Current Demographic Research Report #15, January 21, 2004.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

Bureau of Labor Statistics Periodical
National Center for Health Statistics Reports
United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Compendium
World Health Organization Influenza Summary
Population Reference Bureau Articles
Urban Institute Article, Brief
National Academies Press Monograph
Johns Hopkins Info Health Pop Reporter

WORKING PAPERS

Carolina Population Center MEASURE Evaluation Program
Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
Institute for Social and Economic Research

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta
Other Journals

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

Population Reference Bureau
Harvard Population Center

DATA

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
National Center for Health Statistics
National Cancer Institute

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REPORTS, ARTICLES, PERIODICALS COMPENDIA:

Bureau of Labor Statistics Periodical: _Monthly Labor Review_ (Vol. 126, No. 11, November/December 2003, .pdf format).

http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/mlrhome.htm

Note: This is a temporary address. When the next _MLR_ is released, this one, along with all others back to 1988, will be available at:

http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/archive.htm
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National Center for Health Statistics Reports:

A. "Summary Health Statistics for U.S. Adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2001," by J.W. Lucas, J.S. Schiller, and V.E. Benson (Vital and Health Statistics Series 10, No. 218, January 2004, .pdf format, 134p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_10/sr10_218.pdf

B. "Estimating the Prevalence of Uninsured Children: An Evaluation of Data From the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, 2001," by S.J. Blumberg, L. Osborn, J.V. Luke, et. al. (Vital and Health Statistics Series 2, No. 136, January 2004, .pdf format, 38p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_02/sr02_136.pdf
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United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Compendium: _The State of the World's Children_ (2004)_: Girls, Education, and Development (December 2004, .pdf format, 147p.). "The State of the World's Children 2004 focuses on girls education and its relationship to all other development goals and to the promise of Education For All. It presents a multi-layered case for investing in girls education as a strategic way to ensure the rights of both boys and girls and to advance a country's development agenda. The web summary touches on general points of the main text and presents panel abstracts highlighting successful programmes."

http://www.unicef.org/sowc04/index.html

Click on "Contents" on the left side of the page for link to full text.
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World Health Organization Influenza Summary: "Influenza A(H3N2) activity remains widespread in many countries - update 7," (Communicable Disease Surveillance & Response (CSR), Jan. 13, 2004).

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2004_01_13a/en/
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Population Reference Bureau Articles:

A. "Facing Child Poverty in Rural America," by William P. O'Hare and Kenneth M. Johnson (January 2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/Articles/04/Facing_Child_Poverty_in_Rural_America.htm

B. "The Poor-Rich Health Divide," by Dara Carr (January 2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/Articles/04/The_Poor-Rich_Health_Divide.htm

C. "Haiti's Health Indicators Reflect Its Political and Economic Pains," by Yvette Collymore (January 2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/Articles/04/Haitis_Health_Indicators_Reflect_Its_Political_and_Economic_Pains.htm

D. "Asian-American Children Are Members of a Diverse and Urban Population," by Juanita Tamayo Lott (January 2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/Articles/04/Asian-American_Children_Are_Members_of_a_Diverse_and_Urban_Population.htm

E. "Economic, Social, and Demographic Losses and Gains Among American Indians," by Angela A.A. Willeto and Charlotte Goodluck (January 2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/Articles/04/Economic,_Social,_and_Demographic_Losses_and_Gains_Among_American_Indians.htm

F. "Gender, Health, and Development in the Americas" (Population Reference Bureau and Pan American Health Organization [PAHO], 2004, .pdf format, 12p.).

http://www.prb.org/pdf/GenderHealthDevAmers_Eng.pdf
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Urban Institute Article, Brief:

A. "Undocumented Immigrants: Facts and Figures," by Jeffrey S. Passel, Randolph Capps, and Michael E. Fix (January 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 4p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=1000587

B. "Child Support Increases for Low-Income Families" (January 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 1p.). "A significantly larger share of children in low-income families received child support in 2001 than in 1996. Among poor families, those receiving child support increased from 31 percent in 1996 to 36 percent in 2001. Children with family incomes between 100 and 200 percent of poverty were also more likely to receive child support in 2001 (45 percent in 1996 compared with 50 percent in 2001). Children whose family incomes were more than twice the poverty threshold did not experience gains in child support."

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=900675
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National Academies Press Monograph: _Insuring America's Health: Principles and Recommendations_ (Committee on Consequences of Uninsurance, Board on Health Care Services, Institute of Medicine, 2004, OpenBook format, 224p.). Note: Ordering information for print or .pdf copies of the monograph are available at the site.

http://www.nap.edu/catalog/10874.html

Click on "OpenBook" for link to full text.

IOM press release:

http://www.iom.edu/event.asp?id=16675
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Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (Vol. 4, No. 3, Jan. 19, 2004). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

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WORKING PAPERS:

Carolina Population Center MEASURE Evaluation Program: "The Reach and Impact of Social Marketing and Reproductive Health Communication Campaigns in Zambia," by Dominique Meekers and Ronan Van Rossem (WP-04-77, January 2004, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract:

Objectives: To address reproductive health problems and the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Zambia, several reproductive and HIV/AIDS prevention programs are being implemented. This paper assesses the reach of selected radio and television programs about family planning and HIV/AIDS and of communications about the socially marketed Maximum condoms in Zambia, as well as their impact on discussion of family planning and condom use.

Data and Methods: The analysis was based on data from the 2001-2002 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey, which contained information on a representative sample of women age 15-49 and men age 15-59. To control for self-selection and endogeneity, we use a two-stage regression model to estimate the effect of program exposure on the behavioral outcomes.

Results: Results for both men and women show that those who were exposed to radio and television programs about family planning and HIV/AIDS were more likely to have discussed family planning with their partner (OR = 1.14 for men and 1.06 for women) and to have ever used a condom (OR = 1.12 and 1.04, respectively). Men with high exposure to socially marketed Maximum condoms were more likely than those with low exposure to the program to have discussed family planning (OR = 1.30), as well as to have ever used a condom (OR = 1.35) and to have used a condom at their last sexual intercourse (OR = 1.15).

Conclusion: Findings suggest that the reproductive health and social marketing campaigns in Zambia reached a large portion of the population and had a significant impact on family planning discussion and condom use.

http://www.cpc.unc.edu/measure/publications/?type=wp&code=77&PHPSESSID=82815b17f9acf002dcb6bb39a4c7afcb

Click on "To complete working paper" at the bottom of the abstract for full text.
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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research [Rostok, Germany]: "Women's labor force attachment and childbearing in Finland," by Andres Vikat (WP 2004-01, January 2004, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

This paper analyzes the impact of women's economic activity, earnings and take-up of child home care allowance on childbearing, using a ten percent sample from a longitudinal register data set that covers the entire female population of reproductive age in Finland in 1988--2000. Results show that a woman's economic activity and income were positively correlated with entry into motherhood and to a lesser extent with having a second child. This supports the notion of a common pattern of this relationship in the Nordic countries. In the light of Finlands roller coaster economic development in the 1990s, the effects of a change in female population composition by economic characteristics on the fertility trend were small.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2004-001.pdf
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University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty: "Exploring the Influence of the National School Lunch Program on Children," by Rachel E. Dunifon and Lori Kowaleski-Jones (Discussion Paper DP-1277-04, January 2003, .pdf format, 17p.).

Abstract:

Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, 1998-1999 Kindergarten Cohort, the study examines two research questions: What are the effects of participation in the National School Lunch Program on changes in children's behavior, test scores, and body weight? Do these effects differ by gender? To address issues of selection, we use first-difference regression techniques. These techniques reduce the bias resulting from unobserved time-invariant characteristics that influence a family's enrollment in the National School Lunch Program. The results from this project provide insights into the role of the program in influencing child health, academic well-being, and social development.

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/irp/pubs/dp127704.pdf
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Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD):"Health-Care Systems: Lessons from the Reform Experience," by Elizabeth Docteur and Howard Oxley (Working Paper 2003-9, December 2003, .pdf format, 97p.).

Summary:

This study presents a broad overview of health-system reforms in OECD countries over the past several decades. Reforms are assessed according to their impact on the following policy goals: ensuring access to needed health-care services; improving the quality of health care and its outcomes; allocating an "appropriate" level of public sector and economy-wide resources to health care (macroeconomic efficiency); and ensuring that services are provided in a cost-efficient and cost-effective manner (microeconomic efficiency).While nearly all OECD countries have achieved universal coverage of health-care risks, initiatives to address persistent disparities in access are now being undertaken in a number of countries. In light of new evidence of serious problems with health-care quality, many countries have recently introduced reforms intended to improve this, but it is too soon to generalise as to the relative effects of alternative approaches. A variety of instruments aimed at cost control have succeeded in slowing the growth of (particularly public) health-care spending over the 1980s and 1990s but these have not addressed the root causes of growth and health-care spending continues to rise as a share of GDP in most countries. On the other hand, a few countries have been concerned that spending restrictions have gone too far and hurt health system-performance. There is some evidence that supply of health services has become more efficient, particularly in the hospital sector, but scope for further gains exists. A range of measures, such as better payment methods, have improved the microeconomic incentives facing providers. However, introducing improved incentives through a more competitive environment among providers and insurers has proved difficult.

http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/5/53/22364122.pdf
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Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER), Essex University [UK]:

A. "Early Motherhood and Disadvantage: a comparison between ethnic groups," by Karen L. Robson and Richard Berthou (WP 2003-29, October 2003, .pdf format, 33p.)

Abstract:

This paper examines the relationship between age at first birth and poverty among ethnic minorities in Britain. It is well known that ethnic minorities, particularly Pakistanis and Bangladeshis, have very high rates of family poverty and early fertility. Because it has been established that early motherhood is associated with a high risk of poverty and other disadvantages, it is tempting to link Pakistani and Bangladeshi poverty with their early family formation patterns. We find, however, that age at first birth had little effect on the poverty experienced by ethnic minorities. While the disadvantaged outcomes of teenage motherhood within the white community appear to be associated with the young women's departure from the dominant social norm, when early fertility is the norm in a minority community, it does not lead to any further disadvantage beyond that experienced by the ethnic group as a whole.

http://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/pubs/workpaps/pdf/2003-29.pdf

B. "Who Has a Child as a Teenager?" by John F. Ermisch and David J. Pevalin (WP 2003-30, October 2003, .pdf format, 22p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses data from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) and the British 1970 Cohort Study (BCS70) to investigate the family background and childhood factors that are associated with having a child as a teenager. The advantage of combining results from these two sets of data is that the BHPS analyses are restricted to a few background factors while the BCS70 analyses have far more. However, the results obtained from the BHPS data are reasonably replicated with the BCS70 data in that family social class and having lived with one parent during childhood are significantly associated with a higher likelihood of a teenage birth. From the BCS70 data we show that the effect of having lived with one parent is not significant once child-specific variables, such as self-esteem and teacher rated behaviour, are included in the models. Mothers age at the birth of the cohort member and mothers education have significant, consistent and robust associations with the likelihood of teenage birth. The analyses reported in this paper are part of a larger programme of work for the Department of Health examining the medium and long-term consequences of early childbearing.

http://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/pubs/workpaps/pdf/2003-30.pdf

C. "Outcomes in Childhood and Adulthood by Mothers Age at Birth: evidence from the 1970 British Cohort Study," by David J. Pevalin (WP 2003-31, October 2003, .pdf format, 19p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses data from the British 1970 Cohort Study (BCS70) to investigate the associations between the age of the mother at the birth of the cohort member (1970) and a range of outcomes at birth and ages 5, 10 and 30. The results show consistent associations through childhood and early adulthood that generally reflect poorer outcomes the younger the mother. Specifically, cohort members (CMs) born to younger mothers were more likely to be born preterm or with low birthweight. At age 5 those CMs born to younger mothers scored significantly lower on a standardised EPVT, higher on the Rutter Child Scale and were shorter in height. At age 10, the CMs born to younger mothers were more likely not to have a father figure in the home, higher residential mobility, and poorer quality housing. The CMs themselves were more likely to have been in care and were still significantly shorter in height. Also at age 10, the CMs teachers were more likely to rate them as below average on general knowledge, less popular with their peers, less co-operative and less able to concentrate. In adulthood both men and women CMs born to younger mothers were more likely to have had a child themselves before the age of 20 and less likely to achieve A-levels or equivalent. The analyses reported in this paper are part of a larger programme of work for the Department of Health examining the medium and long-term consequences of early childbearing.

http://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/pubs/workpaps/pdf/2003-31.pdf

D. "Does a Teen-Birth Have Longer-Term Impacts on the Mother? Suggestive evidence from the British Household Panel Study," by John F. Ermisch (WP 2003-32, November 2003, .pdf format, 36p.).

Abstract:

The paper studies associations between a woman's age at becoming a mother and subsequent outcomes, such as her living standard, when she is aged 30-51. The data come from the British Household Panel Survey over the years 1991-2001. The analysis suggests that having a teen-birth, particularly when aged under 18, constrains a woman's opportunities in the marriage market in the sense that she finds it more difficult to find and retain a partner, and she partners with more unemployment-prone and lower earning men. Teenage mothers are much less likely to be a homeowner later in life, and her living standard, as measured by equivalent household income, is about 20% lower.

http://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/pubs/workpaps/pdf/2003-32.pdf

E. "Mental Health, Teenage Motherhood, and Age at First Birth among British Women in the 1990s," by Tim Futing Liao (WP 2003-33, November 2003, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

Teenage fertility has many consequences, one of which is its influence on the mental health of mothers. In this paper we compare the medium- to long-term mental health effects of four groups of women in Britain in the 1990s: teenage women who had first births, teenage nonmothers, and mothers of two older age groups. We study as well the effect of womens age at first birth on their psychological well-being and estimate the so-called pivotal age at first birth to determine at what age having a birth would change to from a bust to a boost to mental health. These aims are achieved by analyzing the first 10 waves the British Household Panel Survey (1991-2000). We find that teenage mothers tend to have a significantly higher level of depression in the medium term postpartum. More generally, within five years postpartum, no pivotal age at first birth is found, and estimated pivotal age at first birth begins to appear reasonable only from five to ten years postpartum. The results suggest that, while older mothers tend to have a smaller likelihood of depression than younger mothers, the effects are curvilinear, and that motherhood may not enhance a mother's well-being until the child is at least no longer a toddler.

http://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/pubs/workpaps/pdf/2003-33.pdf

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "browse by publication"
C. Click the "fax/ariel" radio button, type the Journal Name in the "by words in the title" search box and click "search".
D. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

International Labour Review (Vol. 142, No. 2, October 2003). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

Journal of Political Economy (Vol. 111, No. 6, 2003). Note: Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.
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Other Journals:

American Journal of Sociology (Vol. 109, No. 3, November 2003). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJS/journal/contents/v109n3.html

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FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

Population Reference Bureau: "Fellows Program in Population Policy Communications." "The Population Reference Bureau (PRB) is now accepting applications for its 2004-2005 Fellows Program in Population Policy Communications... The program was developed to bridge the gap between research findings and the policy development process. While research often has profound policy implications, it must be communicated effectively to a variety of nontechnical audiences in order to have an impact." For more information, including application information and deadlines, see:

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/Articles/03/Fellows_Program_in_Population_Policy_Communications.htm
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Harvard Population Center: "The Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies is now accepting Bell Fellowship applications for the 2004-2005 academic year. Applicants examining issues of population, health, well-being, or development in Africa are particularly encouraged to apply. This flexible, yet intensive, non-degree program provides leadership and analytic training for early- to mid-career multidisciplinary professionals and scholars in the field of population and development." Application deadline is Mar. 1, 2004. For more information, including application forms, see:

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/hcpds/bell.html

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DATA:

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Survey, 2003 (#3912)

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu:8080/ICPSR-STUDY/03912.xml

Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS), 1998-2000 (#3891)

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu:8080/ICPSR-STUDY/03891.xml
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National Center for Health Statistics: NCHS has updated its "Healthy Women: State Trends in Health and Mortality" tables (Beyond 20/20 extraction format, Beyond 20/20 software required, and can be downloaded from the site). The updated tables are:

All Causes Mortality by State, Race, Hispanic Origin, Sex and Age, 1997-2001

Asthma Mortality by State, Race, Hispanic Origin, Sex and Age, 1997-2001

Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease Mortality by State, Race, Hispanic Origin, Sex and Age, 1997-2001

Child and Adolescent Mortality by State, Race, Hispanic Origin, Sex, Age, and Cause, 1997-2001

Mortality by State, Race, Hispanic Origin, Sex, Age, and Cause, 1997-2001

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/healthywomen.htm

Click on "Tables" near the top of the page for link to data. Click on"browser" to download "Beyond 20/20" software.
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National Cancer Institute: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Result (SEER) program has released US population data at the county, state, and national level for: 1969-2001, Races: White, Black, Non-White; 1990-2001, Expanded Races: White, Black, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian/Pacific Islander; and 1990-2001, Hispanic: White Non-Hispanic, White Hispanic, Non-White Non-Hispanic, Non-White Hispanic (self decompressing [.exe] ASCII format). The data dictionary is available in .pdf format. Population data are available by sex and age (age 0, 1-4, 5-9 ... 80-84, 85+ and all ages.

http://seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html

Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu