Current Demographic Research Report #107, October 31, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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CDERR is compiled and edited by Jack Solock, Kristin Wick, and Charlie Fiss of the University of Wisconsin Center for Demography and Ecology Information Services Center.

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NOTE! Index Items marked with *** indicate there are related articles. Articles can be found with the item in the body of the report. We cannot guarantee the permanence of related article addresses. They may be available in Lexis-Nexis, ProQuest Newspapers. Check your organization's library.

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Index to this issue:

CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

U.S.

Census Bureau Report***, Facts for Features

Centers for Disease Control News Release: "Number of Americans with Diabetes Continues to Increase"***

National Center for Health Statistics Report: "Preliminary Births for 2004"***

_Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_ Article, Surveillance Summary

NIH News Releases

Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Statistics Reports

National Center for Education Statistics Reports

US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Reports

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United Nations Children's Fund: "Children the Missing Face of AIDS: A call to action"

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Eurostat Periodical, News Release

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Canada:

Statistics Canada Report: The socio-economic progress of the children of immigrants"***

Canadian Institute for Health Information/Institut canadien d'information sur la sante Report: "Improving the Health of Young Canadians"

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Japan:

Japan Statistics Bureau: "2004 Establishment and Enterprise Survey"

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Netherlands:

Statistics Netherlands: _Statistical Yearbook: 2005_

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Norway:

Statistics Norway Article: "Focus on: Immigration and immigrants"

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New Zealand:

New Zealand Health Information Service Reports

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Poland:

Central Statistical Office: "Statistical Bulletin No. 9 - October 2005"

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South Africa:

Statistics South Africa Compendium: _South African Statistics, 2004/2005_

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Inspector General Report: "Determining if Children Classified as SCHIP Medicaid Expansion Meet Eligibility Criteria"

Population Reference Bureau Reports

Alan Guttmacher Institute Research Brief: "Reducing Unintended Pregnancy in Nigeria"

Urban Institute Article, Report

Kaiser Family Foundation Reports

World Bank Monograph: _The Urban Poor in Latin America_

Center for Global Development Monograph: _Reality Check: The Distributional Impact of Privatization in Developing Countries_

_Nature_ Article Abstract: "A haplotype map of the human genome"***

_Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences_ Special Section: " Spatial Demography"

_British Medical Journal_--Various

_Lancet_ Series Summary, Comment

Info for Health Pop. Reporter

WORKING PAPERS

California Center for Population Research
Population Council Policy Research Division
National Bureau of Economic Research
University of Southern California Center in Law, Econ & Organization (CLEO)
Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER)
Center for Economic Studies/Ifo Institute for Economic Research (CESifo)
Crisis States Research Centre

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta Other Journals

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

National Institutes of Health

RAND Fellows in Population Studies and the Study of Aging

Government of Canada/Gouvernement du Canada Global Health Research Initiative Teasdale-Corti Team Grants

LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES

House Energy and Commerce Hearing Publication: "The Threat of and Planning for Pandemic Flu"

DATA

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research

UK Data Archive

National Center for Education Statistics: "NCES Handbooks Online"

Medical Expenditure Panel Survey

Department of Housing and Urban Development: "2001-2003 CINCH (Components of Inventory Change) and Rental Dynamics"

Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey: "Round 13 Data Availability"

Luxembourg Income Study: "Standardized Education Recoding Routines"

WEBSITES OF INTEREST

KaiserEdu.org Update

BIBLIOGRAPHY UPDATES

National Longitudinal Surveys

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

U.S.:

1. Census Bureau Report, Facts for Features, News Release:

A. "Computer and Internet Use in the United States: 2003," by Jennifer Cheeseman Day, Alex Janus, and Jessica Davis (Special Studies P23-208, October 2005, .pdf format, 14p., with detailed tables in Microsoft Excel and comma separated value [.csv] format). The report and tables are linked to from a Census Bureau news release: "Computer and Internet Use in the United States: 2003" (Oct. 27, 2005).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/miscellaneous/005863.html

Click on title for link to full text and tables.

Related article: "A Window on Ourselves -- Our 2003 Selves, Anyway," by Frank Ahrens (_Washington Post_, Oct. 30, 2005). Note: _WP_ requires free registration before providing articles. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/10/29/AR2005102900207.html

B. Census Bureau Facts for Features: "American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month: November 2005" (CB05-FF.16-2, Oct. 25, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 4p.).

HTML:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/005684.html

.pdf:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2005/cb05ff16-2.pdf

C. Census Bureau Facts for Features: "The Holiday Season" (CB05-FF.19, Oct. 27, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 5p.).

HTML:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/005870.html

.pdf:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2005/cb05ff-19.pdf

D. "Commerce Secretary Announces Formation of 2010 Census Advisory Group" (news release CB05-158, Oct. 27, 2005).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/census_2010/005908.html

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2. Centers for Disease Control News Release: "Number of Americans with Diabetes Continues to Increase" (October 26, 2005).

http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/fs051026.htm

Related article: "21 million Americans have diabetes, CDC finds" (Reuters, Oct.26, 2005). http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=healthNews&storyID=2005-10-26T211500Z_01_WRI676472_RTRIDST_0_HEALTH-DIABETES-DC.XML

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3. National Center for Health Statistics Report: "Preliminary Births for 2004," by Brady E. Hamilton, Stephanie J. Ventura, Joyce A. Martin, and Paul D. Sutton (October 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 5p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/pubs/pubd/hestats/prelim_births/prelim_births04.htm

Related article: "Births to unmarried women hit record," by Sharon Jayson (_USA Today_ [McLean, Virginia], Oct. 30, 2005). http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2005-10-28-unwed-moms_x.htm

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4. _Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_ Article, Surveillance Summary:

A. "Estimated Exposure of Adolescents to State-Funded Anti-Tobacco Television Advertisements --- 37 States and the District of Columbia, 1999--2003" (Centers for Disease Control, Vol. 54, No. 42, Oct. 28, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, p. 1077-1080).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5442a3.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5442.pdf

B. "Health-Related Quality of Life Surveillance --- United States, 1993--2002" (Centers for Disease Control, _MMWR_ Surveillance Summary Vol. 54, SS-4, Oct. 28, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 44p.).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5404a1.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/ss/ss5404.pdf

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5. NIH News Releases:

A. "Heart Attack Death Rates Found Higher for All Patients in Hospitals Treating Larger Share of African Americans" (National Institute on Aging, Oct. 24, 2005).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/oct2005/nia-24.htm

B. "Annual Bibliography of Significant Advances in Dietary Supplement Research 2004" (Oct. 24, 2005). The news release links to the bibliography (.pdf format, 20p.). Annual bibliographies on this topic are available back to 1999.

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/oct2005/od-24.htm

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6. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Statistics Reports:

A. "2004 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS): Data on Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities," (October 2005, questionnaire available in .pdf format, 13p.).

http://wwwdasis.samhsa.gov/04nssats/index.htm

Questionnaire:

http://wwwdasis.samhsa.gov/dasis2/nssats.htm

B. "Trends in Admissions for PCP: 1993-2003" (Drug and Alcohol Services Information System (DASIS), October 2005, HTML and.pdf format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k5/PCPtx/PCPtx.cfm

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7. National Center for Education Statistics Reports:

A. "Fourth-Grade Students Reading Aloud: NAEP 2002 Special Study of Oral Reading," by Mary C. Daane, Jay R. Campbell, Wendy S. Grigg, Madeline J. Goodman, and Andreas Oranje (NCES 2006469, October 2005, .pdf format, 70p.).

Abstract:

This report discusses findings about fourth-grade students' oral reading from a special study that was part of the 2002 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading assessment. The data were derived from a nationally representative subsample of students who participated in the 2002 main NAEP reading assessment. The results suggest that the three separate components of oral reading ability--accuracy, rate, and fluency--are very much related to each other and to reading comprehension, as measured by the main NAEP assessment. "Fluent" readers in this study were likely to read higher percentages of words accurately, to read the passage at a faster rate, and to have scored higher, on average, on the NAEP reading assessment than "nonfluent" readers. More than one-half of the students read the study passage fluently, with a fairly high degree of accuracy, and at a rate of at least 105 words per minute. However, a group of students whose average scale score and labored oral reading performance suggested they were struggling also demonstrated, on average, the lowest performance on measures of accuracy, rate, and fluency. Students' self-correction of their oral reading errors was found to be somewhat dependent upon whether or not those errors resulted in meaning change. Further, students who self-corrected greater proportions of all errors (meaning-change and non-meaning-change) also showed a higher average scale score. Results for student groups defined by gender and race/ethnicity reflected the outcomes for the entire subsample; i.e., student groups with higher average reading scores were more likely to demonstrate, on average, higher performance in measures of accuracy, rate, and fluency.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006469

B. "An Examination of the Conditions of School Facilities Attended by 10th-Grade Students in 2002," by Michael Planty and Jill Devoe (NCES 2006302, October 2005, .pdf format, 68p.).

Abstract:

This report presents key findings from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002) Facilities Checklist for all ELS:2002 public and private schools and students in the 10th grade. The first section presents findings at the school level. National estimates on the appearance, safety and security, noise levels, and neighborhood conditions for public and private 10th-grade schools in 2002 are provided. The second section presents a description of the number and percentage of 10th-grade students who attend schools with a particular condition. In this section, national estimates on the number of 10th-grade public and private school students that attend schools with certain characteristics based on structural appearance and safety and security are provided. Appendixes discuss the goals and objectives of the ELS:2002 study, the base year study design and methodology. Also, discussions of base year sampling, weighting, response rates, and standard errors follow. Additionally, an account is provided of the statistical procedures employed for this report. A glossary is presented and, finally, the facilities checklist instrument is duplicated.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006302

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8. US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Reports:

A. "Food Assistance Landscape, September 2005," by Victor Oliveira (Economic Information Bulletin No. EIB6-1, October 2005, .pdf format, 6p.).

Abstract:

USDA expenditures for its 15 food assistance programs totaled $25.9 billion during the first half of fiscal 2005 (October 2004-March 2005), an 11-percent increase over the first half of fiscal 2004. Five programs--the Food Stamp Program, the National School Lunch Program, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), the School Breakfast Program, and the Child and Adult Care Food Program--accounted for 95 percent of USDA's total expenditures for food assistance. Spending on each of these five programs grew during the first half of fiscal 2005 relative to the first half of fiscal year 2004, but most of the increase was due to the Food Stamp Program. This report uses preliminary data from the Food and Nutrition Service to examine trends in the programs at the midpoint of fiscal 2005. It also discusses a recent ERS report that presents findings from an evaluation of projects aimed at testing ways to increase Food Stamp Program participation among eligible elderly individuals.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/eib6-1/

B. "Food Security in the United States Briefing Room." ERS maintains this page, with links to the latest information and trends, as well as to relevant ERS reports and data on the topic.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/FoodSecurity/

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United Nations Children's Fund: "Children the Missing Face of AIDS: A call to action" (October 2005, .pdf format, 25p.).

Abstract:

AIDS is threatening children as never before. Millions of them are missing their childhood, medicines, education, information and a host of other essentials due to the disease. Yet they are often overlooked in AIDS programmes, policies and budgets. The Unite for Children. Unite against AIDS Campaign, a global effort by UNICEF, UNAIDS and a multiplicity of other partners, aims to accelerate action to help those at risk of HIV infection, and those already infected and affected by HIV/AIDS. Through four focus areas - prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, providing paediatric treatment, preventing infection among adolescents and young people, and protecting and supporting children affected by AIDS, the Campaign aims to ensure that this is the last generation of children that bears the burden of AIDS.

http://www.unicef.org/publications/index_29157.html

Click on "PDF" for full text.

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Eurostat Periodical, News Release:

A. _Sigma: The bulletin of European Statistics_ (No. 1, 2005, .pdf format). _Sigma_ is a magazine published twice a year by Eurostat, addressing those who are interested in European statistics. Each issue deals with a specific statistical topic and illustrates the views of both the producers and the users. In this issue, which focuses on health statistics, you will find contributions from Eurostat, the national statistical offices, the Directorates General Health and Consumer Protection and Personnel and Administration, the OCDE, the OMS as well as the Institute for Health Protection and the Spanish Ministry of Health.

http://epp.eurostat.cec.eu.int/portal/page?_pageid=1073,46587259&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL&p_product_code=KS-BU-05-001

B. "European demography: EU25 population up by 0.5% in 2004: Nearly one third of births in the EU25 outside marriage" (136/2005, Oct. 25, 2005, .pdf format, 5p.).

http://epp.eurostat.cec.eu.int/pls/portal/docs/PAGE/PGP_PRD_CAT_PREREL/PGE_CAT_PREREL_YEAR_2005/PGE_CAT_PREREL_YEAR_2005_MONTH_10/3-25102005-EN-AP.PDF

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Canada:

1. Statistics Canada Report: The socio-economic progress of the children of immigrants," by Abdurrahman Aydemir, Wen-Hao Chen and Miles Corak (Analytical Studies Branch research paper series No. 267, October 2005, .pdf format, 44p.). The report is linked to from a Stats Canada news release, "Study: The socio-economic progress of the children of immigrants" (Oct. 25, 2005).

http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/051025/d051025b.htm

Click on "11F0019MIE2005267" at the bottom of the news release, then click on "view."

Related article: "Canada to open doors to up to 300,000 new immigrants a year" (Associated Press via _Santa Fe New Mexican_, Oct. 31, 2005). http://www.freenewmexican.com/news/34417.html

2. Canadian Institute for Health Information/Institut canadien d'information sur la sante Report: "Improving the Health of Young Canadians" (October 2005, .pdf format, 107p.)."A new CIHI report examines the health of Canadian youth 12 to 19 years old. Adolescence is a time of changing social roles, relationships, experiences and expectations. Teens' experiences can influence their health later in life. Improving the Health of Young Canadians examines links between adolescents' social environments and their health. In this report, the Canadian Population Health Initiative--a part of the Canadian Institute for Health Information--explores the role families, schools, peers and communities play in helping adolescents make a healthy and positive transition to adulthood." Note: CIHI/ICIS requires free registration before providing reports.

http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/dispPage.jsp?cw_page=cphi_e

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Japan:

Japan Statistics Bureau: "2004 Establishment and Enterprise Survey" (October 2005, Microsoft Excel format, with industrial classifications in HTML format).

http://www.stat.go.jp/english/data/jigyou/index.htm

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Netherlands:

Statistics Netherlands: _Statistical Yearbook: 2005_ (August 2005, .pdf format, 226p.).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/publicaties/boeken/algemeen/statistisch-jaarboek/statistical-yearbook-2005.htm

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New Zealand:

New Zealand Health Information Service Reports:

A. "Fetal and Infant Deaths 2001" (October 2005, .pdf format, 72p., with Microsoft Excel tables).

http://www.nzhis.govt.nz/publications/Fetal.html

B. "Mortality and Demographic Data 2001" (October 2005, .pdf format, 140p., with Microsoft Excel tables).

http://www.nzhis.govt.nz/publications/Mortality.html

C. "Mental Health: Service Use in New Zealand 2002" (October 2005, .pdf format, 98p., with Microsoft Excel tables).

http://www.nzhis.govt.nz/publications/Mental.html

D. "Selected Morbidity Data for Publicly Funded Hospitals 2001/02" (October 2005, .pdf format, 258p., with Microsoft Excel tables).

http://www.nzhis.govt.nz/publications/Public.html

E. "Selected Morbidity Data for Privately Funded Hospitals 2001" (October 2005, .pdf format, 98p., with Microsoft Excel tables).

http://www.nzhis.govt.nz/publications/privatemorbidity.html

F. "Cancer: New Registrations and Deaths 2001" (October 2005, .pdf format, 140p., with Microsoft Excel tables).

http://www.nzhis.govt.nz/publications/Cancer.html

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Norway:

Statistics Norway Article: "Focus on: Immigration and immigrants" (Oct. 27, 2005). The article contains links to several SN publication relevant to the topic.

http://www.ssb.no/innvandring_en/

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Poland:

Central Statistical Office: "Statistical Bulletin No. 9 - October 2005" (October 2005, Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.stat.gov.pl/english/opracowania_zbiorcze/b-s/2005/09_05/index.htm

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South Africa:

Statistics South Africa Compendium: _South African Statistics, 2004/2005_ (2005, .pdf format, 305p.).

http://www.statssa.gov.za/Publications/SAStatistics/SAStatistics2004.pdf

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Inspector General Report: "Determining if Children Classified as SCHIP Medicaid Expansion Meet Eligibility Criteria" (OEI-07-03-00221, October 2005. .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

Based on a random sample of children enrolled in Medicaid expansion, OIG found approximately 7 percent of sampled children did not meet States' eligibility guidelines, suggesting that States could seek an improper Federal match rate. For 10 percent of sampled children, States could not locate the case files, or eligibility determinations could not be supported because case files lacked documentation of a timely redetermination, as required by Federal regulation. Case files for 24 percent of sampled children contained income calculations that exhibited vulnerabilities because caseworker calculations varied from State guidelines in their eligibility determinations, were missing, or could not be duplicated. Although these vulnerabilities did not result in incorrect eligibility determinations, such vulnerabilities could potentially lead to errors in future determinations. Finally, a few States had difficulty identifying their Medicaid-expansion populations, raising concerns about whether States claim the appropriate Federal match rate for some children. OIG recommended that CMS work with States to (1) improve caseworker performance, (2) ensure that automated eligibility systems accurately classify children, and (3) ensure that State Medicaid programs conduct re-determinations as required; remind States of the requirement to properly maintain case-file documentation; and ensure that all States can accurately identify children determined eligible for Medicaid expansion. CMS concurred with OIG recommendations.

http://www.oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-07-03-00221.pdf

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Population Reference Bureau Reports:

A. "Beyond New Orleans: The Social and Economic Isolation of Urban African Americans," by Rogelio Saenz (October 2005).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/05_Articles/The_Social_and_Economic_Isolation_of_Urban_African_Americans.htm

B. "Obesity-Related Diseases Creep Up on Developing Countries," by Rachel Nugent (October 2005).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/05_Articles/Obesity_Creeping_Up_on_Less_Developed_Countries.htm

C. "Regional Differences in Age Patterns of Unsafe Abortion Suggest Need for Tailored Interventions," by Deborah Mesce (October 2005).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/05_Articles/Regional_Differences_in_Age_Patterns_of_Unsafe_Abortion_Suggest_Need_for_Tailored_Interventions.htm

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Alan Guttmacher Institute Research Brief: "Reducing Unintended Pregnancy in Nigeria," (_Research in Brief_, 2005 series, No. 4, .pdf format, 8p.).

http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/rib/2005/10/04/rib4-05.pdf

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Urban Institute Article, Reports:

A. "Income Taxes and Income Inequality Since 1979," by Troy Kravitz (Tax Analysts Tax Notes, October 24, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, p, 525).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=1000849

B. "Texas Prisoners' Reflections Returning Home," by Nancy G. La Vigne and Vera Kachnowski (October 2005, .pdf format, 12p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311247

C, "Who Are Low-Income Working Families?" by Gregory Acs and Pamela J. Loprest (September 2005, .pdf format, 19p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311242

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Kaiser Family Foundation Reports:

A. "Survey of Teens in the Greater Washington, D.C. Area" (Kaiser Family Foundation/ Harvard School of Public Health/_Washington Post_, October 2005, toplines, .pdf format, 24p.).

http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/7406.cfm

B. "A Comparison of the Ten Approved Katrina Waivers" (Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, October 2005, .pdf format, 3p.).

http://www.kff.org/medicaid/7420.cfm

C. "A National Survey of the Russian Public On HIV/AIDS," by Matt James (October 2005, .pdf format, 18p.). The report is linked to from a Kaiser news release: "Survey Shows Russians Want Greater Media Attention and Education on HIV/AIDS: Russian Media Companies Build on Efforts to Combat HIV/AIDS in 2006" (Oct. 27, 2005).

http://www.kff.org/entpartnerships/russia/phip102705nr.cfm

Click on "Survey Findings" on the right side of the page for link to full text.

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World Bank Monograph: _The Urban Poor in Latin America_, edited by Marianne Fay (2005,.pdf format, 280p.).

http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTURBANDEVELOPMENT/Resources/UrbanPoorText.pdf

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Center for Global Development Monograph: _Reality Check: The Distributional Impact of Privatization in Developing Countries_, edited by John Nellis and Nancy Birdsall (2005, .pdf format, 426p.). "The privatization of state-owned enterprises has been among the most controversial of market reforms. This new edited volume brings together a comprehensive set of country studies on the effects of privatization on people-and answers the overarching question: who are the winners and losers of the wave of privatizations that swept across the developing world in the 1980s and 1990s?"

http://www.cgdev.org/content/publications/detail/4520

Links to full text are available at the bottom of the page.

More information about CGD:

http://www.cgdev.org/section/about/

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_Nature_ Article Abstract: "A haplotype map of the human genome," by The International HapMap Consortium (Vol. 437, No. 7063, Oct. 27, 2005, p. 1299-1320).

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v437/n7063/abs/nature04226.html

Related articles:

A. "International Consortium Completes Map of Human Genetic Variation" (National Institutes of Health, National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) news release, Oct. 26, 2005). http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/oct2005/nhgri-26.htm

B. "Genetic Catalog May Aid Search for Roots of Disease," by Nicholas Wade (_New York Times_, Oct. 27, 2005). Note: _NYT_ requires free registration before providing articles. http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/27/science/27genome.html

C. "Scientists complete map of human genetic variation," by Patricia Reaney (Reuters, Oct. 26, 2005). http://today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=healthNews&storyID=2005-10-26T170230Z_01_MCC661279_RTRUKOC_0_US-SCIENCE-HAPMAP.xml&archived=False

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_Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences_ Special Section: " Spatial Demography" The latest issue of _PNAS_ (Vol. 102, No. 43, Oct. 25, 2005) contains a special section on "Spatial Demography," with six articles on the topic. Abstracts are freely available to the public.

http://www.pnas.org/content/vol102/issue43/#SOCIAL_SCIENCES

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_British Medical Journal_ Editorial Extract, News Extract, News Roundup Extract, News Extra Extract:

A. "Bird flu and pandemic flu," by John T. Macfarlane and Wei Shen Lim (editorial, Vol. 331, No. 7523, Oct. 29, 2005, p. 975-976).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/331/7523/975

B. "Bird flu poses no immediate threat to Europe, leading virologist claims," by Tony Sheldon (news, Vol. 331, No. 7523, Oct. 29, 2005, p. 981).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/331/7523/981-a

C. "Doctors who write guidelines often have ties to the drug industry," by Janice Hopkins Tanne (news, Vol. 331, No. 7523, Oct. 29, 2005, p. 982).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/331/7523/982-a

D. "Australian state and federal governments are attacked on mental health care," by Melissa Sweet (news roundup, Vol. 331, No. 7523, Oct. 29, 2005, p. 984).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/331/7523/984-d

E. "Experts disagree over who should get avian influenza vaccine," by Michael Day (news extra, Vol. 331, No. 7523, Oct. 29, 2005, p. 986).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/331/7523/986-a

F. _Life in Britain: Using Millennial Census Data to Understand Poverty, Inequality and Place_, by Ben Wheeler, Mary Shaw, Richard Mitchell, Danny Dorling, reviewed by Helen Roberts (book review, Vol. 331, No. 7523, Oct. 29, 2005, p. 1028).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/331/7523/1028

G. "How US healthcare cuts could kill me," by Lori Smith (personal views, Vol. 331, No. 7523, Oct. 29, 2005, p. 1030).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/331/7523/1030

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_Lancet_ Series Summary, Comment: Note: _Lancet_ requires free registration before providing content.

A. "Preventing chronic diseases: how many lives can we save?" by Kathleen Strong, Colin Mathers, Stephen Leeder and Robert Beaglehole (Vol. 366, No. 9496, Oct. 29, 2005, p. 1578-1582).

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140673605673412/abstract

B. "The neglected epidemic of chronic disease," by Richard Horton (Vol. 366, No. 9496, Oct. 29, 2005, p. 1514).

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140673605674545/fulltext

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Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info for Health Pop. Reporter (vol. 5, no. 44, Oct. 31, 2005). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

Note: January 2004 - present Pop. Reporter is available via CD-ROM. Contact Ghazaleh Samandari at gsamanda@jhuccp.org with your request and complete mailing address.

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WORKING PAPERS:

California Center for Population Research:

A. "The Influence of Relationship Context on Relationship-Specific Contraceptive Behavior Among Youth," by Yasamin Kusunoki and Dawn Upchurch (CCPR-037-05, October 2005, .pdf format, 53p.).

Abstract:

Contraceptive behavior by an individual varies both across and within relationships, and the nature and characteristics of relationships can influence use and the type of method used. This study utilizes the retrospective sexual relationship histories of young adults available in the most recent wave (2001-2002) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) to explore relationship-specific contraceptive method choice. Hierarchical generalized linear modeling is used to estimate the effects of both relationship-level and individual-level characteristics on the type of contraceptive method used at last sex. Four mutually exclusive categories for method use were constructed: condom only, hormonal method only, dual method (condom plus hormonal method), and no method. A number of relationship characteristics are significantly associated with contraceptive use even when controlling for individual characteristics. Moreover, the effects of relationship characteristics differ depending on the type of method examined. Significant between-individual variation in the type of contraceptive method used remains. Not only are the characteristics of the individuals forming the relationships of importance in determining contraceptive practices, but so too are the unique features of the relationship itself. Further investigation of other aspects of the relational context is warranted.

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/ccpr_037_05.asp

Click on "Full Text" at the bottom of the page for link to full text.

B. "Parents' Expectations about Child rearing after Divorce: Does Anticipating Difficulty Deter Divorce?," by Anne-Rigt Poortman and Judith A. Seltzer (CCPR-038-05, October 2005, .pdf format, 36p.).

Abstract:

Divorce is costly for parents because of the challenges of meeting children's economic and socio-emotional needs after separation. Using the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 1,935), we investigate whether expected economic and parenting costs deter divorce. Mothers expect higher economic costs than fathers, whereas fathers expect more parenting difficulties. The majority of mothers and fathers, however, expect high economic and parenting costs. In a large minority of families mothers and fathers differ in their expected costs. Furthermore, only parenting costs deter divorce, not economic costs, and mothers' parenting concerns are a greater barrier to divorce than fathers' concerns when parents disagree. Finally, expected parenting costs are more of a barrier to divorce for unhappy than happy couples.

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/ccpr_038_05.asp

Click on "Full Text" at the bottom of the page for link to full text.

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Population Council Policy Research Division: "The causes of stalling fertility transitions," by John Bongaarts (Working Paper No. 204, 2005, .pdf format, 32p.).

Abstract:

An examination of fertility trends in countries with multiple DHS surveys found that in the 1990s fertility stalled in mid-transition in seven countries: Bangladesh, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kenya, Peru, and Turkey. In each of these countries fertility was high (>6 births per woman) in the 1950s and then declined to fewer than 5 births per woman in the early or mid-1990s, before stalling. The level of stalling varied from 4.7 births per woman in Kenya to 2.5 births per woman in Turkey. An analysis of trends in the determinants of fertility revealed a systematic pattern of leveling off or near leveling in a number of determinants, including contraceptive use, the demand for contraception, and wanted fertility. The stalling countries did not experience significant increases in unwanted fertility or in the unmet need for contraception during the late 1990s, and program effort scores improved slightly except in the Dominican Republic. These findings suggest no major deterioration in contraceptive access during the stall, but levels of unmet need and unwanted fertility are relatively high and improvements in access to family planning methods would therefore be desirable. No significant link was found between the presence of a stall and trends in socioeconomic development, but at the onset of the stall the level of fertility was low relative to the level of development in all but one of the stalling countries.

http://www.popcouncil.org/publications/wp/prd/204.html

click on "PDF"

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National Bureau of Economic Research: Note: Individual NBER working papers are available for a small fee.

A. "Does Head Start Improve Children's Life Chances? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design," by Jens Ludwig and Douglas L. Miller (w11702, October 2005, .pdf format, 71p.).

Abstract:

This paper exploits a new source of variation in Head Start funding to identify the program's effects on health and schooling. In 1965 the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) provided technical assistance to the 300 poorest counties in the U.S. to develop Head Start funding proposals. The result was a large and lasting discontinuity in Head Start funding rates at the OEO cutoff for grant-writing assistance, but no discontinuity in other forms of federal social spending. We find evidence of a large negative discontinuity at the OEO cutoff in mortality rates for children ages 5-9 from causes that could be affected by Head Start, but not for other mortality causes or birth cohorts that should not be affected by the program. We also find suggestive evidence for a positive effect of Head Start on educational attainment in both the 1990 Census, concentrated among those cohorts born late enough to have been exposed to the program, and among respondents in the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11702

B. "Contraception as Development? New Evidence from Family Planning in Colombia," by Grant Miller (w11704, October 2005, .pdf format, 55p.).

Abstract:

There has been considerable debate in the last decade about whether or not family planning programs in developing countries reduce fertility or improve socio-economic outcomes. Despite suggestive associations, disagreement persists because the availability and use of modern contraceptives are generally determined by both supply- and demand-side factors. This paper provides new evidence on the role of contraceptive supply by exploiting the surprisingly haphazard expansion of one of the world's oldest and largest family planning organizations--PROFAMILIA of Colombia. Its findings suggest that family planning allowed Colombian women to postpone their first birth and have approximately one-half fewer children in their lifetime. Delayed first births, in turn, seem to have enabled young women to obtain more education and to work more and live independently later in life. Although family planning explains only about 10% of Colombia's fertility decline, it appears to have reduced the otherwise substantial costs of fertility control and may be among the most effective development interventions.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11704

C. "Income Risk and the Benefits of Social Insurance: Evidence from Indonesia and the United States," by Raj Chetty and Adam Looney (w11708, October 2005, .pdf format, 32p.).

Abstract:

This paper examines the welfare consequences of social safety nets in developing economies relative to developed economies. Using panel surveys of households in Indonesia and the United States, we find that food consumption falls by approximately ten percent when individuals become unemployed in both countries. This finding suggests that introducing a formal social insurance program would have small benefits in terms of reducing consumption fluctuations in Indonesia. However, in contrast with households in the U.S., Indonesians use costly methods such as reducing human capital investment to smooth consumption. The primary benefit of social insurance in developing countries may therefore come not from consumption smoothing itself but from reducing the use of inefficient smoothing methods.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11708

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University of Southern California Center in Law, Econ & Organization (CLEO): "Sex Differences in the Acceptability of Discrimination," by Timur Kuran and Edward J. McCaffery (USC CLEO Research Paper No. C05-7/USC Legal Studies Research Paper No. 05-17, July 2005, .pdf format, 26p.).

Abstract:

A two-mode survey, conducted by telephone and over the World-Wide Web shortly after the terrorist attacks of September 11, revealed that the willingness to tolerate discrimination varies significantly across domains, with a very high tolerance of discrimination against poorly educated immigrants and a strikingly low tolerance of discrimination against the genetically disadvantaged. Regardless of domain, tolerance for discrimination is greater among men than among women. But the size of this sex gap depends on survey mode. It is substantially larger on the Web than on the phone, suggesting that the social desirability bias, known to intensify with loss of anonymity, affects male and female attitudes in opposite ways. Whereas men become less accepting of discrimination when interviewed by a live person, women become more so, indicating that they disguise their concerns for equality.

http://lawweb.usc.edu/cleo/working-papers/cleo/documents/C05_7_paper.pdf

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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research [Rostock, Germany]: "The emergence of cohabitation as a first union and its later stability: the case of Hungarian women," by Margarete C. Kulik (WP 2005-031, October 2005, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

With the transition of the 1990s in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe, the demographic behavior of their populations has changed drastically. This paper focuses on Hungary where some of these developments like falling marriage rates were evident even before 1990. We examine the emergence of cohabitation as a first union and the stability of such relationships. Are they rather transformed into marriage or do they end in dissolution? How long do Hungarian woman stay in these unions? In addition to some descriptive statistics we apply event history analysis because this allows us to study the impact of individual-level characteristics on such choices. The data used is the Hungarian Generations and Gender Survey collected around November 2001. The analysis shows that there are marked differences in behavior between periods and that factors like pregnancy or employment do influence the decision for cohabitation as well as its further development.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2005-031.pdf

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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "Stressed Out on Four Continents: Time Crunch or Yuppie Kvetch?," by Daniel S. Hamermesh and Jungmin Lee (Discussion Paper No. 1815, October 2005, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

Social commentators have pointed to problems of workers who face "time stress"--an absence of sufficient time to accomplish all their tasks. An economic theory views time stress as reflecting how tightly the time constraint binds households. Time stress will be more prevalent in households with higher full earnings and whose members work longer in the market or on "required" homework. Evidence from Australia (2001), Germany (2002), the United States (2003) and Korea (1999) corroborates the theory. Adults in households with higher earnings perceive more time stress for the same amount of time spent in market work and household work. The importance of higher full earnings in generating time stress is not small, particularly in U.S.--much is "yuppie kvetch."

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1815.pdf

B. "Age Structure of the Workforce and Firm Performance," by Christian Grund and Niels Westergard-Nielsen (Discussion Paper No. 1816, October 2005, .pdf format, 17p.).

Abstract:

In this contribution, we examine the interrelation between corporate age structures and firm performance. In particular, we address the issues, whether firms with young rather than older employees are successful and whether firms with homogeneous or heterogeneous workforces are doing well. Several theoretical approaches are discussed with respect to these questions and divergent hypotheses are derived. Using Danish linked employer-employee data, we find that both mean age and dispersion of age in firms are inversely u-shaped related to firm performance.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1816.pdf

C. "Young Women's Religious Affiliation and Participation as Determinants of High School Completion," BY Evelyn L. Lehrer (Discussion Paper No. 1818, October 2005, .pdf format, 34p.).

Abstract:

The far-reaching consequences of failing to complete secondary schooling are well known. The central questions addressed in this study are: Does religion make a difference in the likelihood of successfully completing the transition to high-school graduation? If so, how large are the influences? Based on a human capital framework, the paper develops hypotheses about the effects of two dimensions of religion during childhood--affiliation and participation--and tests them with data on non-Hispanic white, African-American, and Hispanic female respondents from the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth. The results are generally consistent with the hypotheses, revealing sizeable differentials in high-school graduation rates by affiliation and participation. The results also uncover pronounced differences by race/ ethnicity.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1818.pdf

D. "Household Migration Decisions as Survival Strategy: The Case of Burkina Faso," by Adama Konseiga (Discussion Paper No. 1819, October 2005, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

The paper examines the motivations behind the important migration from Burkina Faso to Cote d'Ivoire, the economic pole in the West African Economic and Monetary Union. The paper uses a detailed household survey dataset on migration, natural resource management, risk management and solidarity collected in 2000 and 2002 in Northeastern Burkina Faso. In addition to the household survey, two other village and institutional level surveys were conducted. The methodology emphasizes the linkage between economic theories and empirical evidence, using econometric tools that are robust to the selection bias. It enables to study the specificities of the seasonal migration and estimate migration incomes. The structural model of migration decision revealed the importance of migration as a mere survival strategy in the study regions confronted with severe scarcity of natural resources. Results supported that even under the pessimistic scenario where the direct benefits of the regional integration program would go exclusively to the polar economy, households in the Sahel may still benefit from an increased economic attractiveness of this destination. First, because it is seasonal, the increased migration will translate into higher liquidity that enables households to overcome credit and insurance market failures and invest in their main agropastoral activities. Second, an interesting finding is also the role of the unsecured livestock activity as impediment to migration of the pastoralist groups. The study recommended the development of policies that address security issues through well-functioning rural labor market institutions and enforceable rules regarding shepherd contracts. It is also important to enforce regional laws regarding the free movement of labor.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1819.pdf

E. "Household Time Allocation and Modes of Behavior: A Theory of Sorts," by Daniela Del Boca and Christopher Finn (Discussion Paper 1821, October 2005, .pdf format, 36p.).

Abstract:

We develop a simple model of household time allocation decisions under strong functional form assumptions regarding preferences and household production technology. We argue that the specification is general when allowing for unrestrictive forms of population heterogeneity in the parameters characterizing these functions. Moreover, we argue that the model is not capable of distinguishing among elements of a class of behavioral rules, including Nash bargaining and Nash equilibrium, without restricting population heterogeneity in arbitrary ways. However, preferences over mates for any given set of male and female characteristics will be a function of the behavioral rules used in married households. Using data from the PSID on market hours and time spent in household production, we estimate the marginal distribution of male and female characteristics and our two alternative behavioral assumptions, and perform some formal and informal comparisons of the Nash bargaining and Nash equilibrium rules' ability to predict the marital sorts observed in the data. Given the simplicity of the model of household behavior and marriage market equilibrium, it is perhaps not surprising that neither model provides good predictions. Overall, the evidence is slightly more supportive of the hypothesis that households behave noncooperatively.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1821.pdf

F. "Household Incomes and Redistribution in the European Union: Quantifying the Equalising Properties of Taxes and Benefits," by Herwig Immervoll, Horacio Levy, Christine Lietz, Daniela Mantovani, Cathal O'Donoghue, Holly Sutherland, and Gerlinde Verbist (Discussion Paper 1824, October 2005, .pdf format, 24p.).

Abstract:

The systems of direct taxes and cash benefits in the Member States of the European Union vary considerably in size and structure. We explore their direct impacts on cross-sectional income inequality (termed " redistributive effect" for the purpose of this paper) using EUROMOD, a tax-benefit microsimulation model for the European Union. This relies on harmonised household micro-data representative of each national population together with simulations of entitlements to cash benefits and liabilities for taxes and social contributions. It allows us to draw a more comprehensive--and comparable--picture of the combined effects of transfers and taxes than is usually possible. We decompose the redistributive effect of tax-benefit systems to assess and compare the effectiveness of individual policies at reducing income disparities. The following categories of benefits and taxes are considered both individually and in combination: income taxes, social contributions, cash benefits designed to target the poor or redistribute inter-personally (through means-testing) as well as cash benefits intended to redistribute intra-personally across the lifecycle (through social insurance or contingency-based entitlement). We derive results for the 15 "old" members of the European Union and present them for each country separately as well

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1824.pdf

G. "Does the Early Bird Catch the Worm? Instrumental Variable Estimates of Educational Effects of Age of School Entry in Germany," by Patrick A. Puhani and Andrea M. Weber (Discussion Paper 1827, October 2005, .pdf format, 48p.).

Abstract:

We estimate the effect of age of school entry on educational attainment using three different data sets for Germany, sampling pupils at the end of primary school, in the middle of secondary school and several years after secondary school. Results are obtained based on instrumental variable estimation exploiting the exogenous variation in month of birth. We find robust and significant positive effects on educational attainment for pupils who enter school at seven instead of six years of age: Test scores at the end of primary school increase by about 0.42 standard deviations and years of secondary schooling increase by almost half a year.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1827.pdf

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Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) [University of Essex, Colchester, UK]:

A. "Education and the Timing of Births:Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Italy," by Margherita Fort (WP 2005-20, October 2005, .pdf format, 6p.).

Abstract:

This paper assesses the causal effects of education on the timing of first births allowing for heterogeneity in the effects across individuals while controlling for self-selection of women into education. Identification relies on exogenous variation in schooling induced by a mandatory school reform rolled out nationwide in Italy in the early 1960s. Findings based on Census data (Italy, 1981) suggest that a large fraction of the women affected by the reform postpone the time of the first birth but catch up with this fertility delay before turning 26. There is some indication that the fertility return to schooling of these women is substantially different from the one of the average individual in the population.

http://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/pubs/workpaps/pdf/2005-20.pdf

B. "Poverty and Fertility in Less Developed Countries: A Comparative Analysis," by Arnstein Aassve, Henriette Engelhardt, Francesca Francavilla, Abbi Kedir, Jungho Kim, Fabrizia Mealli, Letizia Mencarini, Stephen Pudney, and Alexia Prskawetz (WP 2005-13, October 2005, .pdf format, 43p.).

Abstract:

Just as poverty analysis has a central part in Development Economics, studies of fertility behaviour have an equally important standing in the Demography literature. Poverty and fertility are two important aspects of welfare that are closely related. In this paper we use unique longitudinal data sources to study the relationship between poverty and fertility at household level over a two to five year period. In particular we compare the relationship between fertility and poverty in four countries: Albania, Ethiopia, Indonesia and Vietnam. These countries differ greatly in their history, average income, social structure, economic institutions and demographic features. We find that there is a substantial difference in the relative importance of the determinants of poverty dynamics and fertility; the persistence of high levels of fertility and poverty in Ethiopia is driven by lack of economic growth and poor access to family planning; education and health provision are crucial elements in reducing poverty and fertility, as is clear from Vietnam, Indonesia and Albania.

http://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/pubs/workpaps/pdf/2005-13.pdf

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Center for Economic Studies/Ifo Institute for Economic Research (CESifo): " Gentrification and Neighborhood Housing Cycles: Will America's Future Downtowns be Rich?," by Jan K. Brueckner and Stuart S. Rosenthal (CESifo Working Paper No. 1579, October 2005, .pdf format, 51p.).

Abstract:

This paper identifies a new factor, the age of the housing stock, that affects where high- and low-income neighborhoods are located in U.S. cities. High-income households, driven by a high demand for housing services, will tend to locate in areas of the city where the housing stock is relatively young. Because cities develop and redevelop from the center outward over time, the location of these neighborhoods varies over the city's history. The model predicts a suburban location for the rich in an initial period, when young dwellings are found only in the suburbs, while predicting eventual gentrification once central redevelopment creates a young downtown housing stock. Empirical work indicates that if the influence of spatial variation in dwelling ages were eliminated, longstanding central city/suburban disparities in neighborhood economic status would be reduced by up to 50 percent. Model estimates further predict that between 2000 and 2020, central-city/suburban differences in economic status will widen somewhat in smaller cities but narrow sharply in the largest American cities as they become more gentrified.

http://www.cesifo.de/portal/page?_pageid=36,302752&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL&p_file_id=11983

Click on "Download PDF" at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

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Crisis States Research Centre [London School of Economics]: "Urban Segregation from Below: Drugs, Consumption, and Primitive Accumulation in Managua, Nicaragua," by Dennis Rodgers (Working Paper No. 71, October 2005, .pdf format, 14p.).

Abstract:

This paper explores the emergence of new forms of urban segregation in contemporary Managua, Nicaragua. Although the country has historically always been characterised by high levels of socio-economic inequality - with the notable exception of the Sandinista revolutionary period (1979-1990), when disparities declined markedly - the past decade in particular has seen the development of new processes of exclusion and differentiation, especially in urban areas. In many ways, these are part of a broader regional trend; as several recent studies have noted, many other Latin American cities are undergoing similar mutations. The seminal investigation in this regard is undoubtedly Teresa Caldeira's City of Walls, which traces the way in which rising crime and insecurity have changed the cityscape of Sao Paolo, Brazil, transforming it from a space of open circulation to a fragmented archipelago of isolated "fortified enclaves". This new urban morphology is most visible in the proliferation of self-sufficient gated communities and closed condominiums for the affluent, which have significantly altered the character of urban space, as those on the 'inside' of the enclaves no longer relate to notions of spatial cohabitation with those on the 'outside', but rather to an ideal of separation from them.This paper examines urban Nicaragua where this phenomenon has arguably gone further than enclaves and has led to the emergence of a 'fortified network' for the elites which excludes the poor and has profoundly altered the cityscape.

http://www.crisisstates.com/Publications/wp/wp71.htm

Click on "Download in English" at the bottom of the abstract.

More information about CSRC:

http://www.crisisstates.com/Intro/index.htm

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "advanced search" C. Type in your publication name and click "Exact title" radio button D. Under "Show", click the "fax/ariel" radio button. E. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

Demography (Vol. 42, No. 3, 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

Journal of Health and Social Behavior (Vol. 46, No. 3, 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

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Other Journals:

AIDS [Official Journal of the International Aids Society] (Vol. 19, Supplement 4, October 2005).

http://www.aidsonline.com/pt/re/aids/toc.00002030-200511040-00000.htm

American Journal of Public Health (Vol. 95, No. 11, November 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

http://www.ajph.org/content/vol95/issue11/?etoc

The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science (Vol. 602, No. 1, November 2005).

http://ann.sagepub.com/archive/

European Journal of Public Health (Vol. 15, No. 5, October 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

http://eurpub.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol15/issue5/index.dtl

Family and Consumer Research Sciences Research Journal (Vol. 34, No. 2, December 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://fcs.sagepub.com/content/vol34/issue2/?etoc

Gender and Society (Vol. 19, No. 6, December 2005).

http://gas.sagepub.com/content/vol19/issue6/

Population and Development Review (Vol. 31, No. 3, September 2005).

http://www.popcouncil.org/publications/pdr/pdrtoc.html

Public Health Nursing (Vol. 22, No. 5, September 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/rd.asp?goto=journal&code=phn

Sociological Methods & Research (Vol. 34, No. 2, November 2005).

http://smr.sagepub.com/content/vol34/issue2/?etoc

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FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

National Institutes of Health:

A. "Delays in Grant Application Submission due to Hurricane Wilma" (NOT-OD-06-006, Oct. 25, 2005).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-06-006.html

B. "NIH Rolls Out Electronic Grant Submission" (Oct. 26, 2005).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/oct2005/od-26.htm

B. "Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health" (PAR-06-039, October 25, 2005). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-06-039.html

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RAND Fellows in Population Studies and the Study of Aging: "The RAND Fellows in Population Studies and the Study of Aging program enables outstanding junior scholars in demographic and aging research to sharpen their analytic skills, learn to communicate research results effectively, and advance their research agendae. Housed within the Labor and Population Program, the program blends formal and informal training and extensive collaboration with distinguished researchers in a variety of disciplines. In a typical year, the program will accept one fellow per year in Population Studies and one fellow per year in the Study of Aging. Fellowships are for one year, renewable for a second. Each fellow receives a yearly stipend of 46,000 to 61,000 dollars, depending on post-doctoral experience. For more information see:

http://www.rand.org/labor/fellows/

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Government of Canada/Gouvernement du Canada Global Health Research Initiative Teasdale-Corti Team Grants: "The Global Health Research Initiative (GHRI), a partnership between the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Health Canada, and the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), invites letters of intent from teams composed of Canadian and low- and middle- income country (LMIC) researchers and research users (e.g. policymakers, practitioners, and civil society organizations) interested in developing innovative multi-year programs that combine applied research, knowledge translation, and capacity building to solve pressing health problems in low- and middle- income countries (LMIC). Inspired by the ongoing legacy of Drs Lucille Teasdale and Piero Corti, the Teasdale-Corti Team Grants are the first major initiative undertaken by a new, collaborative health research program developed by the GHRI." For more information see the links available from the site after Oct. 31, 2005.

http://web.idrc.ca/en/ev-89700-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html

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LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES:

House Energy and Commerce Hearing Publication: "The Threat of and Planning for Pandemic Flu," a hearing held May 26, 2005 (House Serial Publication No. 109-21, ASCII text and .pdf format, 87p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/house05ch109.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "109-21" (without the quotes).

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DATA:

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Japanese General Social Survey (JGSS), 2002 (#4214)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04214.xml

Monitoring the Future: A Continuing Study of American Youth (8th- and 10th-Grade Surveys),2004 (#4263)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04263.xml

Monitoring the Future: A Continuing Study of American Youth (12th-Grade Survey), 2004 (#4264)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04264.xml

National Center for Early Development and Learning Multi-State Study of Pre-Kindergarten, 2001-2003 (#4283)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04283.xml

National Health Interview Survey, 2004 (#4349)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04349.xml

Recent updates and additions at ICPSR:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/access/recent.html

Click on "list" for link to updates and additions. New items are marked *new*.

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UK Data Archive (Essex University, Colchester, UK): The UK Data Archive has recently added the following dataset to its holdings. Note: There may be charges or licensing requirements on holdings of the UK Data Archive. For more information see:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/

Cross-Generational Investigation of the Making of Heterosexual Relationships, 1912-2003 (SN 5190)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5190

Offending, Crime and Justice Survey, 2003 (SN 5248)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5248

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National Center for Education Statistics: "NCES Handbooks Online (October 2005). "The NCES Data Handbooks provide guidance on consistency in data definitions and maintenance for education data, so that such data can be accurately aggregated and analyzed. The online Handbook database provides the Nonfiscal Handbooks in a searchable web tool. This database includes data elements for students, staff, and education institutions. The handbook has just been updated with new and emerging terms and definitions."

http://nces.ed.gov/programs/handbook/

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Medical Expenditure Panel Survey:

A. "MEPS HC-076:2003 Person Round Plan Public Use File" (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, August 2005, data in .zip and .exe self-decompressing ASCII and SAS transport format, SAS and SPSS programming statements, documentation in HTML, .pdf or ASP codebook format).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=190

B. "MEPS HC-036: MEPS 1996-2003 Pooled Estimation Linkage File," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, October 2005, data in .zip and .exe self-decompressing ASCII and SAS transport format, SAS and SPSS programming statements, documentation in HTML, .pdf or ASP codebook format).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=86

C. "MEPS HC-077A: 2003 Prescribed Medicines File," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, October 2005, data in .zip and .exe self-decompressing ASCII and SAS transport format, SAS and SPSS programming statements, documentation in HTML, .pdf or ASP codebook format). .

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=191

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Department of Housing and Urban Development: "2001-2003 CINCH (Components of Inventory Change) and Rental Dynamics" (October 2005, data available in .zip compressed ASCII and SAS format, accompanying information in .pdf format). "The CINCH program uses the longitudinal features of the American Housing Survey to look at the changes to individual housing units from one survey to the next. This provides information on the characteristics of units entering and leaving the housing stock. It also allows us to trace how housing units change over time. The Rental Dynamics program uses CINCH to examine changes in the affordability of rental housing. The program classifies such housing into affordability categories and traces whether they become more or less affordable, or whether they enter or leave the rental stock.

http://www.huduser.org/datasets/cinch/cinch01-03/cinch01-03.html

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Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey: "RLMS at the Carolina Population Center has announced Round 13 data availability. Note 1: a data request form and data-use agreement must be filed before acquiring the data. Note 2: "several new questions were added to the Employment section of the Adult questionnaire at Round 13. Most of these questions were added by the Russian government for internal use. The corresponding data are not being released at this time. We hope to make them available in the near future. The questions whose answers are not available have been shaded in the questionnaire and are not accompanied by variable names."

http://www.cpc.unc.edu/projects/rlms/data.html

More information about RLMS:

http://www.cpc.unc.edu/projects/rlms

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Luxembourg Income Study: "Standardized Education Recoding Routines" (October 27, 2005). The routines for the standardization of education level across countries have been improved.

For more info:

http://www.lisproject.org/dataccess/educlevel.htm

More information on LIS database access:

http://www.lisproject.org/dataccess.htm

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WEBSITES OF INTEREST:

KaiserEdu.org Update: Kaiser Family Foundation's educational arm, originally discussed in CDERR #26, Apr. 5, 2004 (http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cde/library/cderr/cderr26.htm#websites) has added the following items:

A. "Reproductive Health Policy Tutorial," by Usha Ranji (October 2005, tutorial requires audio software to hear running time 16 minutes, 16 minutes, 36 seconds, slides are available in Microsoft PowerPoint format Microsoft PowerPoint format).

http://www.kaiseredu.org/tutorials_index.asp

B. "Medicaid: The Basics" Reference Library

http://www.kaiseredu.org/topics_reflib.asp?id=128&parentid=65&rID=1

KaiserEdu.org:

http://www.kaiseredu.org/

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BIBLIOGRAPHY UPDATES

National Longitudinal Surveys: Note: These citations, along with all of the NLS bibliography, can be found at:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/

Note: Where available, direct links to full text have been provided. These references represent updated citations from Oct. 17 - Oct. 28, 2005.

For more information on any of these citations (selected abstracts are available) go to the above listed address and click on "Title List". Click on the first item, which will give the syntax of the citation urls:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/qtitle.php3?myrow[0]=320

Then change the number after the equal sign (320 in this case) to the number listed as the "ID Number" in the citations below. You will be taken to the full citation listing.

FINGER, REGINALD THELEN, TONYA VESSEY, JOHN T. MOHN, JOANNA K. MANN, JOSHUA R.
Association of Virginity at Age 18 with Educational, Economic, Social, and Health Outcomes in Middle Adulthood
Adolescent and Family Health 3,4 (2005): 164-170. Also: http://www.afhjournal.org/docs/030405.asp
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 5131
Publisher: Institute for Youth Development

BOPKOVA, VALENTINA
Social and Emotional Development of Children 0 to 36 Months in Poverty
Ph. D. Dissertation, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 2005. Also: http://etd.utk.edu/2005/BopkovaValentina.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 5132
Publisher: ProQuest Information and Learning

WHEELER, CHRISTOPHER H.
Cities and the Growth of Wages Among Young Workers Evidence from the NLSY
Working Paper 2005-055A, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, 2005. Also: http://research.stlouisfed.org/wp/more/2005-055
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 5133
Publisher: Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

WHEELER, CHRISTOPHER H.
Local Market Scale and the Pattern of Job Changes Among Young Men
Working Paper 2005-033A, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, 2005. Also: http://research.stlouisfed.org/wp/more/2005-033
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 5134
Publisher: Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

AMUEDO-DORANTES, CATALINA KIMMEL, JEAN
Moonlighting Behavior over the Business Cycle
IZA Discussion Paper No. 1671, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit, Bonn, Germany, 2005. Also: http://www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/papers/viewAbstract?dp%5Fid=1671
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 5135
Publisher: Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

GREEN, CAROLE FERBER, MARIANNE A.
Do Detailed Work Histories Help to Explain Gender and Race/Ethnic Wage Differentials?
Review of Social Economy 63,1 (March 2005): 55-85. Also: http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/link.asp?id=w75356p73042g088
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 5137
Publisher: Association for Social Economics

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-- Jack Solock
Data Librarian--
Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu