Current Demographic Research Report #109, November 14, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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CDERR is compiled and edited by Jack Solock, Kristin Wick, and Charlie Fiss of the University of Wisconsin Center for Demography and Ecology Information Services Center.

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NOTE! Index Items marked with *** indicate there are related articles. Articles can be found with the item in the body of the report. We cannot guarantee the permanence of related article addresses. They may be available in Lexis-Nexis, ProQuest Newspapers. Check your organization's library.

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Index to this issue:

CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

U.S.

Census Bureau Reports

Centers for Disease Control Reports, Article***

National Institutes of Health News Release: "Increasing Evidence Points to Link Between Youth Smoking and Exposure to Smoking in Movies"

Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Reports

Department of State Compendium: _International Religious Freedom: 2005_***

Bureau of Labor Statistics Periodical" _Monthly Labor Review_

National Center for Education Statistics: "Participation in Adult Education for Work-Related Reasons: 2002-03"

Bureau of Justice Statistics Reports***

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U.S.--California:

California Department of Finance, Demographic Research Unit Report: " California Public K-12 Enrollment and High School Graduate Projections by County--2005 Series"

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U.S.--New Jersey:

New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development Compendium: "New Jersey Annual Demographic Profile--1990-2005"

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U.S.--Washington:

Washington Office of Financial Management Report: "Forecast of the State Population by Age and Sex: 1990 to 2030 [Annual] November 2005 Forecast"***

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World Health Organization News Release: ""Massive international effort stops polio epidemic across 10 West and Central African countries"***

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United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Policy Brief: "An effective regional response to the threat of a pandemic"

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Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Monograph: _Health at a Glance - OECD Indicators 2005_.

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Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Brochure: "Gender, Health and Development in the Americas 2005"

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Canada

Statistics Canada/Statistique Canada Report: "International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey, 2003"***

Canadian Institute for Health Information/Institut canadien d'information sur la sante (CIHI/ICIS) Report: "Preliminary Provincial and Territorial Government Health Expenditure Estimates 1974-1975 to 2005-2006"***

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Israel:

Central Bureau of Statistics Report: "National Expenditure on Health, 1962-2004"

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Netherlands:

Statistics Netherlands press release: "Declining birth rate puts the brakes on population growth"

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Romania:

National Institute of Statistics Compendium: _Romanian Statistical Yearbook - 2004 time series 1990 - 2003_

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U.K.

National Statistics UK: "Life expectancy at birth by health and local authorities in the United Kingdom 1991-1993 to 2002-2004"***

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

_Demographic Research_ Article: "Tempo and its Tribulations"

Kaiser Family Foundation Report: "Sex on TV 4"***

Urban Institute Article, Reports

Employee Benefit Research Institute: "Sources of Health Insurance and Characteristics of the Uninsured: Analysis of the March 2005 Current Population Survey"

The Williams Project on Sexual Orientation Law and Public Policy, UCLA School of Law Reports

Sexuality Information and Education Council of the U.S. (SIECUS) Report: " SIECUS PEPFAR (President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief) Country Profiles: Focusing on Prevention and Youth"

University of Chicago Monograph: _The Total Survey Error Approach_

Info for Health Pop. Reporter

WORKING PAPERS

University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Demography and Ecology
California Center for Population Research
Rand Corporation
Labor and Population Program
Population Council Research Division
Economic Growth Center (Yale University)
United Nations Development Programme
International Poverty Centre
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population (McMaster University)

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Other Journals

CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS

Population Association of America

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Luxembourg Income Study

DATA

Panel Study for Income Dynamics
Medical Expenditure Panel Study
Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
UK Data Archive

WEBSITES OF INTEREST

Kaiser Family Foundation: Medicaid Factsheets and Database

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

U.S.:

1. Census Bureau Reports:

A. "Population Profile of the United States: Dynamic Version," (November, 2005, .pdf format, 71p.). Available only on the Internet, this publication will be updated as new research is released. Individual chapters on a variety of demographic, housing and economic topics based on population estimates, the Current Population Survey, the Survey of Income and Program Participation and the American Housing Survey. Most data are at the national level, with graphics and tables containing a limited amount of data at the state, county and city levels. Internet address:

http://www.census.gov/population/www/pop-profile/profile.html

B. "Participation of Mothers in Government Assistance Programs," by Terry A. Lugaila (Household Economic Studies, P70-102, November, 2005, .pdf format, 13p.).

C. "Maternity Leave and Employment Patterns of First-Time Mothers: 1961-2000," by Julia Overturf Johnson and Barbara Downs (Household Economic Studies, P70-103, November, 2005, .pdf format, 18p.).

D. "Who's Minding the Kids? Child Care Arrangements: Winter 2002," by Julia Overturf Johnson (Household Economic Studies, P70-101, October 2005, .pdf format, 21p.).

"B", "C", and "D" above can all be accessed from a Census Bureau news release: "Census Bureau Today Releases Three Reports Pertaining to Mothers" (Nov. 9, 2005).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/families_households/005934.html

Click on .pdf links for links to full text.

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2. Center for Disease Control Reports:

A. "HIV Testing in the United States, 2002," by John E. Anderson, Anjani Chandra, and William D. Mosher (_Advance Data from Vital and Health Statistics_, No. 363, November 8, 2005, .pdf format, 32p.).

Abstract:

A new report shows national estimates of HIV testing from the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) and two other CDC surveys. The data show both marked progress since the earlier survey in 1995, and a significant number of persons at risk of HIV who appear to need testing and counseling for HIV. They also show the status of testing in the United States just before the 2003 CDC initiative to increase testing and counseling as part of HIV prevention efforts.The main source of the data in the report is the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), a national survey of 12,571 men and women 15-44 years of age in the United States. The findings in this report include the most detailed and specific portrait of HIV testing in the U.S. population ever published using a national sample.

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/pubs/pubd/ad/361-370/ad363.htm

Click on "View/download PDF" for full text.

B. "STD Surveillance 2004," (November 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 7p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats/

Related news release: "New CDC Data Show Syphilis Increasing in Men," (news release, Nov. 8, 2005).

http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/r051108.htm

Related articles:

"Gay Sex Called Key to Rise in Syphilis," by Thomas H. Maugh II (_Los Angeles Times_ via _Newsday_ [Long Island, New York, Nov. 9, 2005). http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-sci-std9nov09,0,4230327.story

"Cities see rise of STDs: Officials report disturbing surge in syphilis, chlamydia," by Delthia Ricks (_Newsday_ [Long Island, New York, Nov. 9, 2005). http://www.newsday.com/news/health/ny-hs4504480nov09,0,6593707.story

C. "Cigarette Smoking Among Adults --- United States, 2004," by E. Maurice, A. Trosclair, R. Merritt, R. Caraballo, A. Malarcher, C. Husten, and T. Pechacek (_Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_, Vol. 54, No. 44, Nov. 11, 2005, .HTML and .pdf format, p. 1121-1124).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5444a2.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5444.pdf

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3. National Institutes of Health News Release: "Increasing Evidence Points to Link Between Youth Smoking and Exposure to Smoking in Movies" (Nov. 7, 2005).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/nov2005/nci-07b.htm

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4. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Reports:

A. "Substance Use, Dependence, and Treatment Among Veterans" (National Survey on Drug Use and Health, November 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.)>

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k5/vets/vets.cfm

B. "Alcohol Use and Alcohol Related Risk Behaviors Among Veterans" (National Survey on Drug Use and Health, November 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k5/vetsAlc/vetsAlc.cfm

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5. Bureau of Labor Statistics Periodical" _Monthly Labor Review_ (Vol. 128, No. 10, October 2005, .pdf format).

http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/mlrhome.htm

Note: This is a temporary address. When the next _MLR_ is released, this one, along with all others back to 1982, will be available at:

http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/archive.htm

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6. Department of State Compendium: _International Religious Freedom: 2005_ (November 2005).

http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/irf/2005/

Related article: "State Department Set to Cite Saudi Arabia," by Barry Scheid (Associated Press via _Washington Post_, Nov. 7, 2005). Note: _WP_ requires free registration before providing articles. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/11/07/AR2005110701251.html

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7. National Center for Education Statistics: "Participation in Adult Education for Work-Related Reasons: 2002-03," by Brian Kleiner, Priscilla Carver, Mary Hagedorn, and Christopher Chapman (NCES 2006040, November 2005, .pdf format, 68p.).

Abstract:

The report summarizes data collected through the Adult Education for Work-Related Reasons survey fielded in 2003 as part of the National Household Education Surveys. The survey asked a random sample of adults about their work-related educational activities and experiences over the previous 12-months. The survey defined work-related activities in terms of formal and informal learning activities that are done for reasons related to work. Findings from the survey reveal that 40 percent of adults in the nation participated in some type of formal adult education for work-related reasons during a 12-month period in 2002-03. Thirty-three percent participated in work-related courses, 9 percent were in a college degree program, 2 percent were in a vocational degree/diploma program, and 1 percent had an apprenticeship. Fifty-eight percent of adults participated in informal work-related learning activities.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006040

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8. Bureau of Justice Statistics Reports:

A. "Capital Punishment, 2004," by Thomas P. Bonczar and Tracy L. Snell (NCJ 211349, November 2005, ASCII text and .pdf format, 17p., with .zip compressed spreadsheets).

Abstract:

Presents characteristics of persons under sentence of death on December 31, 2004, and of persons executed in 2004. Preliminary data on executions by States during 2005 are included, and the report summarizes the movement of prisoners into and out of death sentence status during 2004. Numerical tables present data on offenders' sex, race, Hispanic origin, education, marital status, age at time of arrest for capital offense, legal status at time of capital offense, methods of execution, trends, and time between imposition of death sentence and execution.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/cp04.htm

Related article: "Capital punishment declines," by Andrew Bridges (Associated Press via _Indianpolis [Indiana] Star_, Nov. 14, 2005). http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051114/NEWS06/511140405/1012

B. "Hate Crimes Reported by Victims and Police," by Caroline Wolf Harlow (NCJ 209911, November 2005, ASCII text and .pdf format, 12p., with .zip compressed spreadsheets).

Abstract:

Provides information on the number of hate crimes reported to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and their characteristics. This BJS Special Report uses data from victims' reports to the NCVS from July 2000 through December 2003 and from police reports to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program (UCR) in 2002 to describe characteristics of hate crimes. Information is provided on the motivations for hate crime as perceived by victims, the types of crimes which victims thought were hate-related, reasons for reporting or not reporting hate crimes to police, police response to victim's notification of a crime, the time and place at which hate crimes occurred and offenders' gender, race, age, relationship to the victim, use of weapons, and gang membership. Rates of hate crime are presented for victims by gender, race, ethnicity, age and other characteristics. The report also compares results from the NCVS and the UCR on motivations for hate crime, the types of crimes that involve hate, and the characteristics of victims and offenders.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/hcrvp.htm

Related article: "In hate crimes, racism is likeliest motive," by Mark Sherman (Associated Press via _Seattle [Washington] Post-Intelligencer, Nov. 14, 2005). http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/national/1110AP_FBI_Hate_Crimes.html

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U.S.--California:

California Department of Finance, Demographic Research Unit Report: " California Public K-12 Enrollment and High School Graduate Projections by County--2005 Series," by Evaon Schnagl (November 2005, Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.dof.ca.gov/HTML/DEMOGRAP/K12g_04.htm

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U.S.--New Jersey:

New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development Compendium: "New Jersey Annual Demographic Profile--1990-2005" (October 2005, .pdf and Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.wnjpin.net/OneStopCareerCenter/LaborMarketInformation/lmi19/index.html

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U.S.--Washington:

Washington Office of Financial Management Report: "Forecast of the State Population by Age and Sex: 1990 to 2030 [Annual] November 2005 Forecast" (November 2005, Microsoft Excel format with technical notes in .pdf format).

http://www.ofm.wa.gov/pop/stfc/index.htm

Related article: "More jobs, so more people," by Cecilia Kang (_Seattle Post-Intelligencer_, Nov. 11, 2005). http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/247987_popgrowth11.html

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World Health Organization News Release: ""Massive international effort stops polio epidemic across 10 West and Central African countries" (Nov. 11, 2005).

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2005/pr60/en/index.html

Related article: "Polio eradicated in 10 African Nations," by Bradley S. Klapper (Associated Press via _Globe and Mail_ [Toronto, Ontario, Canada), Nov. 11, 2005). http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20051111.wpolio1111/BNStory/specialScienceandHealth/

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United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Policy Brief: "An effective regional response to the threat of a pandemic" (Issue Brief No. 1, October 2005, .pdf format, 4p.).

http://www.unescap.org/publications/detail.asp?id=1112

Click on "View Full Text" for link to full text.

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Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Monograph: _Health at a Glance - OECD Indicators 2005_." Pricing and ordering information for this monograph are linked to from an OECD news release: "OECD countries spend only 3% of healthcare budgets on prevention, public awareness" (Nov. 8, 2005).

http://www.oecd.org/document/0/0,2340,en_2649_201185_35625856_1_1_1_1,00.html

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Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Brochure: "Gender, Health and Development in the Americas 2005" (November 2005, .pdf format, 24p.).

http://www.paho.org/English/AD/GE/GenderBrochure1.htm

Click on "PDF" for link to full text.

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Canada:

1. Statistics Canada/Statistique Canada Report: "International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey, 2003" (_The Daily_, Nov. 9, 2005). The report links to information about the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS), most recently done in 2003.

http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/051109/d051109a.htm

Click on "4406" near the bottom of the report for information about the survey.

Related article: "West is best on literacy, numbers, Statcan says: Adults in Yukon, B.C., Saskatchewan and Alberta fare better than those in East," by Jill Mahoney (_Globe and Mail_ [Toronto, Ontario], Nov. 9, 2005).

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20051110/LITERACY10/TPNational/Canada

2. Canadian Institute for Health Information/Institut canadien d'information sur la sante (CIHI/ICIS) Report: Note: CIHI/ICIS requires free registration before providing reports. "Preliminary Provincial and Territorial Government Health Expenditure Estimates 1974-1975 to 2005-2006" (November 2005, .pdf format, 96p.). The report is linked to from a CIHI/ICIS news release: "Provincial/territorial government health spending expected to reach 91.4 billion dollars [76.8 billion US dollars] in 2005-2006, reports CIHI" (Nov. 2, 2005).

http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/dispPage.jsp?cw_page=media_02nov2005_e

Click on report title at the bottom of the news release.

Related article: "Health budgets continue to swell," by Antonella Artuso (_Sun_ [Ottawa, Ontario], Nov. 4, 2005). http://ottsun.canoe.ca/News/Health/2005/11/04/1291816-sun.html

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Israel:

Central Bureau of Statistics Report: "National Expenditure on Health, 1962-2004" (October, 2005, Microsoft Excel, .pdf, and/or Microsoft Word format, 44p.).

http://www.cbs.gov.il/briut/briut06/briut06_e.htm

Click on "Print full version" for link to full text .pdf version.

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Netherlands:

Statistics Netherlands press release: "Declining birth rate puts the brakes on population growth" (Nov. 10, 2005). Note: the press release links to a more detailed press release (click on the icon at the bottom of the page, .pdf format, 4p.), with selected tables.

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/dossiers/allochtonen/publicaties/persberichten/2005-126-pb.htm

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Romania:

National Institute of Statistics Compendium: _Romanian Statistical Yearbook - 2004 time series 1990 - 2003_ (2005, .zip compressed .pdf format).

http://www.insse.ro/anuar_2004/aseng2004.htm

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U.K.

National Statistics UK: "Life expectancy at birth by health and local authorities in the United Kingdom 1991-1993 to 2002-2004" (November 2005, .pdf and Microsoft Excel format). "Life expectancy at birth results for health and local authorities in the United Kingdom are now available for 2002-2004. These figures have been added to existing trend data from 1991-1993 to 2001-2003 which have not been revised. Results are rolling averages, produced by aggregating deaths and population estimates for each three year period. Notes on the interpretation of life expectancy at birth and its calculation are contained within the report. Results for each area can be found via the links to Excel workbooks.

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/statbase/Product.asp?vlnk=8841

Related article: "Scots life expectancy UK's lowest" (British Broadcasting Corporation News, Nov. 10, 2005). http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/4424608.stm

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

_Demographic Research_ Article: Note: _DR_ is " a free, expedited, peer-reviewed journal of the population sciences" published by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research [Rostock, Germany]." "Tempo and its Tribulations," by Kenneth W. Wachter (Vol. 13, Article 9, November 2005, .pdf format, p. 201-222).

Abstract:

Bongaarts and Feeney offer alternatives to period life expectancy with a set of demographic measures equivalent to each other under a Proportionality Assumption. Under this assumption, we show that the measures are given by exponentially weighted moving averages of earlier values of period life expectancy. They are indices of mortality conditions in the recent past. The period life expectancy is an index of current mortality conditions. The difference is a difference between past and present, not a ``tempo distortion'' in the present. In contrast, the Bongaarts-Feeney tempo-adjusted Total Fertility Rate is a measure of current fertility conditions, which can be understood in terms of a process of birth-age standardization.

http://www.demographic-research.org/

Click on "Enter".

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Kaiser Family Foundation Report: "Sex on TV 4," by Dale Kunkel, Keren Eyal, Keli Finnerty, Erica Biely, and Edward Donnerstein (November 2005, .pdf format, 79p.).

According to Sex on TV 4, a biennial study by the Kaiser Family Foundation, the number of sexual scenes on television has nearly doubled since 1998. And while the inclusion of references to "safer sex" issues--such as waiting to have sex, using protection, or possible consequences of unprotected sex--has also increased since 1998, that rate has leveled off in recent years. The study examined a representative sample of more than 1,000 hours of programming including all genres other than daily newscasts, sports events, and children's shows. All sexual content was measured, including talk about sex and sexual behavior. Sex on TV 4 was released on Wednesday, November 9, 2005 at a forum in Washington, D.C. that included opening remarks by Kaiser Family Foundation President and CEO Drew Altman, a keynote speech by Senator Barack Obama, and a roundtable discussion featuring Federal Communications Commission Commissioner Kathleen Abernathy; Fox Television Networks President and CEO Tony Vinciquerra; Law & Order: SVU Executive Producer Neal Baer; behavioral scientist and RAND Corporation Researcher, Rebecca Collins; and National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy Executive Director Sarah Brown. Kaiser Family Foundation Vice President Vicky Rideout and University of Arizona Professor Dale Kunkel presented the findings.

http://www.kff.org/entmedia/entmedia110905pkg.cfm

Click on "Report" for link to full text.

Related article: "Sex scenes on TV nearly double," by Andrew Herrmann (_Chicago [Illinois] Sun-Times_, Nov. 10, 2005). http://www.suntimes.com/output/television/cst-nws-tvsex10.html

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Urban Institute Article, Reports:

A. "Undocumented Immigrants: Myths and Reality," by Randolph Capps and Michael E. Fix (November 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 2p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=900898

B. "Congressionally Mandated Evaluation of the State Children's Health Insurance Program," by Genevieve M. Kenney, Lisa Dubay, Ian Hill, Anna S. Sommers, and Stephen Zuckerman (October 2005, .pdf format, 102p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411249

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Employee Benefit Research Institute: "Sources of Health Insurance and Characteristics of the Uninsured: Analysis of the March 2005 Current Population Survey," by Paul Fronstin, EBRI Issue Brief No. 287, .pdf format, 31p.).

http://www.ebri.org/publications/ib/index.cfm?fa=ibDisp&content_id=3597

Click on "Download Issue Brief"

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The Williams Project on Sexual Orientation Law and Public Policy, UCLA School of Law Reports:

A. "Same-Sex Couples and Same-Sex Couples Raising Children in The United States: Data from Census 2000," by R. Bradley Sears, Gary Gates, and William B. Rubenstein (September 2005, .pdf format, 18p.). "This study analyses Census 2000 data about same-sex couples in the United States. The report focuses on data that indicate that: 1. Individuals in same-sex couples depend on each other economically in ways similar to individuals in different-sex couples and 2. Same-sex couples with children are more diverse than married parents and have fewer economic resources. Both sets of data indicate that same-sex couples and their families would benefit from the legal rights and obligations of marriage."

http://www.law.ucla.edu/williamsproj/publications/USReport.pdf

Note: Williams project has also published papers on the same topic for the States of California, Connecticut, Colorado, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Texas, and Washington (all .pdf format). Links to all can be found at:

http://www.law.ucla.edu/williamsproj/publications/Policy-Census-index.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "Same-Sex Couples and Same-Sex Couples Raising Children in The United States: Data from Census 2000" (without the quotes). The state reports are linked below the national report.

B. "Bi-National Same-Sex Unmarried Partners in Census 2000: A Demographic Portrait," by Gary J. Gates (October 2005, .pdf format, 19p.). "While current United States immigration policy is based primarily on family reunification, it does not provide any rights for unmarried partners of citizens. In order to inform current legislative debates about expanding the policy of family reunification to include same-sex couples, this report provides a demographic and geographic portrait of bi-national same-sex 'unmarried partners' from Census 2000.

http://www.law.ucla.edu/williamsproj/publications/Binational_Report.pdf

More information about UCLA Williams Project:

http://www.law.ucla.edu/williamsproj/about/index.html

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Sexuality Information and Education Council of the U.S. (SIECUS) Report: " SIECUS PEPFAR (President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief) Country Profiles: Focusing on Prevention and Youth," by Vanessa Brocato (2005, .pdf format, 177p.). More information about the report, as well as links to complete or country by country full text, is available at:

http://www.siecus.org/inter/PEPFAR/

More information about SIECUS:

http://www.siecus.org/about/index.html

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University of Chicago Monograph: _The Total Survey Error Approach: A Guide to the New Science of Survey Research_" by Herbert F. Weisberg (2005, 336p. ISBN 0-226-89127-5 (Cloth), 0-226-89128-3 (Paper). For more information see:

http://www.press.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/hfs.cgi/00/161098.ctl

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Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info for Health Pop. Reporter (vol. 5, no. 46, Nov. 14, 2005). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

Note: January 2004 - present Pop. Reporter is available via CD-ROM. Contact Ghazaleh Samandari at gsamanda@jhuccp.org with your request and complete mailing address.

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WORKING PAPERS:

University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Demography and Ecology: " Breastfeeding and Postpartum Amenorrhea among Bolivian Women: A Survival Analysis," by Guido Pinto (WP- 2005-01, 2005, .pdf format, 73p.).

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cde/cdewp/2005-01.pdf

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California Center for Population Research:

A. "Education Delayed or Education Denied? Evidence on the Historically Variable Role of Delayed Educational Careers in Former Communist Countries," by Martin Kreidl (CCPR-047-05, November 2005, .pdf format, 69p.).

Abstract:

This paper explores why previous research failed to find any empirical evidence confirming the success of "Communist affirmative action" in reducing inequality in access to secondary and tertiary education in Bulgaria, the Czech republic, Hungary, Poland, and Slovakia between 1948- 1989. I argue that scholars have too narrowly focused on ultimate educational attainment of each cohort and have thus overlooked important life-course and historical dynamics of educational stratification in former socialist countries. In this paper I study detailed information on educational careers from the Social Stratification in Eastern Europe after 1989 survey, distinguish the stratification of early and delayed school transitions and compare the differential degree of stratification of early and delayed transitions across cohorts. I show that delayed school transitions were usually stratified less on socioeconomic background than delayed transitions, yet this life-course differential was by no means stable over time. It turns out that delayed school transitions were stratified more strongly in cohorts, in which early transitions were stratified less as a result of the "Communist Affirmative Action". These two offsetting tendencies were overlooked by previous research and combined to produce and overall stable effect of SES on school transitions. I conclude that delayed education careers worked against the success of the egalitarian policies and offered a highly selective second chance for socioeconomically advantaged and politically disadvantaged students. This finding is statistically robust and is identified even in models that control for unmeasured individual-level heterogeneity. I argue that scholars should pay more attention to detailed educational careers and should not only study highest degree completed as otherwise their results may be biased and/or incomplete.

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/ccpr_047_05.asp

Click on "Full Text" at the bottom of the abstract for link to full text.

B. "Neighborhood Norms and Substance Use Among Teens," by Kelly Musick, Judith A. Seltzer, and Christine R. Schwartz (CCPR-048-05, November 2005, .pdf format, 43p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses new data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A. FANS) to examine how norms shape teenagers' substance use. Specifically, it uses multilevel models to describe the effects of adult neighbors' smoking, drinking, and marijuana use and their beliefs about these behaviors, which we treat as norms, on teenagers' substance use, taking account of parents' attitudes and behavior and other family-level characteristics. We investigate how the association between neighborhood attitudes and teen behavior depends on: (1) consensus in neighbors' substance use and disapproval of substance use; (2) the willingness and ability of neighbors to enforce norms, for instance, by monitoring teens' activities; and (3) the degree to which teens are exposed to their neighbors. We find little effect of neighborhood norms on teen substance use, regardless of how we condition the effects. We discuss possible explanations and implications in our concluding section.

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/ccpr_048_05.asp

Click on "Full Text" at the bottom of the abstract for link to full text.

C. "The Migration Industry in the Mexico-U.S. Migratory System," by Ruben Hernandez-Leon (CCPR-049-05, November 2005, .pdf format).

Abstract:

This article proposes the concept of the migration industry as the ensemble of entrepreneurs, businesses and services which, motivated by the pursuit of financial gain, facilitate and sustain international migration. Although long present and woven into the human mobility literature, the migration industry has remained largely under theorized, excluded from any major research efforts and reduced to its illegal and informal dimensions. This article offers a comprehensive conceptualization of the migration industry, including legal, illegal, formal and informal activities, and their interaction and articulation with relevant actors and structures of the social process of international migration, namely, states, migrants and their networks, and advocacy organizations. As a distinct component of the social process of international migration, the content, dynamics and bounds of the migration industry depend on state immigration policies, the size, composition and geography of population flows and the modes of incorporation of immigrants. The concept is applied to the study of the Mexico-U.S. migratory system and to the rise and consolidation of new destinations of Mexican immigration in the United States.

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/ccpr_049_05.asp

Click on "Full Text" at the bottom of the abstract for link to full text.

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Rand Corporation Labor and Population Program: Rand's LPP has recently released the following working papers. Links to extensive abstracts and full text (.pdf format) can be found below:

A. "Today or Last Year? How Do Interviewees Answer the CPS Health Insurance Questions?" by Jeanne S. Ringel and Jacob Alex Klerman (WR288, 2005, 20p.).

http://www.rand.org/publications/WR/WR288/

B. "Measurement Error and Misclassification: A Comparison of Survey and Register Data," by Arie Kapteyn and Jelmer Yeb Ypma (WR283, 2005, 30p.).

http://www.rand.org/publications/WR/WR283/

C. "Work Disability is a Pain in the *****, Especially in England, The Netherlands, and the United States," by James Banks, Arie Kapteyn, James P. Smith and Arthur van Soest (WR280, 2005, 41p.).

http://www.rand.org/publications/WR/WR280/

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Population Council Research Division: Population Council Research Division: "The changing context of sexual initiation in sub-Saharan Africa," by Barbara S. Mensch, Monica J. Grant, and Ann K. Blanc (Working Paper No. 206, 2005, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

During the past 20 years, substantial reductions have occurred in the proportion of young women who report marrying as teenagers in sub-Saharan Africa. An oft-stated consequence of a delay in age at marriage is a rise in the proportion of young women who engage in premarital sex. This paper investigates the links between changing age at marriage and premarital sexual behavior in 27 sub-Saharan African countries in which Demographic and Health Surveys were conducted between 1994 and 2003. Using multiple-decrement life tables to examine the competing risks of premarital sex and marriage without prior sexual experience, we answer the largely unaddressed question of how reductions in the prevalence of early marriage have affected the likelihood of initiating premarital sex. Our analysis reveals that although the age of first sexual activity has either remained the same or increased, a shift in the context of sexual debut from marriage to before marriage has taken place in many countries. We assess whether the increase in the proportion of young women who report premarital sex is influenced by an increase in exposure resulting from delayed marriage or by an increase in the rate of premarital sex. The evidence on this point is mixed; in some settings greater exposure " explains" more of the increase, whereas in others an increased rate of premarital sex dominates.

http://www.popcouncil.org/publications/wp/prd/206.html

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Economic Growth Center (Yale University): "Fertility and Income," by T. Paul Schultz (Discussion Paper No. 925, October 2005, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

There is an inverse association between income per adult and fertility among countries, and across households this inverse association is also often observed. Many studies find fertility is lower among better educated women and is often higher among women whose families own more land and assets. What do we know about the social consequences of events and policies that change fertility, if they are independent of parent preferences for children or the economic conditions which account for much of the variation in parent lifetime fertility? These effects of exogenous fertility change on the health and welfare of children can are assessed from Kenyan household survey data by analysis of the consequences of twins, and the effect of avoiding unanticipated fertility appears to have a larger beneficial effect on the body mass index or health status of children in the family than would be expected due to variation in fertility which is accounted for by parent education and household land.

http://www.econ.yale.edu/growth_pdf/cdp925.pdf

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United Nations Development Programme, International Poverty Centre: " Conditional Cash Transfers in African Countries," by Nanak Kakwani, Fabio Veras Soares, and Hyun H. Son (Working Paper No. 9, November 2005, .pdf format, 90p.).

Abstract:

Poverty affects a large proportion of the population in Sub-Saharan Africa and, far from decreasing, the proportion and numbers of poor people in Sub-Saharan Africa have actually increased over the last ten years. Policies to reduce poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and elsewhere are defying conventional wisdom. Single-focus solutions have proved ineffective. There is an urgent need to learn from both successful and failed experiences that have been tried elsewhere. This study provides an ex-ante assessment of the implementation of a cash transfer programme conditional on school attendance in 15 Sub-Saharan African countries. Conditional cash transfer (CCT) programmes have been tried in other regions, notably Latin America, with relative success. The two key characteristics of CCT programmes are that they simultaneously act upon the short and long term dimensions of poverty. Therefore we investigate here both the impact of a cash transfer on current poverty and the impact of conditioning the transfer upon school attendance.

http://www.undp-povertycentre.org/newsletters/WorkingPaper9.pdf

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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "The Gender Gap Reloaded: Is School Quality Linked to Labor Market Performance?," by Spyros Konstantopoulos and Amelie Constant (Discussion Paper No. 1830, November 2005, .pdf format, 41p.).

Abstract:

This study examines the gender gap in wages of young adults in the late 1970s, mid 1980s, and 2000, in the middle and the tails of the wage distribution using quantile regression. We also examine the importance of school quality indicators in predicting future labor market performance. We conduct analyses for three major racial groups in the US: Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics. We employ base year and follow up data from two rich longitudinal studies: the National Longitudinal Study (NLS) of high school seniors in 1972 and the National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS) of eighth graders in 1988. Our results indicate that school quality is an important predictor of and positively associated to future wages for Whites, but it is less so for the two minority groups. We confirm significant gender disparities in wages favoring men across three surveys in the 1970s, 1980s, and 2000 that are unaccounted for. While the unexplained gender gap is evident across the entire wage distribution, it is more pronounced for Whites and less pronounced for Blacks and Hispanics. Overall, the gender gap in wages is more pronounced in higher paid jobs (top 10 percent) for all groups, indicating the presence of a n alarming 'glass ceiling'.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1830.pdf

B. "The Impact of Parental Income and Education on the Health of their Children," by Orla Doyle, Colm Harmon, and Ian Walker (Discussion Paper No. 1832, November 2005, .pdf format, 25p.).

Abstract:

This paper investigates the robustness of recent findings on the effect of parental background on child health. We are particularly concerned with the extent to which their finding that income effects on child health are the result of spurious correlation rather than some causal mechanism. A similar argument can be made for the effect of education - if parental education and child health are correlated with some common unobservable (say, low parental time preference) then least squares estimates of the effect of parental education will be biased upwards. Moreover, it is very common for parental income data to be grouped, in which case income is measured with error and the coefficient on income will be biased towards zero and there are good reasons why the extent of bias may vary with child age. Fixed effect estimation is undermined by measurement error and here we adopt the traditional solution to both spurious correlation and measurement error and use an instrumental variables approach. Our results suggest that the income effects observed in the data are spurious.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1832.pdf

C. "Male and Female Competitive Behavior: Experimental Evidence," by Nabanita Datta Gupta, Anders Poulsen, and Marie-Claire Villeval (Discussion Paper No. 1833, November 2005, .pdf format, 35p.).

Abstract:

Male and female choices differ in many economic situations, e.g., on the labor market. This paper considers whether such differences are driven by different attitudes towards competition. In our experiment subjects choose between a tournament and a piece-rate pay scheme before performing a real task. Men choose the tournament significantly more often than women. Women are mainly influenced by their degree of risk aversion, but men are not. Men compete more against men than against women, but compete against women who are thought to compete. The behavior of men seems primarily to be influenced by social norms whose nature and origin we discuss.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1833.pdf

D. "Immigration and Public Spending," by Rene Boheim and Karin Mayr (Discussion Paper No. 1834, November 2005, .pdf format, 24p.).

Abstract:

We examine the relation between low-skilled and high-skilled immigration and public spending from a theoretical and an empirical perspective. We introduce the distinction of public spending on private goods and on public goods. Our model implies that high-skilled immigration can have a negative effect on public spending only in the presence of an antisocial effect. We test our theoretical hypotheses, the "income effect" and the " anti-social effect" of immigration, and a "welfare magnet effect" of public spending empirically using OECD panel data for 1990-2001. Estimating a system of simultaneous equations using three stage least squares (3SLS), we find evidence for an anti-social effect for low-skilled and high-skilled immigrants. In addition, we also find empirical evidence for the welfare magnet effect.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1834.pdf

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Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population (McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario Canada): "Measurement Errors in Recall Food Expenditure Data," by Naeem Ahmed, Matthew Brzozowski, and Thomas F. Crossley (SEDAP Research Paper No. 133, October 2005, .pdf format, 42p.).

Abstract:

Household expenditure data is an important input into the study of consumption and savings behaviour and of living standards and inequality. Because it is collected in many surveys, food expenditure data has formed the basis of much work in these areas. Recently, there has been considerable interest in properties of different ways of collecting expenditure information. It has also been suggested that measurement error in expenditure data seriously affects empirical work based on such data. The Canadian Food Expenditure Survey asks respondents to first estimate their household's food expenditures and then record food expenditures in a diary for two weeks. This unique experiment allows us to compare recall and diary based expenditure data collected from the same individuals. Under the assumption that the diary measures are "true" food consumption, this allows us to observe errors in measures of recall food consumption directly, and to study the properties of those errors. Under this assumption, measurement errors in recall food consumption data appear to be substantial, and they do not have many of the properties of classical measurement error. In particular, they are neither uncorrelated with true consumption nor conditionally homoscedastic. In addition, they are not well approximated by either a normal or log normal distribution. We also show evidence that diary measures are themselves imperfect, suffering for example, from "diary exhaustion". This suggests alternative interpretations for the differences between recall and diary consumption measures. Finally, we compare estimates of income and household size elasticities of per capita food consumption based on the two kinds of expenditure data and, in contrast to some previous work, find little difference between the two.

http://socserv.socsci.mcmaster.ca/sedap/p/sedap133.pdf

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

Other Journals:

AIDS (Vol. 19, No. 18, December 2, 2005).

http://www.aidsonline.com/pt/re/aids/issuelist.htm

American Journal of Sociology (Vol. 111, No. 2, September 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJS/journal/contents/v111n2.html

European Journal of Public Health (Vol. 15, Supplement No. 1, October 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

http://eurpub.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol15/issue5/index.dtl

Health Policy and Planning (Vol. 20, No. 6, November 2005).

http://heapol.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol20/issue6/index.dtl

International Journal for Quality in Health Care (Vol. 17, No. 6, December 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://intqhc.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol17/issue6/index.dtl

Sociological Theory (Vol. 23, No. 4, December 2005).

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/toc/soth/23/4

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CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS:

Population Association of America: The 2006 Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America will be held March 30-April 1, 2006 at the Westin Bonaventure in Los Angeles, California.

For more information:

http://www.popassoc.org/meetings.html

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

Luxembourg Income Study: "Microdata Expert": For more information (.pdf format, 1p.) see:

http://www.lisproject.org/whatsnew/microdataexpert.pdf

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DATA:

Panel Study for Income Dynamics: (NOTE: CHECK THESE BEFORE SENDING)

A. "2002 Child Assessments," (Oct. 31, 2005). CDS-II File Release 3: Child Assessments Release 3 contains corrections to the BMI calculation for 10 teens who were pregnant at the time of the CDS-II interview.

http://psidonline.isr.umich.edu/Guide/DataNewsDet.aspx?ID=343

B. "2002 Child File," (Oct. 31, 2005). CDS-II File Release 3: CDS-II Child Release 3 CDS-II Child interview includes calculated scale for the adolescent depression measure.

http://psidonline.isr.umich.edu/Guide/DataNewsDet.aspx?ID=344

C. "2002 Demographic File - including weights," (Oct. 31, 2005). CDS-II File Release 3:Demographic File Release 3 contains new module-response variables for time diaries and Common Core of Data files.

http://psidonline.isr.umich.edu/Guide/DataNewsDet.aspx?ID=345

D. "2002 Selected Variables from NCES CCD," (Oct. 31, 2005). CDS-II File Release 2: Selected Variables from NCES CCD Release 2 of the CDS selected variables from the NCES CCD reflects updated data from the NCES summer 2005 release, which they consider to be their "final release". The second change is the coding for the INAP data points, they are now left in their original NCES code so that true zero values can be distinguished from an INAP value.

http://psidonline.isr.umich.edu/Guide/DataNewsDet.aspx?ID=346

Data access:

http://psidonline.isr.umich.edu/Data/

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Medical Expenditure Panel Study: "New Compendium tables from the 2003 MEPS Household Prescribed Drug Estimates: Top 10 Drugs," (Department of Health and Human Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, November 2005).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/CompendiumTables/TC_TOC.HTM

Click on "2003" under "Prescribed Drug Estimates: Top 10 Drugs

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Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Youth-Parent Socialization Panel Study, 1965-1997: Four Waves Combined (#4037)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04037.xml

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UK Data Archive (Essex University, Colchester, UK): The UK Data Archive has recently added the following dataset to its holdings. Note: There may be charges or licensing requirements on holdings of the UK Data Archive. For more information see:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/

SN 5249 -National Identity and Constitutional Change in England,Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, 2001 and 2003

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5249

SN 5258 -Annual Population Survey, April 2004 - March 2005: Public Use Data

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5258

SN 5257 -Annual Population Survey, April 2004 - March 2005: Special Licence Access

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5257

SN 5269 -Mental Health of Children and Young People in Great Britain, 2004

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5269

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WEBSITES OF INTEREST:

Kaiser Family Foundation: Medicaid Factsheets and Database: "The Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured presents the State Medicaid Fact Sheets and the Medicaid Benefits Online Database, two interactive tools featuring the latest key data,information and services provided for each state's Medicaid program. Both tools allow for easy access to the data which can then be printed, saved and emailed."

State Medicaid Factsheets:

http://cme.kff.org/Key=9644.gJ.C.C.PQtS3V

Medicaid Benefits Online Database:

http://www.kff.org/medicaid/benefits/index.jsp

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-- Jack Solock
Data Librarian--
Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu