination of factors: public hostility towards new immigrants of lower quality public assessment of the impact of those immigrants on a deteriorating labor market, political participation of those impacted, and, as a triggering mechanism, the sudden shocks to the labor market delivered by the 1890s depression, the Great War, postwar adjustment and the great depression. The paper documents the secular drift from very positive to much more negative immigrant selection which took place in the first global century after 1820 and in the second global century after 1950, and seeks explanations for it. It then explores the political economy of immigrant restriction in the past and seeks historical lessons for the present.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10529

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

H. "The Economic Aftermath of the 1960s Riots: Evidence from Property Values," by William J. Collins and Robert A. Margo (w10493, May 2004, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

In the 1960s numerous cities in the United States experienced violent, race-related civil disturbances. Although social scientists have long studied the causes of the riots, the consequences have received much less attention. This paper examines census data from 1950 to 1980 to measure the riots' impact on the value of central-city residential property, and especially on black-owned property. Both ordinary least squares and two-stage least squares estimates indicate that the riots depressed the median value of black-owned property between 1960 and 1970, with little or no rebound in the 1970s. Analysis of household-level data suggests that the racial gap in the value of property widened in riot-afflicted cities during the 1970s.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w10493

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

I. "Education, Work, and Crime: A Human Capital Approach," by Lance Lochner (w10478, May 2004, .pdf format, 43p.).

Abstract:

This paper develops a model of crime in which human capital increases the opportunity cost of crime from foregone work and expected costs associated with incarceration. Older, more intelligent, and more educated adults should commit fewer street (unskilled) crimes. White collar crimes decline less (or increase) with age and education. Predictions for age-crime and education-crime relationships receive broad empirical support in self-report data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and arrest data from the Uniform Crime Reports. The effects of education, training, and wage subsidies, as well as enforcement policies on criminal behavior are discussed.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w10478
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CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and the Ifo Institute for Economic Research) [University of Munich, Germany]: "Implications of EU Accession for International Migration: An Assessment of Potential Migration Pressure," by Anzelika Zaiceva (Working Paper 1184, May 2004, .pdf format, 22p.).

Abstract:

This paper estimates the potential migration from eight EU accession countries as well as Bulgaria and Romania as a result of the eastern enlargement. The experience of migration from Greece, Portugal and Spain is used to estimate the parameters of a migration function, exploiting panel estimation techniques. The results from the models are then used for so-called double out of sample extrapolations - for ten countries that are not within the estimated sample and for the time period in the future. It was found that potential migration flows from central and eastern Europe will be modest. Moreover, legal introduction of free movement of workers seems not to increase migration significantly, contrary to what one might expect.

http://ideas.repec.org/p/ces/ceswps/_1184.html

Click on "download the selected file" at the bottom of the abstract for full text.
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University of Bristol [UK] Economics Department: "Inequality in Infant Survival Rates in India: Identification of State-Dependence Effects," by Wiji Arulampalam and Sonia Bhalotra (Discussion Paper 04/558, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

Data from a number of regions indicate that childhood deaths are unequally distributed across families. This has been identified, in previous research, with (observed and unobserved) heterogeneity between families. In this paper, we investigate whether, on top of these correlated risks, there is a causal process at work within families, whereby the death of a child elevates the risk of death of the succeeding sibling. Borrowing language from the unemployment literature, the causal process is termed state dependence or scarring. To the extent that scarring exists, a social multiplier comes into play, raising the payoff to policies that reduce infant mortality. Acknowledging scarring effects is also potentially relevant to understanding the relation of mortality and fertility behaviour within families. The analysis is conducted using data for the 15 major states of India. Large scarring effects are observed in 14 of the 15 states.

http://econpapers.hhs.se/paper/briuobdis/04_2F558.htm

Click on "http://www.bris.ac.u ... pdffiles/dp04558.pdf" under "Downloads" at the bottom of the abstract for full text.
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University of Bristol [UK] Leverhulme Centre For Market And Public Organisation (LMPO): "Parallel lives? Ethnic segregation in the playground and the neighbourhood," by Simon Burgess, Deborah Wilson and Ruth Lupton (Working Paper 04/094, .pdf format, 50p.).

Abstract:

We provide evidence on the extent of ethnic segregation experienced by children across secondary schools and neighbourhoods (wards). Using 2001 Schools Census and Population Census data we employ the indices of dissimilarity and isolation and compare patterns of segregation across nine ethnic groups, and across Local Education Authorities in England. Looking at both schools and neighbourhoods, we find high levels of segregation for the different groups, along with considerable variation across England. We find consistently higher segregation for South Asian pupils than for Black pupils. For most ethnic groups children are more segregated in the playground than in their neighbourhood. We analyse the relative degree of segregation and show that high population density is associated with high relative school segregation.

http://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/CMPO/workingpapers/wp94.pdf
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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: "Are Asian Migrants Discriminated Against in the Labour Market? A Case Study of Australia," by Pramod N. (Raja) Junankar, Satya Paul, and Wahida Yasmeen (Discussion Paper No. 1167, June 2004, .pdf format, 38p.).

Abstract:

This paper explores the issue of discrimination against Asian migrants in the Australian labour market using a unique panel data set, the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Australia (LSIA). This paper estimates models of the probability of being unemployed for Asian and non-Asian migrants controlling for various characteristics including age, education, and English language ability. More importantly, we control for the visa status of the migrants. Our results suggest that there are significant "unexplained differences" for males that may be ascribed to"discrimination" against Asian migrants. However, the results for females are mixed: the evidence suggests that Asian females do worse than non-Asian females only in the first year after arrival.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1167.pdf

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "browse by publication"
C. Click the "fax/ariel" radio button, type the Journal Name in the "by words in the title" search box and click "search".
D. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

American Sociological Review (Vol. 69, No. 2, April 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

Health and Social Work (Vol. 29, No. 2, 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

Journal of Biosocial Science (Vol. 36, No. 3, 2004).

Sociological Methods and Research (Vol. 32, No. 4, 2004)
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Other Journals:

Public Opinion Quarterly (Vol. 68, No. 1, Spring 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.poq.oupjournals.org/content/vol68/issue1/index.shtml

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

Roper Center [University of Connecticut]: "The Center is seeking a Coordinator of the Data Library to lead the transformation of its digital and paper files to these state-of-the-art data delivery systems. If you are looking for an opportunity to work with dedicated professionals." For more information see:

http://www.ropercenter.uconn.edu/postings/lib_coord.html

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DATA:

Department of Housing and Urban Development/Census Bureau: "2003 American Housing Survey." 2003 microdata (self decompressing [.exe] ASCII and SAS transport format, with self decompressing [.exe] documentation) is available from HUD at:

http://www.huduser.org/datasets/ahs/ahsdata03.html
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Department of Housing and Urban Development: "Low-Income Housing Tax Credits." The LIHTC has been updated as of Jun. 1, 2004. Data is available in dBase format, with documentation in .pdf format).

http://www.huduser.org/datasets/lihtc.html

Click on "Access LIHTC Data or Download Report" for link to data and documentation.
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National Center for Education Statistics:

A. "ECLS-K Third Grade Restricted-Use Child File" (NCES 2003002, June 2004). Note: This is a restricted use data file that requires a restricted use data license.

Abstract:

This CD-ROM contains an electronic code book (ECB), a restricted-use child-level data file, and survey and ECB documentation for the spring third grade wave of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K). All data collected from the sampled children, their parents, teachers, and schools are included.

For more information see:

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2003002

B. "Civics Education Study 1999 (CD-ROM)" (NCES 2002001, June 2004).

Abstract:

The International Comparisons program has released the CIVIC EDUCATION STUDY 1999 (CD-ROM). The Civic Education Study (CivEd), conducted in 1999, provides information on U.S. ninth-graders knowledge about democratic practices and institutions in relationship to students in 27 other participating countries. In addition, CivEd provides data measuring ninth-grade students attitudes toward democracy, national identity, international relations, and social cohesion and diversity. The CD-ROM contains the U.S. national data, Electronic Codebook, and U.S. User's Guide plus materials describing testing, sampling, data collection and data.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2002001
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US Department of Agriculture: "2002 Census of Agriculture." USDA has begun releasing results from the 2002 Census of Agriculture. The first release is "Volume 1 Geographic Area Series," with data at national, state, and county level (ASCII text, .pdf, and .zip compressed comma separated value [.csv] format). Technical documentation and report forms (.pdf format) are available at the site.

http://www.nass.usda.gov/census/
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Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Uniform Crime Reporting Program Data [United States]: Arson, 2002 (#3998)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03998.xml

Uniform Crime Reporting Program Data [United States]: Supplementary Homicide Reports, 2002 (#3999)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03999.xml

Uniform Crime Reporting Program Data [United States]: Offenses Known and Clearances by Arrest, 2002 (#4008)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04008.xml

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu