Current Demographic Research Report #33, May 24, 2004.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Reports, Federal Register Announcement
National Center for Health Statistics Reports, Compendium
Centers for Disease Control Surveillance Summary, News
General Accounting Office Report
National Center for Education Statistics Brochure
Bureau of Labor Statistics Report, Compendium Update
FBI Report
National Science Foundation Report
Department of Housing and Urban Development Periodical
US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Report
Food and Drug Administration News Release
Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) Monograph
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Monograph
United Nations Compendium, Newsletter
_Demographic Research_ Article
Urban Institute Reports
Kaiser Family Foundation Reports
Monitoring the Future Report
Info Health Pop Reporter
NLS Bibliography Updates

WORKING PAPERS

University of Texas-Austin Population Research Center
University of Michigan Population Studies Center
(SUNY) Albany Center for Social and Demographic Analysis
University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta
Other Journals

CONFERENCES

Penn State Population Research Institute
IUSSP

DATA

Census Bureau
National Center for Health Statistics
National Center for Education Statistics
Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Luxembourg Income Study

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REPORTS, ARTICLES, NEWS RELEASES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Reports, Federal Register Announcement:

A. "A Profile of Older Workers in Iowa," by Nick Caroll and Cynthia Taeuber (Local Employment Dynamics LED/OW-IA, May 2004, .pdf format, 22p.). The report is linked to from a Census Bureau news release: "As It Ages, Iowa's Work Force Remains on the Job" (CB04-80, May 13, 2004).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/aging_population/001806.html

Click on "A Profile of Older Workers in Iowa" for link to full text.

B. "A Profile of Older Workers in Missouri," by Nick Carroll and Cynthia Taeuber (Local Employment Dynamics LED/OW-MO, May 2004, .pdf format, 22p.). The Report is linked to from a Census Bureau news release: "As It Ages, Missouri's Work Force Remains on the Job" (CB04-75, May 18, 2004).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/employment_occupations/001815.html

Click on "A Profile of Older Workers in Missouri" for link to full text.

C. "A Profile of Older Workers in New Mexico," by by Nick Carroll and Cynthia Taeuber (Local Employment Dynamics LED/OW-NM, May 2004, .pdf format, 22p.). The Report is linked to from a Census Bureau news release:"New Mexico's Older Work Force Remains on the Job" (CB04-82, May 19, 2004).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/employment_occupations/001817.html

Click on "A Profile of Older Workers in New Mexico" for link to full text.

D. "American Community Survey Current and Proposed Product Review" (Federal Register 3510-07-P).

http://www.census.gov/acs/www/product_review/index.htm

Click on "click here" for Federal Register text.

or:

http://www.census.gov/rdo/www/FRN2010.pdf
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National Center for Health Statistics Reports, Compendium:

A. "2002 National Hospital Discharge Survey," by Carol J. DeFrancis and Margaret J. Hall ( Advance Data From Vital and Health Statistics No. 342, May 2004, .pdf format, 32p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/ad/ad342.pdf

B. "Characteristics of Emergency Departments Serving High Volumes of Safety-net Patients: United States, 2000," by Catherine W. Burke and Irma E. Arispe (Vital and Health Statistics Series 13, No. 155, May 2004, .pdf format, 16p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/04facts/safetynet.htm

Click on "View/download PDF" for full text.

C. _Vital Statistics of the United States, 1996: Volume I, Natality_ (2004, .pdf format).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/datawh/statab/unpubd/natality/natab96.htm
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Centers for Disease Control Surveillance Summary, News : " Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance --- United States, 2003," by Jo Anne Gurnbaum, Laura Kann, Steve Kinchen, James Ross, Joseph Hawkins, Richard Lowry, William A. Harris, Tim McManus, David Chyen,and Janet Collins (_Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report Surveillance Summary, Vol. 53, No. SS-2, HTML and .pdf format, 96p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwr_ss.html

News release:

http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/r040520b.htm
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General Accounting Office Report: "Antibiotic Resistance: Federal Agencies Need to Better Focus Efforts to Address Risk to Humans from Antibiotic Use in Animals" (GAO-04-490, May 2004, .pdf format, 95p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d04490.pdf

Note: This is a temporary address. GAO reports are always available at:

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gaoreports/index.html
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National Center for Education Statistics Brochure: "Nation's Report Card: An Overview of NAEP," by Carol Johnson (NCES 2004552, April 2004, .pdf format, 7p.).

Abstract:

A brochure that describes the purpose of NAEP, and where NAEP fits in with NCES and the NAGB. It describes how NAEP provides assessment results in hard-copy and on-line. The brochure explains how NAEP disseminates information through publications and other information tools. A schedule of NAEP assessments 2002-2012 is also included.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2004552
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Bureau of Labor Statistics Report, Compendium Update:

A. "International Comparisons of Hourly Compensation Costs for Production Workers in Manufacturing, revised data for 2002" (May 2002, ASCII text and .pdf format, 18p.).

http://www.bls.gov/fls/hcompreport.htm

B. _BLS Handbook of Methods_. Chapter 17: "Consumer Price Indexes" (HTML and .pdf format, 107p.) has been updated.

http://www.bls.gov/opub/hom/homch17_itc.htm

Click on "Catalog of PDF files" for link to all _HM_ pdf files. Click on"Handbook Contents" for link to all _HM_ HTML files.
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FBI Report: "Preliminary Annual Uniform Crime Report, January-December, 2003" (Federal Bureau of Investigation, May 2003, .pdf format, 17p.).

http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/ucr.htm

Click on "2003 Preliminary".
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National Science Foundation Report: "Science and Engineering Degrees by Race/Ethnicity of Recipients: 1992-2001, Detailed Statistical Tables (NSF 04-318, May 2004, .pdf and Microsoft Excel format, 99p.).

http://www.nsf.gov/sbe/srs/nsf04318/start.htm

Note: Microsoft Excel tables are available via the HTML link.
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Department of Housing and Urban Development Periodical: _ResearchWorks_ (Vol. 1, No. 3, April/May 2004, .pdf format, 7p.). "ResearchWorks is the official newsletter of U.S. HUD's Office of Policy Development & Research. ResearchWorks includes new publication announcements, relevant case studies, and success stories highlighting the efforts of those who care about housing, and who work to make it more affordable, more accessible, more energy and resource efficient, and above all, more readily available."

http://www.huduser.org/periodicals/Researchworks.html

Click on "Current Issue" for link to full text.
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US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Report: "Moving Public Assistance Recipients Into the Labor Force, 1996-2000," by Kenneth Hanson and Karen S. Hamrick (Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Report FANRR40, May 2004, .pdf format, 41p.).

Abstract:

Moving recipients of public assistance into jobs is a goal of the current system for providing public assistance to low-income households. Using scenario analysis with a computable general equilibrium model, ERS researchers examined some of the labor market impacts of the"welfare-to-work" provisions of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA). The results show that, from 1996 to 2000, the influx of public assistance recipients into the labor force put downward wage pressure on low-skill occupations, making wage growth smaller than it would have been without the influx. At the same time, the influx added workers to the labor force, which contributed to economic growth. By expanding the labor force, the influx contributed 1 percentage point of real economic growth in terms of gross domestic product from 1996 through 2000.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/FANRR40/
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Food and Drug Administration News Release: "FDA Issues Not Approvable Letter to Barr Labs; Outlines Pathway for Future Approval" (P04-53, May 7, 2004).

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/news/2004/NEW01064.html
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Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) Monograph: _Health Personnel Trends in Canada, 1993 to 2002_ (April 2004, .pdf format, 289p.). "This publication contains data on 21 selected health personnel groups. Health professions currently included are: chiropractors, dental hygienists, dentists, dietitians, health records professionals, health service executives, licensed practical nurses (Source: LPNDB at CIHI), medical laboratory technologists, medical radiation technologists, medical physicists, midwives, occupational therapists, optometrists, pharmacists, physicians (Source: SMDB at CIHI), physiotherapists, psychologists, registered nurses (Source: RNDB at CIHI), registered psychiatric nurses (Source: RPNDB at CIHI), respiratory therapists and social workers. For each health personnel group, the standard data tables display 10-years of data by province/territory."

http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/dispPage.jsp?cw_page=PG_69_E&cw_topic=69&cw_rel=AR_21_E

Click on title below "Full Report" at the bottom of the abstract for link to full text.
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Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Monograph: "A Guide to Australian Alcohol Data," (PHE 52, April 2004, .pdf format, 110p.). "This publication identifies and briefly describes key Australian data collections relevant to assessing patterns of alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm. The scope of this list is limited to mostly national data collections in the public domain. This document includes an analysis of these alcohol data collections and how they contribute to reducing alcohol-related harm. The document complements the release of the National Alcohol Research Agenda (NDS 2002), which focuses on research gaps and priorities."

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm?type=detail&id=10002
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United Nations Compendium, Newsletter:

A. _World Fertility Report: 2003_ (Population Division, Division of Economic and Social Affairs, 2004, .pdf format, 504p.).

http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/worldfertility/World_Fertility_Report.htm

B. "United Nations Statistics Newsletter" (Vol. 2, April 2004, .pdf format, 14p.).

http://unstats.un.org/unsd/newsletter/
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_Demographic Research_ Article: Note: _DR_ is " a free, expedited, peer-reviewed journal of the population sciences published by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research [ Rostock, Germany]." "On the tempo and quantum of first marriages in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland: Changes in mean age and variance," by Maria Winkler-Dworak and Henriette Engelhardt (Vol. 10, Article 9, May 2004, .pdf format, p. 232-264).

Abstract:

Period marriage rates have been falling dramatically in most industrial societies since the beginning of the 1970s. As has been shown in the literature, part of this decline is due to the postponement of marriage to later ages. However, the change in variance has been ignored so far. In the case of Austria, Germany, and Switzerland, this paper explores how much of the change in female first marriage rates can be attributed to tempo effects caused by changes in the mean age and variance, and how much of it is due to quantum effects, i.e., the proportion of women who ever marry from 1970 to 2000. In all three countries we find a significant share of the decline in first marriage rates due to tempo distortions, though on different levels.

http://www.demographic-research.org/

Click on "Enter".
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Urban Institute Reports:

A. "Findings and Opportunities: Family Violence in Central New Mexico," by Martha R. Burt, Karin Malm, Cynthia Andrews Scarcella (May 2004, .pdf format, 33p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=410999

Click on "PDF" for full text.

B. "A Decade of HOPE VI: Research Findings and Policy Challenges," by Susan J. Popkin , Bruce Katz , Mary K. Cunningham , Karen D. Brown , Jeremy Gustafson , Margery Austin Turner (May 2004, .pdf format, 62p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411002

Click on "PDF" for full text.

UI News Release: "Successes Warrant HOPE VI's Continuation, Research Record Suggests, but Major Reforms Are Needed" (May 18, 2004).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=900715

C. "Recent Trends in Food Stamp Participation: Have New Policies Made a Difference?" by Sheila R. Zedlewski (New Federalism: National Survey of America's Families B-58, May 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 7p.). "Data from the National Survey of America's Families show that food stamp participation rates increased significantly between 1997 and 2002 for former welfare recipients with monthly incomes below poverty. The participation rates for poor families with children and no welfare experience did not change since 1997. For example, less than one in three families without welfare experience and incomes below one-half the poverty line (two-thirds of all families in this income category) reported receiving food stamps in 2002. This suggests that new food stamp program rules and procedures designed to facilitate access to benefits are only making a difference for families with some connection to the cash welfare system."

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=310995

D. "What Do 'I Do's' Do? Potential Benefits of Marriage for Cohabiting Couples with Children," by Gregory Acs and Sandi Nelson (New Federalism: National Survey of America's Families B-59, May 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 7p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311001
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Kaiser Family Foundation Reports:

A. "National ADAP Monitoring Project, Annual Report, May 2004," by M. Danielle Davis, Chris Aldredge, Murray Penner, Jennifer Kates, Lei Chou, and Daniel Kubert (May 2004, .pdf format, 76p.). "The National ADAP Monitoring Report, 2004 provides the latest data on state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs). ADAPs, authorized under Title II of the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency (CARE) Act, provide HIV/AIDS-related prescription drugs to uninsured and underinsured individuals living with HIV/AIDS. ADAPs operate in 57 U.S. states, territories, and associated jurisdictions. The report, the eighth in an annual series, was prepared by the Kaiser Family Foundation, the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD) and the AIDS Treatment Data Network (ATDN)."

http://www.kff.org/hivaids/hiv051904pkg.cfm

Click on "Report and Executive Summary".

B. "Recent Growth in Medicaid Home and Community-Based Service Waivers," by Heidi Reester, Raad Missmar, and Anne Tumlinson (Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, April 2004, .pdf format, 28p.). "Medicaid spending on home and community-based service (HCBS) waivers dominates spending on community-based long-term care services offered through the Medicaid program. This paper examines trends in HCBS waiver enrollment and spending in recent years."

http://www.kff.org/medicaid/7077-index.cfm

C. "Medicaid and Long-Term Care," by Ellen O'Brien and Risa Elias (Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, May 2004, .pdf format, 24p.)."This report examines Medicaid's role in providing long-term care services, including the services provided, the population needing services, and how the services are delivered. Current policy issues and challenges for Medicaid's role in providing these services are also discussed."

http://www.kff.org/medicaid/7089a.cfm
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Monitoring the Future Report: "Monitoring the Future: National Results on Adolescent Drug Use, Overview of Key Findings 2003," by Lloyd D. Johnston, Patrick M. O'Malley, Jerald G. Bachman, and John E. Schulenberg (University of Michigan Institute for Social Research, June 2004, .pdf format, 59p.). "This report presents a summary of the national results on adolescent drug use, with a particular emphasis on recent trends in the use of licit and illicit drugs."

http://www.monitoringthefuture.org/pubs/monographs/overview2003.pdf
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Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (Vol. 4, No. 21, May 24, 2004). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/
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NLS Bibliography Updates: Note: These citations, along with all of the NLS bibliography, can be found at:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/

Note: Where available, direct links to full text have been provided. These references represent updated citations from May 10, 2004 - May 21, 2004.

BAIRD, CHARDIE L.
REYNOLDS, JOHN R.
Employee Awareness of Family Leave Benefits: The Effects of Family, Work, and Gender
Sociological Quarterly 45,2 (Spring 2004): 325-353.
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 4572
Publisher: University of California Press

Abstract:

The 1993 Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) was intended to help employees meet short-term family demands, such as caring for children and elderly parents, without losing their jobs. However, recent evidence suggests that few women and even fewer men employees avail themselves of family leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act. This paper examines the organizational, worker status, and salience/need factors associated with knowledge of family leave benefits. We study employees covered by the FMLA using the 1996 panel of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to ascertain what work and family factors influence knowledge of leave benefits. Overall, 91 percent of employed FMLA-eligible women report they have access to unpaid family leave, compared to 72 percent of men. Logistic regression analyses demonstrate that work situations more than family situations affect knowledge of family leave benefits and that gender shapes the impact of some work and family factors on awareness. Furthermore, work and family situations do not explain away the considerable gender difference in knowledge of family leave.

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WORKING PAPERS:

University of Texas-Austin Population Research Center:

A. "Effects of family structure on the risk of first premarital birth in the presence of correlated unmeasured family effects," by Daniel A. Powers (WP 03-04-04, April 2004, .pdf format, 38p.).

Abstract:

This paper assesses the effects of family structure on the risk of a first premarital birth for a sample of women from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The sample reflects the family structure and family formation experiences of a cohort of women who were at risk of out of wedlock childbearing during the 1980's and early 1990's. We focus on assessing the effects of family structure in the presence of correlated unmeasured family effects, which are identified through the use of sibling data. The availability of multiple sibling respondents per family permits identification of family-level unobserved heterogeneity in a multi-level context of individuals nested within families. Our models account for family-specific sources of unobserved heterogeneity in the processes generating family structure and nonmarital childbearing, and provide estimates of the association between these sources of unobserved heterogeneity along with the effects of family structure and other covariates. We find that accounting for the correlation between unobserved family-level effects in processes generating family structure and first premarital birth leads to attenuated estimates of the effects family structure on the risk of first premarital birth. This suggests that other family-level factors may play a mediating role in generating both family structure and nonmarital childbearing.

http://www.prc.utexas.edu/working_papers/wp_pdf/03-04-04.pdf

B. "You make me sick: Marital quality and health over the life course," by Debra Umberson, Kristi Williams, Daniel A. Powers, Hui Liu, and Belinda Needham (WP 03-05-05, 2004, .pdf format, 36p.).

Abstract:

Lab-based and clinical studies suggest that poor marital quality can undermine physical health and one recent panel survey of a rural community sample reveals a link between marital quality and self-rated health (Wickrama et al. 1997). We work from a life course perspective and identify several reasons to also expect age and gender differences in the link between marital quality and health. We provide longitudinal evidence from a national probability study that negative aspects of marital quality accelerate the typical decline in physical health trajectories over time in a representative sample of adults. We also find that these adverse effects are greater at older ages. However, the effects of marital quality on health seem to be similar for men and women across the life course.

http://www.prc.utexas.edu/working_papers/wp_pdf/03-04-05.pdf

C. "Bi-racial/ethnic infants and infant mortality in the United States," by Jamie Mihoko Doyle and Robert A. Hummer (WP-03-05-06, 2004, .pdf format, 32p.).

Objective. With the growing number of multirace/ethnic persons in the United States, the validity of using only maternal race/ethnicity to categorize infants in studies of birth outcomes becomes questionable. We examine racial/ethnic disparities in infant mortality risk among bi-racial/ethnic groups as compared to their single-race/ethnic counterparts in the United States using the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Linked Birth/Infant Death files from 1995-1998.

Methods. Logistic regression models estimate infant mortality differentials across groups.

Results. Clear differences in infant mortality risks are apparent by both maternal and paternal race/ethnicity. Some groups of mixed race/ethnic infants experience very low mortality, while others exhibit higher mortality than their single race/ethnic counterparts. Interestingly, infants for whom the race/ethnicity of father is unreported experience the highest risks of death among all combinations.

Conclusion. Both maternal and paternal characteristics, including race/ethnicity, should be considered in studies of infant and child health.

http://www.prc.utexas.edu/working_papers/wp_pdf/03-04-06.pdf
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University of Michigan Population Studies Center: "Tiebout Non-Sorting? Empty-Nest Migration and the Local Fiscal Bundle," by Martin Farnham and Purvi Sevak (PSC Research Report 04-558, May 2004, .pdf format, 40p.).

Abstract:

Using the panel Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and a national panel of local-level fiscal data, we derive a simple test of a lifecycle variant of the Tiebout model. We use a difference-indifference approach to test whether moves by empty-nest households presumed to be out of fiscal equilibrium yield fiscal realignments in the expected direction. We find evidence, controlling for changes in cost of living, location characteristics, and house value, that cross-state, empty-nest movers experience large fiscal gains in the form of reduced exposure to local school spending and declines in property tax liability. These gains are significantly larger than those experienced by cross-state, non-empty-nest movers. By contrast, intrastate empty-nest movers experience little fiscal adjustment, and their degree of adjustment differs little from that of non-empty-nest movers. Together, our findings suggest that while Tiebout's fiscal sorting intuition is upheld at the level of cross-state moves, intrastate movers appear constrained in their fiscal choices and unable to effectively sort. Our findings bring into question the validity of the Tiebout model as a predictor of urban and regional organization and suggest that the efficiency gains from decentralization may be small.

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/papers/rr04-558.pdf
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University at Albany, State University of New York (SUNY) Center for Social and Demographic Analysis: "Mixed Logistic Regressions with Covariate Density Defined Components: Applications to Birth Outcomes," by Timothy B. Gage, Michael J. Bauer, Fu Fang, and Howard Stratton (WP 2004-1, February 2004, .pdf format, 32p.).

The statistical properties of covariate density defined, (CDD) mixtures of logistic regressions as a method of controlling for heterogeneity in infant mortality are explored. Unlike finite mixtures of logistic regressions, the CDD approach is usually identified and is probably generalizable to most regression like procedures. CDD mixtures use the marginal density of a covariate (birth weight in this case) to assign probabalistic (latent) group membership to separate logistic probabilities. The procedure appears to be unbiased, and consistent. A procedure for estimating power is presented. The method identifies significant heterogeneity, which influences birth weight specific infant mortality, and is consistent across populations. This heterogeneity is the proximate cause of the "pediatric paradox", i.e. the finding that low birth weight African American infants have lower infant mortality then European American infants. All of the "paradox" occurs in one subpopulation. Applications with additional covariates could identify the ultimate causes of this heterogeneity.

http://www.albany.edu/csda/2004wp1/2004wp1.pdf
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University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty: "The Role of Food Assistance Programs and Employment Circumstances in Helping Households with Children Avoid Hunger," by Nader S. Kabbani and Myra Yazbeck (Discussion Paper DP-1280-04, May 2004, .pdf format, 60p.).

Abstract:

Households with children in the United States are more likely to experience food insecurity than households with no children. However, households with children are less likely to experience hunger. This finding suggests that food insecure households with children may be drawing on personal and/or public resources to help them avoid hunger. In this paper, we use data from the April Food Security Supplements of the Current Population Survey to evaluate whether federal food assistance programs play a role in helping households with children avoid hunger. The problem of the endogeneity of a household's participation decision is addressed in two ways. First, for the Food Stamp Program, we use exogenous state-level policy variables that affect participation but not food security. Second, for households that experienced hunger during a given year, we study whether participation in any of the three largest federal food assistance programs was associated with lower levels of food insecurity during the last 30 days of that year. The paper also studies whether one personal resource, household employment circumstances, helps households with children avoid hunger. We find that by using better income data from the March Demographic Survey and by using a 10-item adult-referenced food security scale that excludes child-referenced items, we are able to control for the observed differences between households with and without children under 5 years old. For households with school-age children, only participation in the National School Lunch Program appears able to explain why they are able to avoid hunger.

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/irp/pubs/dp128004.pdf
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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: "Russian Cities in Transition: The Impact of Market Forces in the 1990s," by Ira N. Gang and Robert C. Stuart(Discussion Paper DP-1151, May 2004, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract:

This paper analyses Russian city growth during the command and transition eras. Our main focus is on understanding the extent to which market forces are replacing command forces, and the resulting changes in Russian city growth patterns. We examine net migration rates for a sample of 171 medium and large cities for the period 1960 through 2002. We conclude that while the declining net migration rate was reversed during the first half of the 1990s, restrictions continued to matter during the early years of transition in the sense that net migration rates were lower in the restricted than in the unrestricted cities. This pattern seemingly came to an end in the late 1990s.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1151.pdf

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "browse by publication"
C. Click the "fax/ariel" radio button, type the Journal Name in the "by words in the title" search box and click "search".
D. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

Ethnicity and Disease (Vol. 14, No. 2, 2004).

Journal of Political Economy (Vol. 112, No. 2, 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

Journal of Public Health Policy (Vol. 25, No. 1, 2004).

Social Science Journal (Vol. 41, No. 2, 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

Social Science Quarterly (Vol. 85, No. 2, 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.
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Other Journals

American Journal of Epidemiology (Vol. 159, No. 11, Jun. 1, 2004).

http://aje.oupjournals.org/content/vol159/issue11/index.shtml?etoc

The European Journal of Public Health (Vol. 14, No. 2, June 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

http://www3.oup.co.uk/eurpub/hdb/Volume_14/Issue_02/

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CONFERENCES:

Penn State Population Research Institute: 2004 National Symposium on Family Issues: Romance and Sex in Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood: Risks and Opportunities," a symposium to be held Oct. 12-13, 2004 in State College, Pennsylvania. For more information, including registration information see:

http://www.pop.psu.edu/events/symposium/2004.htm

For more information about PSPRI National Symposium on Family Issues series:

http://www.pop.psu.edu/events/symposium/index2.htm
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International Union For the Scientific Study of Population Call for Abstracts: IUSSP has issued a call for paper and poster abstracts for its 25th Annual conference, to be held in Tours France, July 21-25, 2005. "The official languages of the Conference will be English, French and Spanish. Abstracts for paper and poster presentations may be submitted in one of the three languages by Internet until 15 September 2004." For more information see:

http://www.iussp.org/France2005/submiteng.php

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DATA:

Census Bureau:

A. "2002 Economic Census: Advance Nonemployer Statistics" (HTML, Microsoft Excel, and .pdf format). The data is linked to from a Census Bureau news release: "Nation Adds 2.2 Million Nonemployer Businesses Over Five-Year Period" (CB04-74, May 21, 2004).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/economic_census/001814.html

B. "Federal, State, and Local Governments: 2003 State Government Tax Collections (Microsoft Excel and comma delimited ASCII format, with documentation in HTML format. The data is linked to from a Census Bureau news release: "State Government Tax Collections Up 2.4 Percent; Biggest Increase in Tobacco Taxes" (CB04-81, May 20, 2004).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/governments/001813.html

Click on "State Government Tax Collections Up 2.4 Percent; Biggest Increase in Tobacco Taxes" for link to data.
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National Center for Health Statistics: NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). NCHS has begun releasing the NHANES data files (SAS transport format), along with complete documentation (.pdf and Microsoft Word format) and frequencies (.pdf format). Data for each individual set of files can be downloaded as one self-executing archive (.exe). Note that this is not a complete release of files, as all NHANES 2001-02 files are not yet publicly available. As more files are released, they will be available at this site.

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/major/nhanes/nhanes01-02.htm
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National Center for Education Statistics:

A. "National Public Education Financial Survey FY 2002" (NCES 2004336, May 2004, ASCII and Microsoft Excel format, with documentation in .pdf and/or ASCII text format). "This data file and documentation contain finance data for public elementary and secondary education at the state level, for fiscal year 2002, and school year 2001-02. Revenues are reported by source and expenditures are reported by function and object. Student membership and average daily attendance data are also included. Data are submitted to NCES by state education agencies."

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2004336

B. "School District Financial Survey FY 2001: (NCES 2004337, May 2004, ASCII and Microsoft Excel format, with documentation in .pdf and/or ASCII text format). "This data file and documentation contain finance data for public elementary and secondary education at the school district level, for fiscal year 2001, and school year 2000-01. Revenues are reported by source and expenditures are reported by function and object. Student membership data are also included. Data are submitted to NCES by state education agencies."

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2004337

C. "CCD [Common Core of Data] Public Elementary/Secondary School Universe Survey: School Year 2002-03" (NCES 2004333, May 2004, .zip compressed ASCII or SAS files, with documentation in either .pdf (.zip or uncompressed) or ASCII text format). "The Public Elementary/Secondary School Universe Survey Data provides information about schools such as: type of school (special education, vocational education, charter, magnet); students by grade, race/ethnicity and gender; free lunch eligibility; and classroom teachers. All data are for public elementary and secondary schools for the 2002-03 school year. Data were provided by state education agencies (SEAs) from their administrative records."

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2004333

D. "CCD [Common Core of Data] State Nonfiscal Survey of Public Elementary and Secondary Education: School Year 2002-03" (NCES 2004334, May 2004, .zip compressed ASCII or Microsoft Excel format with documentation in either .pdf (.zip or uncompressed) or ASCII text format). "The State Nonfiscal Survey of Public and Secondary Education provides information about student, staff, and graduate counts for public elementary and secondary education for the 2002-03 school year. CCD data were provided by state education agencies (SEAs) from their administrative records."

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2004334

E. "CCD [Common Core of Data] Local Education Agency Universe Survey: School Year 2002-03" (NCES 2004335, May 2004, .zip compressed ASCII or SAS files, with documentation in either .pdf (.zip or uncompressed) or ASCII text format). "The Local Education Agency (School District) Universe Survey Data provides information about student, staff, and graduate counts for public elementary and secondary agencies for the 2002-03 school year. Data were provided by state education agencies (SEAs) from their administrative records."

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2004335
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Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Community Context and Sentencing Decisions in 39 Counties in the United States, 1998 (#3923)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03923.xml

National Education Longitudinal Study: Base Year Through Fourth Follow-Up, 1988-2000 (#3955)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03955.xml
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Luxembourg Income Study: "A major revision has been carried out for each of the German datasets based on the Socio Economic Panel (GSOEP). To know the impact of this revision, please check the revision notes : GE84, GE89, GE94, GE00." All revision notes can be found at:

http://www.lisproject.org/techdoc/ge/geindex.htm

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu