Current Demographic Research Report #111, November 29, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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CDERR is compiled and edited by Jack Solock, Kristin Wick, and Charlie Fiss of the University of Wisconsin Center for Demography and Ecology Information Services Center.

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NOTE! Index Items marked with *** indicate there are related articles. Articles can be found with the item in the body of the report. We cannot guarantee the permanence of related article addresses. They may be available in Lexis-Nexis, ProQuest Newspapers. Check your organization's library.

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Index to this issue:

CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

U.S.

Centers for Disease Control Periodical, Surveillance Summary

Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services, Office of Applied Studies Reports

Government Accountability Office Report: "No Child Left Behind Act: Improved Accessibility to Education's Information Could Help States Further Implement Teacher Qualification Requirements"

National Center for Education Statistics Periodical, Report

Bureau of Labor Statistics News Releases

Federal Bureau of Investigation Report: "Hate Crime Statistics, 2004"

Department of Homeland Security, Office of Immigration Statistics Report: " Fiscal Year 2005 Immigration Monthly Statistical Report: September 2005 Year End Report"

National Science Foundation Info Brief: "2004 Doctorate Awards Increase in Science and Engineering Fields for the Second Year in a Row"

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World Health Organization Reports

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United Nations Children's Fund Report, Innocenti Digest Report

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United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization Report: "The State of Food Insecurity in the World: 2005"

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World Bank B-Span Webcasts

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European Commission:

Eurostat Compendium: _Eurostat in figures - Eurostat yearbook 2005_

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Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Press Release: " The Number of Poor People in Latin America Has Fallen by 13 Million Since 2003"

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Australia:

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Reports

Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing News Release: " Private health cover" (health insurance)

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Canada:

Statistics Canada _The Daily_ Articles

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Finland:

Statistics Finland News Release: "Statistical Yearbook of Finland 2005, basic reference book in the field of statistics, released"

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France:

Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques Article: "Chinese population challenges: fewer girls, more old people?"

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Georgia:

Ministry of Economic Development of Georgia: Department for Statistics: " Agricultural Census of Georgia 2004: Preliminary Results"

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Malta:

Malta Ministry of Health, the Elderly, and Community Care Report: " Childhood Cancers 1989-2004"

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Netherlands:

Statistics Netherlands Web Magazine Articles

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Norway:

Statistics Norway Articles

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Pakistan:

Pakistan Federal Bureau of Statistics Report: "Pakistan Social and Living Standards Measurement Survey 2004-05"

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Poland:

Central Statistical Office Periodical: "Statistical Bulletin"

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U.K

U.K. Health Protection Agency Report: "Mapping the Issues: HIV and other Sexually Transmitted Infections in the United Kingdom: 2005"

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

_Demographic Research_ Article: "Five period measures of longevity"

_Milbank Quarterly_ Special Centennial Issue

Population Reference Bureau Article: "Obstacles Remain to Wide Adoption of Female Condom"

The Brookings Institution, Metropolitan Policy Program Reports

Kaiser Family Foundation Factsheet: "State Fiscal Conditions and Medicaid"

Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health National Center for Children in Poverty Reports

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities Report: "Hardship Indicators Point to a Difficult Holiday Season: National Policy Response is Off Kilter"

Political Economy Research Institute Report: "Decent Work in America"

Monographs on the Demography of India (K.K. Agencies)

_British Medical Journal_ Article Abstract: "Psychosocial effects of the 2001 UK foot and mouth disease epidemic in a rural population: qualitative diary based study"

_Lancet_ Viewpoint: "What would Malthus say about AIDS in Africa?"

Info for Health Pop. Reporter

WORKING PAPERS

University of Michigan Population Studies Center
Census Bureau
National Bureau of Economic Research
Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Center for Economic Studies/Ifo Institute for Economic Research (CESifo)

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Other Journals

CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS

National Center for Health Statistics: "Monitoring the Public's Health: Using Data From the National Center for Health Statistics"

National Leadership Summit on Eliminating Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health

Kaiser Family Foundation Conference Coverage: "4th MIM Pan-African Malaria Conference"

STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES

University of Minnesota Population Center

Erasmus Mundus Master (European Union): "PhoenixEM Dynamics of Health and Welfare"

Special Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research Summer Program Course: "Longitudinal Analysis of Historical Demographic Data"

International Union for the Scientific Study of Population: "International seminar on Longevity: Early-life Conditions, Social Mobility and Other Factors that Influence Survival to Old Age: Call for Junior Demographer-Junior Demographer Travel Grant"

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Penn State Population Research Institute
Michigan State University

LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES

US House Government Reform Committee Hearing Publication: "The Next Flu Pandemic: Evaluating U.S. Readiness"

DATA

Census Bureau
National Center for Health Statistics
Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
UK Data Archive

WEBSITES OF INTEREST

Kaiser Family Foundation Updates

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

U.S.:

1. Centers for Disease Control Periodical, Surveillance Summary:

A. _Emerging Infectious Diseases_ (Vol. 11, No. 12, December 2005, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/index.htm

Note: This is a temporary address. When the next _EID_ is released, this one, along with all others, will be available at:

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/pastcon.htm

B. "Abortion Surveillance --- United States, 2002," by Lilo T. Strauss, Joy Herndon, Jeani Chang, Wilda Y. Parker, Sonya V. Bowens, and Cynthia J. Berg (_Moridity and Mortality Weekly Report Surveillance Summaries_, Vol. 54, SS07, Nov. 25, 2005, HTML and .pdf format).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5407a1.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/ss/ss5407.pdf

C. "Contraceptive Use --- United States and Territories, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2002" (_Moridity and Mortality Weekly Report Surveillance Summaries_, Vol. 54, SS06, Nov. 18, 2005, HTML and .pdf format).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5406a1.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/ss/ss5406.pdf

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2. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services, Office of Applied Studies Reports:

A. "2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Data Collection, Final Report," by Katherine Bowman, Lewis Caviness, Lee Ellen Coffey, David Cunningham, Rebecca Granger, Shuangquan Liu, Peilan Martin, Susan Myers, Scott Payne, and Lanny Piper (August 2005, .pdf format, 464p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/NSDUH/2k4DCFR.pdf

B. "Primary Alcohol Admissions Aged 21 or Older: Alcohol Only vs. Alcohol Plus a Secondary Drug: 2003," (Drug and Alcohol Services Information System (DASIS) Report, November 25, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k5/alcTX/alcTX.cfm

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3. Government Accountability Office Report: "No Child Left Behind Act: Improved Accessibility to Education's Information Could Help States Further Implement Teacher Qualification Requirements" (GAO-06-25, November 2005, .pdf format, 55p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d0625.pdf

Note: This is a temporary address. GAO reports are always available at:

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gaoreports/index.html

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4. National Center for Education Statistics Periodical, Report:

A. _Education Statistics Quarterly_ (NCES 2006613, Vol. 6, No. 4, November 2005, .pdf format, 143p.).

Abstract:

The Quarterly offers a comprehensive overview of work done across all of NCES. Each issue includes short publications and summaries covering all NCES publications and data products released in a given time period as well as notices about training and funding opportunities. In addition, each issue includes a featured topic with invited commentary, and a note on the topic from NCES.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006613

B. "Changes in Patterns of Prices and Financial Aid," by Alisa F. Cunningham (NCES2006153, November 2005, .pdf format, 147p.).

Abstract:

This report uses data from the Integrated Postsecondary Educations Data System (IPEDS) to examine median prices of attendance, financial aid, and net prices for first-time, full-time, degree/certificate-seeking undergraduates over the period 1999-2000 to 2001-02. To capture the interaction between price of attendance and financial aid patterns over time and to take into account inflation during this period, indices of changes in three different types of prices-tuition, price of attendance, and net price-were developed for this report. The major findings of the study are that during this period, both the median price of attendance and the median value of total aid increased as a faster rate than inflation at public 4-year institutions, private not-for-profit, 4-year institutions, and private for-profit, less-than-4-year institutions. However, as a result of financial aid, net prices did not rise as rapidly as price of attendance. At public 2-year institutions, net prices not only increased at a slower rate than did sticker prices, but they also increased at a slower rate than inflation. The analysis of the price indices confirmed that examining different types of prices and net prices may lead to different conclusions. In all institutional sectors, increases in median tuition and fee levels and in price of attendance tended to be greater than increases in net prices. In most sectors, median net prices increased at a slower rate than did price of attendance over the three-year period reviewed in this report. In the public 2-year sector, net prices increased at a slower rate than inflation or even decreased.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006153

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5. Bureau of Labor Statistics News Releases:

A. "International Comparisons of Hourly Compensation Costs for Production Workers in Manufacturing, 2004" (Nov. 18, 2005, ASCII text, HTML, and .pdf format, 15p.).

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/ichcc.toc.htm

B. "Occupational Injuries and Illnesses, 2004" (Nov. 17, 2005, ASCII text, HTML, and .pdf format, 29p.).

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/osh.toc.htm

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6. Federal Bureau of Investigation Report: "Hate Crime Statistics, 2004" (November 2005, .pdf format, 173p.). " Hate Crime Statistics, 2004 , chronicles 7,649 criminal incidents that law enforcement agencies reported--as motivated by a bias against a race, religion, disability, ethnicity, or sexual orientation--and includes information on 9,035 offenses, 9,528 victims, and 7,145 known offenders. Eleven of the 14 tables in this publication present various information about hate crime incidents, the types of offenses committed, and some aspects of the victims and the offenders. The remaining tables contain hate crime data aggregated by state or agency type and show the parameters of participation for law enforcement agencies that contributed data to the program."

http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/hc2004/openpage.htm

Click on "Download Files" under "Appendices" for link to full text.

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7. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Immigration Statistics Report: "Fiscal Year 2005 Immigration Monthly Statistical Report: September 2005 Year End Report" (October 2005).

http://uscis.gov/graphics/shared/aboutus/statistics/msrnov05/index.htm

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8. National Science Foundation Info Brief: "2004 Doctorate Awards Increase in Science and Engineering Fields for the Second Year in a Row" (NSF 06-301, November 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 5p.).

http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/infbrief/nsf06301/

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World Health Organization Reports:

A. "WHO Multi-country Study on Women's Health and Domestic Violence against Women" (November 2005, .pdf format, 206p.). "This report presents initial results based on interviews with 24 000 women by carefully trained interviewers. The study was implemented by WHO, in collaboration with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), PATH, USA, research institutions and women's organizations in the participating countries. This report covers 15 sites and 10 countries: Bangladesh, Brazil, Ethiopia, Japan, Peru, Namibia, Samoa, Serbia and Montenegro, Thailand and the United Republic of Tanzania. Report findings document the prevalence of intimate partner violence and its association with women's physical, mental, sexual and reproductive health. Data is included on non-partner violence, sexual abuse during childhood and forced first sexual experience. Information is also provided on women's responses: Whom do women turn to and whom do they tell about the violence in their lives? Do they leave or fight back? Which services do they use and what response do they get?

http://www.who.int/gender/violence/who_multicountry_study/en/

B. "Closing the Health Inequalities Gap: An International Perspective," by Iain K. Crombie, Linda Irvine, Lawrence Elliott, and Hilary Wallace (2005, .pdf format, 76p.).

Abstract:

This report presents an analysis of official documents on government policies to tackle inequalities in health from 13 developed countries. All countries recognize that health inequalities are caused by adverse socioeconomic and environmental circumstances. However they differ in their definitions of inequalities and in their approaches to tackling the problem. Sweden and Northern Ireland have structured their overall public health policy to tackle the underlying determinants of inequalities in health. England is the only country with a separate comprehensive policy. Most countries also have policies on poverty, social inclusion, and social justice. These are motivated by a concern for human rights and dignity and deal primarily with the underlying causes of health inequalities. While broadly setting the same overarching goal, policies on health inequalities show many different features. Policymakers face two challenges: to ensure that strategies to tackle the macroenvironmental factors feature in policy on inequalities in health, and to ensure that health becomes a prominent issue in social justice policy. Few countries have a coordinated approach to tackling inequalities in health.

http://www.euro.who.int/Document/E87599.pdf

C. "HIV/AIDS in Europe: Moving from death sentence to chronic disease management," edited by Srdan Matic, Jeffrey V. Lazarus and Martin C. Donoghoe (2005, .pdf format, 282p.).

http://www.who.dk/eprise/main/who/InformationSources/Publications/Catalogue/20051123_2

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United Nations Children's Fund Report, Periodical Special Issue:

A. "Gender Achievements and Prospects in Education: The GAP report (Part One)" (November 2005, .pdf format, 100p.).

http://www.unicef.org/publications/files/GAP_Report_part1_final_14_Nov.pdf

B. _Innocenti Digest_ Report: "Changing a Harmful Social Convention: Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (Innocenti Research Centre, 2005, .pdf format, 45p.).

http://www.unicef-icdc.org/publications/pdf/fgm-gb-2005.pdf

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United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization Report: "The State of Food Insecurity in the World: 2005" (November 2005, .pdf format, 40p.). Previous reports going back to 1999 are also available at the site.

http://www.fao.org/sof/sofi/index_en.htm

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World Bank B-Span Webcasts (RealPlayer plug-in or helper application required):

A. "International Migration: Problem or Opportunity?" (Oct. 6, 2005, running time: 1 hour, 6 minutes, 49 seconds).

http://info.worldbank.org/etools/BSPAN/PresentationView.asp?PID=1605&EID=785

B. "Gender-based Violence and Equitable Development: The Role of the International Community" (Oct. 24, 2005, running time: 2 hours).

http://info.worldbank.org/etools/BSPAN/PresentationView.asp?PID=1616&EID=790

More information on B-Span:

http://info.worldbank.org/etools/BSPAN/index.asp

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European Commission:

Eurostat Compendium: _Eurostat in figures - Eurostat yearbook 2005_ (November 2005, .pdf format, 310p.).

http://epp.eurostat.cec.eu.int/portal/page?_pageid=1073,46587259&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL&p_product_code=KS-CD-05-001

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Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Press Release: " The Number of Poor People in Latin America Has Fallen by 13 Million Since 2003" (Nov. 25, 2005). The press release links to an ECLAC Compendium: _Social Panorama of Latin America, 2005_ (_Panorama social de America Latina 2005_). There is a link at the site to a 48p. (.pdf format) summary (in Spanish).

http://www.eclac.org/cgi-bin/getProd.asp?xml=/prensa/noticias/comunicados/8/23028/P23028.xml&xsl=/prensa/tpl-i/p6f.xsl&base=/tpl-i/top-bottom.xsl

Click on "Social Panorama of Latin America, 2005" for link to summary (Bajar documento)

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Australia:

1. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Reports:

A. "Chronic Kidney Disease in Australia 2005," (2005, .pdf format, 110p.).

Abstract:

Chronic kidney disease has numerous impacts on both individual health and health services. With risk factors that are highly prevalent in Australia, including diabetes and high blood pressure, the number of Australians at risk of chronic kidney disease is increasing. Indigenous Australians in particular are at high risk. Chronic kidney disease may lead to serious illness and death. In severe cases, kidney function may deteriorate to the point where a kidney transplant or dialysis is required for survival. People with chronic kidney disease are also at risk of a range of complications, including cardiovascular disease. However, in many cases chronic kidney disease is preventable and treatable. This report is the first to bring together data from a variety of sources to highlight the impact of chronic kidney disease in Australia. The information within will be relevant to policy makers, the wider community and anyone with an interest in chronic kidney disease.

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10137

B. "Cervical Screening in Australia 2002-2003," (October 2005, .pdf format, 91p.).

Abstract:

The report presents most recent information on participation in cervical screening, rate of early re-screening, low-grade and high-grade abnormalities detected, incidence of cervical cancer and mortality. Analyses of incidence and mortality data by location (major cities, regional and remote) as well as mortality by Indigenous status are also presented. Where possible, data are presented by state and territory stratification.

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10218

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2. Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing News Release:

A. "Private health cover" (health insurance) (ABB141/05, Nov. 18, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 1p.).

http://www.health.gov.au/internet/ministers/publishing.nsf/Content/health-mediarel-yr2005-ta-abb141.htm

B. "National Drug Strategy Household Survey - detailed findings" (November 2005, .pdf format, 142p.).

Abstract:

This report extends the analysis presented in 2004 National Drug Strategy Household Survey: First Results by providing more detailed information on drug use prevalence, drug-related behaviours and incidents, and support for drug-related policy and legislation. The report features analysis relating to young people-reflecting the inclusion in the 2004 survey of 12-13-year-olds-and new material on mental and physical health, also included for the first time in 2004. This report, along with others in the Drug Statistics Series, will be a useful resource for policy-makers, planners and researchers interested in drug-related matters.

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10190

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Canada:

Statistics Canada _The Daily_ Articles:

A. "Study: Youth and the labour market," (Nov. 23, 2005).

http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/051123/d051123b.htm

B. "General Social Survey: Criminal victimization, 2004," (Nov. 24, 2005).

http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/051124/d051124b.htm

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Finland:

Statistics Finland News Release: "Statistical Yearbook of Finland 2005, basic reference book in the field of statistics, released" (Nov. 23, 2005). Pricing information for a print copy or a membership to the yearbook online service is available at the site.

http://www.stat.fi/ajk/tiedotteet/v2005/tiedote_063_2005-11-23_en.html

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France:

Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques Article: "Chinese population challenges: fewer girls, more old people?" by Isabelle Attane (_Population & Societies, No. 416, October 2005, .pdf format, 4p.).

http://www.ined.fr/englishversion/publications/pop_et_soc/pesa416.pdf

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Georgia:

Ministry of Economic Development of Georgia: Department for Statistics: " Agricultural Census of Georgia 2004: Preliminary Results" (November 2005).

http://www.statistics.ge/Main/En/Agriculture.htm

Click on titles for links to tables (English headings are provided).

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Malta:

Malta Ministry of Health, the Elderly, and Community Care Report: " Childhood Cancers 1989-2004" (November 2005, .pdf format, 3p.).

http://www.sahha.gov.mt/showdoc.aspx?id=44&filesource=4&file=childhoodcancers_1989-2004.pdf

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Netherlands:

Statistics Netherlands Web Magazine Articles

A. "Number of naturalisations," by Han Nicolaas (Nov. 22, 2005).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/mens-maatschappij/bevolking/publicaties/artikelen/2005-1829-wm.htm

B. "Top ten male and female dominated occupations," by Ingrid Beckers (Nov. 22, 2005).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/arbeid-inkomen-sociale-zekerheid/arbeidsmarkt/publicaties/artikelen/2005-1825-wm.htm

C. "Tenants feel less healthy, by Ferdy Otten, Jose Geurts, Jetty Dalstra and Anton Kunst (Nov. 24, 2005).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/mens-maatschappij/gezondheid-welzijn/publicaties/artikelen/2005-1731-wm.htm

D. "Fewer people claiming benefits" (Nov. 25, 2005).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/arbeid-inkomen-sociale-zekerheid/sociale-zekerheid/publicaties/persberichten/2005-136-pb.htm

E. "Spending on education 4 percent up," by Sue Westerman (Nov. 29, 2005).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/mens-maatschappij/onderwijs/publicaties/artikelen/2005-1817-wm.htm

F. "Lowest hourly wage rises for ten years," by Antwan Vos (Nov. 29, 2005).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/arbeid-inkomen-sociale-zekerheid/arbeidsmarkt/publicaties/artikelen/2005-1834-wm.htm

G. "AIDS-related mortality stable," by Ingeborg Deerenberg (Nov. 29, 2005).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/mens-maatschappij/gezondheid-welzijn/publicaties/artikelen/2005-1835-wm.htm

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Norway:

Statistics Norway Articles

A. "More positive attitudes towards immigrants" (Nov. 24, 2005).

http://www.ssb.no/innvhold_en/

B. "Prisoners spent longer time in custody" (November 2005).

http://www.ssb.no/fengsling_en/

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Pakistan:

Pakistan Federal Bureau of Statistics Report: "Pakistan Social and Living Standards Measurement Survey 2004-05" (June 2005, .pdf format, 83p.).

http://www.statpak.gov.pk/depts/fbs/statistics/pslm2004-05/pslm2004-05.html

Click on "Complete Report" at the bottom of the page for link to full text.

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Poland:

Central Statistical Office Periodical: "Statistical Bulletin" (No. 10, November 2005, Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.stat.gov.pl/english/opracowania_zbiorcze/b-s/2005/10_05/index.htm

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U.K

1. U.K. Health Protection Agency Report: "Mapping the Issues: HIV and other Sexually Transmitted Infections in the United Kingdom: 2005" (November 2005, .pdf format, 115p.).

http://www.hpa.org.uk/hpa/publications/hiv_sti_2005/

2. Statistics U.K. News Release: "Family Spending: Households spend 434 pounds (744 US dollars) per week (Nov. 29, 2005).

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/cci/nugget.asp?id=284

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

_Demographic Research_ Article: Note: "_DR_ is "a free, expedited, peer-reviewed journal of the population sciences published by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research [Rostock, Germany]."

A. "Five period measures of longevity," by John Bongaarts (Vol. 13, Article 21, November 2005, .pdf format, p. 547-558).

Abstract:

This study provides a summary of recently proposed alternatives period measures of "longevity" and assesses whether empirical differences between these measures are consistent with predictions from analytic studies. Particular attention is given to the tempo effect. Three of the five period measures are virtually equal to one another in a simulated population in which mortality follows a Gompertz model with a constant rate of improvement. Similar results are observed among females in Denmark, England and Wales and Sweden in the last quarter century. However, these three measures differ substantially from the conventional period life expectancy when mortality changes over time. These findings are consistent with theoretical analysis by Bongaarts and Feeney (2002, 2003, 2005) which demonstrated that this deviation is caused by a tempo effect whose size varies with the rate of change in mortality.

B. "Why does Sweden have such high fertility?" by Jan M. Hoem (Vol. 13, Article 22, November 2005, .pdf format, p. 559-572).

Abstract:

By current European standards, Sweden has had a relatively high fertility in recent decades. During the 1980s and 1990s, the annual Total Fertility Rate (TFR) for Sweden undulated considerably around a level just under 1.8, which is a bit lower than the corresponding level in France and well above the level in West Germany. (In 2004 the Swedish TFR reached 1.76 on an upward trend.) The Swedish completed Cohort Fertility Rate (CFR) was rather constant at 2 for the cohorts that produced children in the same period; for France it stayed around 2.1 while the West-German CFR was lower and de­clined regularly to around 1.6. In this presentation, I describe the back­ground for these develop­ments and explain the unique Swedish undulation

http://www.demographic-research.org/

Click on "Enter".

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_Milbank Quarterly_ Special Centennial Issue (Vol. 83, No. 4, 2005, .pdf format). This special issue, freely available to the public, contains 34 articles covering various issues, beginning with "The Economics of Public Health and Medical Care," by Ray Lyman Wilbur (Summer 1932) and ending with "How Good Is the Quality of Health Care in the United States?" by Mark A. Schuster, Elizabeth A. McGlynn, and Robert H. Brook (Fall 1998).

http://www.milbank.org/8304.html

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Population Reference Bureau Article: "Obstacles Remain to Wide Adoption of Female Condom," by Heidi Worley (November 2005).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/05_Articles/Obstacles_Remain_to_Wide_Adoption_of_Female_Condom.htm

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The Brookings Institution, Metropolitan Policy Program Reports:

A. "Who Lives Downtown?" by Eugenie L. Birch (November 2005, .pdf format, 20p.).

http://www.brookings.edu/metro/pubs/20051115_birch.htm

B. "Metro America in the New Century: Metropolitan and Central City: Demographic Shifts Since 2000," by William H. Frey (Living Cities Census Series, September 2005, .pdf format, 27p.).

http://www.brookings.edu/metro/pubs/20050906_metroamerica.pdf

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Kaiser Family Foundation Factsheet: "State Fiscal Conditions and Medicaid" (Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, November 2005, .pdf format, 2p.).

http://www.kff.org/medicaid/4087-04.cfm

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Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health National Center for Children in Poverty Reports:

A. "Marriage Not Enough to Guarantee Economic Security," by Heather Koball and Ayana Douglas-Hall (September 2005, .pdf format, 8p.).

Abstract:

More than one in four children with married parents is low income. The majority of low-income children in rural and suburban areas live with parents who are married, and most single parents were formerly married as well. The majority of married low-income parents are employed, and 41 percent of their children have two employed parents. Illness and disability are commmon reasons for unemployment. Low wages, lack of employee benefits, frequent moves, and low levels of education are common among these parents, and their need for public health insurance and food stamps is rising.

http://www.nccp.org/pub_mne05.html

B. "Children in Urban Areas are Increasingly Low Income," (November 2005, .pdf format, 4p.).

http://www.nccp.org/pub_cua05.html

More information about NCCP:

http://www.nccp.org/about.html

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Center on Budget and Policy Priorities Report: "Hardship Indicators Point to a Difficult Holiday Season: National Policy Response is Off Kilter," by Arloc Sherman and Isaac Shapiro (November 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 10p.).

http://www.cbpp.org/11-21-05pov.htm

More information on CBPP:

http://www.cbpp.org/info.html

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Political Economy Research Institute [University of Massachusetts-Amherst] Report: "Decent Work in America" (October 2005, .pdf format, 13p.). The report is linked to from a PERI news release: "New Study on Work Environmnent in U.S. Includes First Ever National Index to Rank Each State on How Workers are Treated" (Oct. 25, 2005).

http://www.umass.edu/peri/resources/wei/pressrelease.htm

More information on PERI:

http://www.umass.edu/peri/aboutus/theinstitute.htm

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Monographs on the Demography of India (K.K. Agencies):

A. _Fertility Transition in South India_, edited by Christophe Z. Guilmoto and S. Irudaya Rajan (2005, 452p., ISBN 8178294184). For more information see:

https://www.kkagencies.com/toc/35608.htm

B. _Population Growth in India_, by B.S. Yadav, Mahesh K. Jain and Kaynat Tabassum (2005, 230p., ISBN 8183290035). For more information see:

https://www.kkagencies.com/home.htm

Search title on "Population Growth in India" (without the quotes).

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_British Medical Journal_ Article Abstract: "Psychosocial effects of the 2001 UK foot and mouth disease epidemic in a rural population: qualitative diary based study," by Maggie Mort, Ian Convery, Josephine Baxter, and Cathy Bailey (Vol. 331, No. 7527, Nov. 26, 2005, p. 1234-1238).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/abstract/331/7527/1234

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_Lancet_ Viewpoint: Note: _Lancet_ requires free registration before providing content. "What would Malthus say about AIDS in Africa?" by John Cleland and Steven Sinding (Vol. 366, No. 9500, HMTL and .pdf format, p. 1899-1901). This article is freely available to the public.

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140673605676039/fulltext

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Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info for Health Pop. Reporter (vol. 5, no. 48, Nov. 28, 2005). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

Note: January 2004 - present Pop. Reporter is available via CD-ROM. Contact Ghazaleh Samandari at gsamanda@jhuccp.org with your request and complete mailing address.

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WORKING PAPERS:

University of Michigan Population Studies Center:

A. "Continuity and Change in Premarital Sexual Behavior in Vietnam," by Sharon Ghuman, Vu Manh Loi, Vu Tuan Huy, and John Knodel (PSC Research Report No. 05-585, November 2005, .pdf format, 16p.).

Abstract:

We examine trends in premarital sexual behavior in the Red River Delta and Ho Chi Minh city and surrounding environs in Vietnam using data collected in 2003-2004 from men and women married during three different periods in Vietnamese history. We also describe levels of premarital sex by type of sexual partner (spouse or non-spouse) and with whom individuals first have sex. The recent increases in premarital sex among men in the Red River Delta have led to convergence in the levels of premarital sex between northern and southern Vietnam, although there are important regional differences in whether men have sex before marriage with someone other than their future wife. Women are considerably less likely to report having had premarital sex than men. The findings are compared to those from other recent surveys conducted in Vietnam, and their implications for the spread of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the measurement of related behaviors in surveys are considered.

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.html?ID=4036

Click on PDF icon for link to full text.

B. "Family Size, Demographic Change, and Educational Attainment: The Case of Brazil," by Leticia Marteleto (PSC Research Report No. 05-584, November 2005, .pdf format, 21p.).

Abstract:

Brazilian families have changed dramatically over the past decades, particularly in regard to family size. For example, among 14 year olds, the 1963 cohort had 5.4 siblings on average, while the 1983 cohort had 2.3 siblings. This paper investigates the effects of family size on schooling of cohorts of children born pre- and post- demographic transition. Analyses of nationally representative data show that children benefit from small family sizes in both cohorts. Fertility decline has benefited education through changes in children's distribution across family sizes, not from a decrease in the negative association between family size and schooling.

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.html?ID=4037

Click on PDF icon for link to full text.

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Census Bureau: "Analysis of Multiple Origin Reporting to the Hispanic Origin Question in Census 2000," by Roberto R. Ramirez (Working Paper No. 77, November 2005, HTML format, with tables in Microsoft Excel and .pdf format).

Abstract:

This working paper examines people who reported more than one origin in response to the Census 2000 question on Hispanic origin. The demographic characteristics, as well as the geographic distribution, of this population is analyzed. Particular attention is paid to people who reported non-Hispanic and at least one Hispanic origin.

http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0077.html

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National Bureau of Economic Research: "From the Cradle to the Labor Market? The Effect of Birth Weight on Adult Outcomes," by Sandra E. Black, Paul J. Devereux, and Kjell Salvanes (w11796, November 2005, .pdf format, 56p.).

Abstract:

Lower birth weight babies have worse outcomes, both short-run in terms of one-year mortality rates and longer run in terms of educational attainment and earnings. However, recent research has called into question whether birth weight itself is important or whether it simply reflects other hard-to-measure characteristics. By applying within twin techniques using a unique dataset from Norway, we examine both short-run and long-run outcomes for the same cohorts. We find that birth weight does matter; very small short-run fixed effect estimates can be misleading because longer-run effects on outcomes such as height, IQ, earnings, and education are significant and similar in magnitude to OLS estimates. Our estimates suggest that eliminating birth weight differences between socio-economic groups would have sizeable effects on the later outcomes of children from poorer families.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11796

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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research [Rostock, Germany]:

A. "The Importance of Mortality Tempo-Adjustment: Theoretical and Empirical Considerations," by Marc Luy (WP 2005-035, November 2005, .pdf format, 34p.).

Abstract:

Bongaarts and Feeney's papers on tempo distortions stirred the world of demographers and divided their community into tempo supporters and tempo opponents. The number of scholars following the tempo approach in fertility continues to grow, whereas tempo-adjustment in mortality still is generally rejected. This rejection is irrational in principle, as the basic idea behind the tempo approach is independent of the kind of demographic event. Whereas tempo adjustments in the TFR mainly lead to higher estimates on the hypothetical family size under current fertility conditions, this paper shows that tempo-adjustments in life expectancy can provide a very different picture of current mortality conditions compared to conventional life expectancy. An application of the Bongaarts and Feeney method to the analysis of the mortality gap between western and eastern Germany yields remarkable results: The differences in survival conditions between the two regions still are considerably higher than generally expected, and the survival gap between the two entities began to narrow some years later than trends in conventional life expectancy suggest. Since life expectancy without adjustment for tempo effects is one of the demographic tools most frequently used to analyze mortality, the conclusion is that we may need to revise our current knowledge of mortality trends and the driving factors behind them.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2005-035.pdf

B. "Economic Uncertainty and Fertility Postponement: Evidence From German Panel Data," by Michaela Kreyenfeld (WP-2005-034, November 2005, .pdf format, 32p.).

Abstract:

This paper investigates whether economic uncertainty induces a postponement of family formation. We use data from the German Socio-Economic Panel which provides longitudinal information of economic uncertainty and fertility for the period 1984 to 2004. We employ ~Qobjective' measures of uncertainty (unemployment, fixed-term contract, low income) as well as ~Qsubjective' measures (the feeling that the personal economic situation is insecure). Our results suggest that there is no clear indication that economic uncertainty generally leads to a postponement of parenthood. More highly educated women tend to postpone family formation when unemployed or when they feel insecure about their personal economic situation. However, women with low educational levels accommodate themselves quite readily with motherhood when subject to labor market insecurities.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2005-034.pdf

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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "Oppositional Identities and the Labor Market," by Harminder Battu, McDonald Mwale, and Yves Zenou (Discussion Paper No. 1852, November 2005, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

We develop a model in which non-white individuals are defined with respect to their social environment (family, friends, neighbors) and their attachments to their culture of origin (religion, language), and in which jobs are mainly found through social networks. We find that, depending on how strong peer pressures are, nonwhites choose to adopt "oppositional" identities since some individuals may identify with the dominant culture and others may reject that culture, even if it implies adverse labor market outcomes.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1852.pdf

B. "Crime and Police Resources: The Street Crime Initiative," by Stephen Machin and Olivier Marie (Discussion Paper No. 1853, November 2005, .pdf format, 38p.).

Abstract:

In this paper we look at links between police resources and crime in a different way to the existing economics of crime work. To do so we focus on a large-scale policy intervention--the Street Crime Initiative--that was introduced in England and Wales in 2002. This allocated additional resources to some police force areas to combat street crime, whereas other forces did not receive any additional funding. Estimates derived from several empirical strategies show that robberies fell significantly in SCI police forces relative to non-SCI forces after the initiative was introduced. Moreover, the policy seems to have been a cost effective one, even after allowing for possible displacement or diffusion effects onto other crimes and adjacent areas. There is some heterogeneity in this positive net social benefit across different SCI police forces, suggesting that some police forces may have made better use of the extra resources than others. Overall, we reach the conclusion that increased police resources do in fact lead to lower crime, at least in the context of the SCI programme we study.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1853.pdf

C. "Why Is the Timing of School Tracking So Heterogeneous?," by Kenn Ariga, Giorgio Brunello, Roki Iwahashi, and Lorenzo Rocco (Discussion Paper No. 1854, November 2005, .pdf format, 34p.).

Abstract:

Secondary schools in the developed world differ in the degree of differentiation and in the first age of selection of pupils into different tracks. In this paper, we account for the heterogeneity of tracking time with a simple stochastic model which conjugates the returns from specialization with the costs of early selection. We calibrate the model for 20 countries--including most of Europe, the US and Japan--and show that the model performs rather well in replicating the observed heterogeneity, with the remarkable exception of Germany.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1854.pdf

D. "Gender, Time Use and Public Policy over the Life Cycle," by Patricia Apps and Ray Rees (Discussion Paper No. 1855, November 2005, .pdf format, 36p.).

Abstract:

In this paper we compare gender differences in the allocation of time to market work, domestic work, child care, and leisure over the life cycle. Time use profiles for these activity categories are constructed on survey data for three countries: Australia, the UK and Germany. We discuss the extent to which gender differences and life cycle variation in time use can be explained by public policy, focusing on the tax treatment of the female partner and on access to high quality, affordable child care. Profiles of time use, earnings and taxes are compared over the life cycle defined on age as well as on phases that represent the key transitions in the life cycle of a typical household. Our contention is that, given the decision to have children, life cycle time use and consumption decisions of households are determined by them and by public policy. Before children arrive, the adult members of the household have high labour supplies and plenty of leisure. The presence of pre-school children, in combination with the tax treatment of the second earner's income and the cost of bought-in child care, dramatically change the pattern of time use, leading to large falls in female labour supply. We also highlight the fact that, in the three countries we study, female labour supply exhibits a very high degree of heterogeneity after the arrival of children, and we show that this has important implications for public policy.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1855.pdf

E. "An Analysis of the Impact of Affirmative Action Programs on Self-Employment in the Construction Industry," by David G. Blanchflower and Jon Wainwright (Discussion Paper No. 1856, November 2005, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

The main findings of this paper are that despite the existence of various affirmative action programs designed to improve the position of women and minorities in public construction, little has changed in the last twenty five years. We present evidence showing that where race conscious affirmative action programs exist they appear to generate significant improvements: when these programs are removed or replaced with race-neutral programs the utilization of minorities and women in public construction declines rapidly. We show that the programs have not helped minorities to become self-employed or to raise their earnings over the period 1979-2004, using data from the Current Population Survey and the Census, but have improved the position of white females. There has been a growth in incorporated self-employment rates of white women in construction such that currently their rate is significantly higher than that of white men. The data are suggestive of the possibility that some of these companies are 'fronts' which are actually run by their white male spouses or sons to take advantage of the affirmative action programs.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1856.pdf

F. "Do Men and Women-Economists Choose the Same Research Fields? Evidence from Top-50 Departments," by Juan Jose Dolado, Florentino Felgueroso, and Miguel Almunia (Discussion Paper No. 1859, November 2005, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

This paper describes the gender distribution of research fields chosen by the faculty members in the top fifty Economics departments, according to the rankings available on the Econphd.net website. We document that women are unevenly distributed across fields and test some behavioral implications from theories underlying such disparities. Our main findings are that the probability that a woman chooses a given field is positively related to the share of women in that field (path-dependence), and that the share of women in a field at a given department increases with the sizes of the department and field, while it decreases with their average quality. However, these patterns seem to be changing for younger female faculty members. Further, by using Ph.D. cohorts, we document how gender segregation across fields has evolved over the last four decades.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1859.pdf

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Center for Economic Studies/Ifo Institute for Economic Research (CESifo) [University of Munich, Germany]: "Gender and Ethnicity--Married Immigrants in Britain," by Christian Dustmann and Francesca Fabbri (Working Paper No. 1598, November 2005, .pdf format, 45p.).

Abstract:

In this paper we investigate the economic activity of married or cohabiting female immigrants in Britain. We distinguish between two immigrant groups: foreign-born females who belong to an ethnic minority group and their husbands, and foreign-born white females and their husbands. We compare these to native-born white women and their husbands. Our analysis deviates from the usual mean analysis and investigates employment, hours worked and earnings for males and females, as well as their combined family earnings, along the distribution of husbands' economic potential. We analyse the extent to which economic disadvantage may be reinforced at the household level and investigate to what extent it can be explained by differences in observable characteristics. We find that white female immigrants and their husbands have an overall advantage in earnings over white native born, both individually and at the household level. Minority immigrants do less well, in particular at the lower end of the husband's economic potential distribution. This is mainly due to the low employment of both genders, which leads to a disadvantage in earnings, intensified at the household level. Only part of this differential can be explained by observable characteristics.

http://www.cesifo.de/portal/page?_pageid=36,302752&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL&p_file_id=12081

Click on "Download PDF" at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

Other Journals:

American Journal of Epidemiology (Vol. 162, No. 11, Dec. 1, 2005).

http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol162/issue11/index.dtl?etoc

Journal of Social Work (Vol. 5, No. 3, December 2005).

http://jsw.sagepub.com/content/vol5/issue3/

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CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS:

National Center for Health Statistics: "Monitoring the Public's Health: Using Data from the National Center for Health Statistics," a pre-conference workshop to be held on Dec. 10, 2006, at this year's American Public Health Association Convention, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. For more information see:

http://apha.confex.com/apha/133am/techprogram/session_16584.htm

For more on APHA convention see:

http://www.apha.org/meetings/

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National Leadership Summit on Eliminating Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health, to be held on Jan. 9-11, 2006, in Washington D.C. For more information see:

http://www.OMHSummit2006.org

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Kaiser Family Foundation Conference Coverage: "4th MIM Pan-African Malaria Conference," held Nov. 13-18, 2005 in Yaound, Cameroon. Coverage includes webcasts and transcripts among other features.

http://www.kaisernetwork.org/mim/index.cfm

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STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES:

University of Minnesota Population Center: "The Minnesota Population Center at the University of Minnesota is recruiting graduate students to work on several projects to develop new demographic data sources. These projects include: The Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS-USA), an individual-level database of U.S. censuses from 1850 to 2000, including projects to create samples for 1880, 1900 and 1930; and, IPUMS International, a data series incorporating international census microdata for the period 1960 to the present." For more information see:

http://www.pop.umn.edu/employment/grads.shtml

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Erasmus Mundus Master (European Union): "PhoenixEM Dynamics of Health and Welfare". For more information, including application information see:

http://mundus-healthwelfare.ehess.fr/

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Special Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research Summer Program Course: "Longitudinal Analysis of Historical Demographic Data," to be held in Ann Arbor Michigan, Jul. 24- Aug. 18, 2005. "Learn to work effectively with individual-level longitudinal data.Genealogies and population registers raise fundamental issues about censoring and incomplete information that can be applied to all kinds of life histories. Examine current problems in historical research. Historical demography contributes to current debates, such as Barker's 'fetal programming' hypothesis and household dynamics in the complex families of East Asia, as well as classic problems like the demographic transition. Apply event history analysis and other statistical methods to historical sources from Europe,North America, and Asia. Manage longitudinal data to construct time-varying covariates, contextual variables, and other data structures required for event history analysis. Applications for this Special Summer Program are competitive. Application deadline is April 21, 2006. For more information on the course, fee waivers, and travel grants, contact Susan Hautaniemi Leonard at:

hautanie@umich.edu.

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International Union for the Scientific Study of Population: "International seminar on Longevity: Early-life Conditions, Social Mobility and Other Factors that Influence Survival to Old Age: Call for Junior Demographer--Junior Demographer Travel Grant." "The IUSSP Scientific Committee on Historical Demography invites applications for junior demographers to attend the IUSSP seminar on Longevity: Early-life Conditions, Social Mobility and Other Factors that Influence Survival to Old Age, organized by the Scientific Committee on Historical Demography. The seminar will be held in Lund, Sweden, on 8-10 June 2006, in collaboration with the Research Group in Economic Demography, Lund University." For more information see:

http://www.iussp.org/Activities/scc-his2/his2-jundem06a.php

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research [Rostock, Germany]: "The Laboratory of Demographic Data of the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany is seeking a research scientist to work in the field of fertility and its determinants in Europe. For further information and application see":

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/?http://www.demogr.mpg.de/jobs/

Click on "Research Scientist" (.pdf format, 1p.).

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Penn State Population Research Institute: "Postdoctoral Positions - Research Training in the Demography of Aging." "Pending renewal funding, the Population Research Institute (PRI) at Penn State University expects to have two postdoctoral positions for research training in the demography of aging available beginning in summer 2006. This program has been funded by a training grant from the National Institute on Aging over the past 15 years. Postdoctoral positions are for one year, with re-appointment typically occurring for a second year, and provide a yearly stipend commensurate with experience, based on levels mandated by NIH." For more information see:

http://www.pop.psu.edu/general/postdoc/postdoc_position.htm

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Michigan State University: "The Department of Sociology at Michigan State University seeks applications for a tenure-stream assistant professor position in the demography.  We are especially interested in a demographer with a research program in health, family and/or environment with secondary interests in community or inequality. For more information see (.pdf format, 1p.):

http://www.soc.msu.edu/quality%20fund%20position%20in%20assistant%20prof%20demography.pdf

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LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES:

US House Government Reform Committee Hearing Publication: "The Next Flu Pandemic: Evaluating U.S. Readiness," a hearing held Jun. 30, 2005 (House Serial Publication 109-49, ASCII text and .pdf format, 188p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/house07ch109.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "109-49" (without the quotes).

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DATA:

Census Bureau:

A. American Community Survey Update: "The U.S. Census Bureau has released over 600 additional base tables from the 2004 ACS [American Community Survey]. Included are 258 new base tables as well as race iterations of most of the tables released last August. Some of the new tables include: median age by residence one year ago; place of birth by language spoken at home and ability to speak English; place of birth by marital status; means of transportation to work by industry; and median monthly housing costs. Also featured in this release are Subject Tables, a new ACS data product. They are similar to the Census 2000 Quick Tables, but contain much more detail than Quick Tables. Subject tables display percent distributions rather than the estimates. Universe lines are displayed as numeric estimates to show the base of each distribution. Subject tables allow for other measures such as medians and means where appropriate, and include the imputation rates for relevant measures. The Bureau has issued subject tables in 42 subject areas, including education, employment, poverty, income, language, and housing." The data is available via the Bureau's " Factfinder" web data extractor.

http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/DatasetMainPageServlet?_program=ACS&_lang=en&_ts=150362838515

B. "Small Area Income & Poverty Estimates." Estimates of population and poverty for school districts, as well as income and poverty estimates for states and counties. Included are estimates of the number of poor children ages 5 to 17 in the nations 15,000 school districts."

http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/saipe/index.html

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National Center for Health Statistics:

A. "Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) Linked Mortality File: 2005 Release (November 2005)." "NCHS has completed a mortality update for the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) Mortality Study (1992), which includes new record linkages of adult NHANES II participants with death records from the National Death Index (NDI). This new resource allows researchers the opportunity to conduct a vast array of outcome studies designed to investigate the associations of a wide variety of health and risk factors with mortality. This updated mortality file is comprehensive in design so that it contains death information for deaths ascertained as part of the 1992 NHANES II Mortality Study as well as new deaths identified with the new probabilistic linkage with the NDI through December 31, 2000. Due to confidentiality requirements, access to this file is available only through the NCHS Research Data Center (RDC). The NCHS RDC offers on-site and remote access capabilities. Interested researchers must submit an application to the NCHS RDC. For more information on the RDC application process, see":

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/r&d/rdc.htm

For more information about the file see:

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/r&d/nchs_datalinkage/nhanesii_data_linkage_activities.htm

B. "NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study (NHEFS) Linked Mortality File: 2005 Release" (November 2005). "NCHS has completed a mortality update for NHEFS, which includes new record linkages of NHEFS participants to death records from the National Death Index (NDI). This new resource allows researchers the opportunity to conduct a vast array of outcome studies designed to investigate the association of a wide variety of health and risk factors collected over time with subsequent mortality. The updated mortality file is comprehensive in design so that it contains death information for deaths ascertained during the NHEFS data collection follow-up survey periods in 1982-84, 1986, 1987, and 1992, as well as new deaths identified through probabilistic record linkages with the NDI. The current NHEFS Linked Mortality file contains death information for all NHEFS participants identified as deceased as of December 31, 2000. Due to confidentiality requirements, access to this file is available only through the NCHS Research Data Center (RDC). The NCHS RDC offers on-site and remote access capabilities. Interested researchers must submit an application to the NCHS RDC. For more information on the RDC application process, see":

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/r&d/rdc.htm

For more information about the file see:

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/r&d/nchs_datalinkage/nhefs_data_linkage_activities.htm

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Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Survey, 2005 (#4312)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04312.xml

Uniform Crime Reports [United States]: Supplementary Homicide Reports, 1976-2003 (#4351)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04351.xml

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Depression, Wave 2, 1997-2000 (#13614)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/13614.xml

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Dysthymia, Wave 2, 1997-2000 (#13616)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/13616.xml

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Family Legal Update, Wave 2, 1997-2000 (#13622)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/13622.xml

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Family Suicide Interview, Wave 2, 1997-2000 (#13623)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/13623.xml

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Lifetime (Primary Caregiver), Wave 2, 1997-2000 (#13646)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/13646.xml

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UK Data Archive (Essex University, Colchester, UK): The UK Data Archive has recently added the following dataset to its holdings. Note: There may be charges or licensing requirements on holdings of the UK Data Archive. For more information see:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/

SN 5278 -2001 Census Household Sample of Anonymised Records (SARs): Special Licence Access

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5278

SN 5270 -Maternity and Paternity Rights in Britain, 2002: Survey of Parents

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5270

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WEBSITES OF INTEREST:

KaiserEdu.org Update:

A. KaiserEdu.org Update: Kaiser Family Foundation's educational arm, originally discussed in CDERR #26, Apr. 5, 2004 (http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cde/library/cderr/cderr26.htm#websites) has added the following items:

"Emergency Contraception Issue Module"

http://www.kaiseredu.org/topics_im.asp?id=400&imID=1&parentID=72

"Factsheet on Emergency Contraception (November 2005, .pdf format, 2p.).

http://www.kff.org/womenshealth/3344-03.cfm

KaiserEdu.org:

http://www.kaiseredu.org/

B. Kaiser Family Foundation statehealthfacts.org Update: Kaiser has recently updated this website. The following tables have been added:

http://statehealthfacts.org/cgi-bin/healthfacts.cgi?action=whatsnew

Tables from Nov. 3, 2005 - Nov. 16, 2005 are either new or have been updated.

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-- Jack Solock
Data Librarian--
Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu