Current Demographic Research Report #106, October 24, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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CDERR is compiled and edited by Jack Solock, Kristin Wick, and Charlie Fiss of the University of Wisconsin Center for Demography and Ecology Information Services Center.

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NOTE! Index Items marked with *** indicate there are related articles. Articles can be found with the item in the body of the report. We cannot guarantee the permanence of related article addresses. They may be available in Lexis-Nexis, ProQuest Newspapers. Check your organization's library.

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Index to this issue:

CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

U.S.:

National Center for Education Statistics Reports***, Website

National Institutes of Health News Release: "Teens with Deletion Syndrome Confirm Gene's Role in Psychosis"

National Center for Health Statistics Report: "Summary Health Statistics for U. S. Children: National Health Interview Survey, 2004"

Centers for Disease Control _Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_ Article: "Influenza Vaccination Levels Among Persons Aged >65 Years and Among Persons Aged 18--64 Years with High-Risk Conditions --- United States, 2003"

Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistical Briefs

US Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Statistics Report: " College Enrollment Status and Past Year Illicit Drug Use among Young Adults: 2002, 2003, and 2004"

Government Accountability Office Correspondence: "Immigration Benefits: Thirteenth Report Required by the Haitian Refugee Immigration Fairness Act of 1998"

Bureau of Justice Statistics Reports

US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Report: " State-Level Predictors of Food Insecurity and Hunger Among Households With Children"

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United Nations:

United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific: " Statistical Indicators for Asia and the Pacific"

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European Commission:

European Commission Eurostat News Release: "Social protection expenditure in the EU25 accounted for 27.7% of GDP"

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Australia:

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Report: "Indigenous Housing Needs 2005 - a Multi-measure Needs Model"

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Hong Kong:

Hong Kong Census & Statistics Department News Release: "Thematic Household Survey Report No. 21 Published"***

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Iceland:

Statistics Iceland News Release: "Graduates at the upper secondary and tertiary levels in 2003-2004"

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Ireland:

Central Statistics Office Ireland Compendium: _Statistical Yearbook of Ireland 2005 Edition_

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Netherlands:

Statistics Netherlands Web Magazine Article: "Young men heaviest drinkers"

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Poland:

Central Statistics Office of Poland Compendium: _Concise Statistical Yearbook of Poland 2005_

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Saint Lucia:

Saint Lucia Government Statistics Department Report: "The 2001 Population and Housing Census Final Report (Draft Copy)

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Scotland:

General Register Office for Scotland Report: "Projected Population of Scotland (2004-based)" ***

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Turkey:

Republic of Turkey, Prime Ministry State Institute of Statistics Report: " Attitudes of Individuals towards European Union Membership in Turkey"***

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

_Demographic Research_ Articles

World Bank Monograph: _Growth, Poverty, and Inequality: Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union_

_Economia_ Panel Meeting Paper: "Early Childhood Development in Latin America and the Caribbean"

Politics of Health Group Report: "UK Health Watch 2005: The Experience of Health in an Unequal Society"

Population Reference Bureau Article: "Did Worldwide Inequality Drop Between 1960 and 2000?"

Kaiser Family Foundation Reports

Employee Health Benefit Research Notes

Amnesty International Report: "The Rest of Their Lives: Life without Parole for Child Offenders in the United States"

Casey Family Programs Report: "Protecting Children in Foster Care"

Human Security Center Report: "The Human Security Report 2005: War and Peace in the 21st Century"***

_Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences_ Article Reprint: " Assimilation and differences between the settlement patterns of individual immigrants and immigrant households"

_British Medical Journal_ Article, Article Abstract, Book Review Extracts

_Lancet_ Article: "Saving lives in the aftermath of Pakistan's earthquake"

_Economist_ Article: "Vaccination: A drop of pure gold"

WORKING PAPERS

California Center for Population Research
Center for Research on Child Wellbeing (Princeton University)
Institute for Behavioral Science (University of Colorado-Boulder)
World Bank Policy Research Programme
International Monetary Fund
Luxembourg Income Study
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM)
King's Fund (London)

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Other Journals

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees

LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES

Senate Indian Affairs Committee Hearing Publication: "Acknowledgment and Apology, on S.J. Res. 15 to Acknowledge a Long History of Official Depredations and Ill-Conceived Policies by the U.S. Government Regarding Indian Tribes and Offer an Apology to All Native Peoples on Behalf of the United States"

House Committee on Energy and Commerce Hearing Publication: "Setting the Path for Reauthorization: Improving Portfolio Management At The NIH,"

DATA

Census Bureau: "Estimated Daytime Population"

International Agency for Research on Cancer/Centre International de Recherche sur le Cancer Databases

Center for Research on Child Wellbeing: "Fragile Families Three-Year Public Use Data

National Longitudinal Survey

Bureau of Labor Statistics Web Based Data Extractors

UK Data Archive

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

U.S.

1. National Center for Education Statistics Reports, Website:

A. "Reading and Mathematics Results for Grades 4 and 8," (October 19, 2005). "National and state-by-state results of the 2005 Nation's Report Card in reading and mathematics, detailing fourth and eighth grade achievement on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) were just released. Findings since the previous assessment in 2003 show: Fourth-grade students scored higher in both reading and mathematics; Eighth-graders scored higher in mathematics, but reading scores decreased; Many of the differences in achievement between Black or Hispanic students and their White counterparts have narrowed; Most states did not see a change in reading scores for 4th or 8th graders; and, Thirty-three states and jurisdictions showed an increase in 4th-grade mathematics scores."

For more information:

http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/

For individual reports:

"The Nation's Report Card: Mathematics 2005," by Marianne Perie, Wendy S. Grigg, and Gloria S. Dion (NCES 2006453. October 2005, .pdf format, 52p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006453

"NAEP Mathematics 2005 State Snapshot Reports" (NCES 2006454. October 2005, .pdf format).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006454

"The Nation's Report Card: Reading 2005," by Marianne Perie, Wendy S. Grigg, and Patricia L. Donahue (NCES 2006451, October 2005, .pdf format, 52p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006451

NAEP Reading 2005 State Snapshot Reports" (NCES 2006452, October 2005, .pdf format).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006452

Related article:

"Test Scores Move Little in Math, Reading," by Lois Romano (_Washington Post_, Oct. 20, 2005). Note: _WP_ requires free registration before providing articles. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/10/19/AR2005101900708.html

B. "Independent Undergraduates: 1999-2000," by Christina Chang Wei, Stephanie Nevill, and Lutz Berkner (Post Secondary Analysis Description Report (PEDAR) NCES 2005151, September 2005, .pdf format, 103p.).

Abstract:

This report provides a comprehensive look at independent students who were enrolled in postsecondary education in the United States and Puerto Rico in 1999-2000. Independent students are assumed to be financially self-sufficient and no longer dependent upon their parents to support them or finance their education. Many independent students work full time and attend community colleges or other postsecondary institutions that are geared toward career training in specialized fields such as health, technology, and business. Working, as many hours as they do, independent students are more likely to enroll in postsecondary institutions part time. They are less likely than dependent students to apply for financial aid, and are less likely to apply for it on time, or before the typical May 1 deadline for state and institutional aid. Among those who do apply for aid, independent students are less likely than dependent students to receive state and institutional grants, more likely to receive Pell Grants and, although they are less likely to take out student loans, the average amount they borrow is larger. Being married or having children are characteristics common to independent students, and while being married can raise one's income, having children can increase one's living expenses considerably.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005151

C. "Statewide Education Data Profiles" (October, 2005). "Search for statewide information in elementary/secondary education, postsecondary education, public libraries and selected demographics for all states in the U.S. You can select up to 4 states to compare at a time. In addition to getting statewide data you will also get data on U.S. averages and the ability to dynamically graph the results. The data used for this data tool comes from many NCES sources and has just been updated with 2003 public library information and 2004-05 postsecondary education information."

http://nces.ed.gov/programs/stateprofiles/

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2. National Institutes of Health News Release: "Teens with Deletion Syndrome Confirm Gene's Role in Psychosis" (Oct. 23, 2005).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/oct2005/nimh-23.htm

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3. National Center for Health Statistics Report: "Summary Health Statistics for U. S. Children: National Health Interview Survey, 2004" (Vital and Health Statistics Series 10, No. 227, October 2005, .pdf format, 159p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_10/sr10_227.pdf

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4. Centers for Disease Control _Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_ Articles: "Influenza Vaccination Levels Among Persons Aged >65 Years and Among Persons Aged 18--64 Years with High-Risk Conditions --- United States, 2003" (_Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_, Vol. 54, No. 41, October 21, 2005, .pdf and HTML format, p. 1045-1049).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5441a3.htm

PDF:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5441.pdf

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5. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistical Briefs:

A. "Prescription Drugs: Out-of-Pocket Expenses and Unmet Need Relative to Family Income, 2002," by Beth Levin Crimmel, and Marie N. Stagnitti (Agency for Health Care Research and Quality, MEPS Statistical Brief No. 102, October 2005, .pdf format, 5p.).

Abstract:

Using data from the Household Component of the 2002 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-HC), this Statistical Brief discusses out-of-pocket expenses and unmet need related to obtaining prescription drugs for the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized (community) population in 2002. The analysis examines these topics relative to family income for families with out-of-pocket expenses less than or equal to 5 percent of income and for those with expenses greater than 5 percent of income. Results are provided separately for families with an elderly member (a person age 65 or older) and for families without an elderly member.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=715

Link to full text is at the bottom of the abstract.

B. "Variations in Smoking by Selected Demographic, Socioeconomic, Insurance, and Health Characteristics, United States, 2003" by Kelly Carper and Steven R. Machlin (Agency for Health Care Research and Quality, MEPS Statistical BriefNo. 101, October 2005, .pdf format, 7p.).

Abstract:

Using data from the Household Component of the 2003 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-HC), this Statistical Brief presents estimates on the smoking status of adults, age 18 or older, in the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized (community) population in 2003 by selected characteristics, including age, race/ethnicity, sex, education, insurance coverage, and health conditions. Additional estimates are provided on routine check-ups and smoking cessation counseling.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=714

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6. Government Accountability Office Correspondence: "Immigration Benefits: Thirteenth Report Required by the Haitian Refugee Immigration Fairness Act of 1998" (GAO-06-122R, Oct. 21, 2005, .pdf format, 6p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d06122r.pdf

Note: This is a temporary addresses. GAO correspondence may be available at:

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gaoreports/index.html

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7. Bureau of Justice Statistics Reports:

A. "Prisoners in 2004," Paige M. Harrison and Allen J. Beck (NCJ 210677, October 2005, compressed, ASCII, and .pdf format, 14p., with .zip compressed spreadsheets).

Abstract:

Reports the number of persons in State and Federal prisons at year-end, compares the increase in the prison population during 2004 with that of the previous year, and gives the prison growth rates since 1995. The report also provides the number of male and female prisoners on December 31, 2004. It includes incarceration rates for the States and the 5 highest and 5 lowest jurisdictions for selected characteristics, such as the growth rate, number of prisoners held, and incarceration rates. Tables present data on prison capacities and the use of local jails and privately operated prisons. Estimates are provided on the number of sentenced prisoners by age, gender, race, and Hispanic origin.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/p04.htm

B. "Compendium of Federal Justice Statistics, 2003," by Steven K. Smith, Mark Motivans, Laura Winterfield, William Adams, Avi Bhati, Kamala Mallik Kane, Barbara Parthasarathy, Christine Arriola, and Yan Yuan. (NCJ 210299, October 2005, ASCII text, and .pdf format, 132p., with .zip compressed spreadsheets).

Abstract:

Presents national-level statistics describing characteristics of persons processed and the distribution of case processing outcomes at each major stage of the Federal criminal justice system. This annual report includes investigations by U.S. attorneys, prosecutions and declinations, pretrial release and detention, convictions and acquittals, sentencing, appeals, and correctional populations. New this year are statistics on fugitive investigations by the U.S. Marshals Service. This is an electronic only document.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/cfjs03.htm

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8. US Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Statistics Report: " College Enrollment Status and Past Year Illicit Drug Use among Young Adults: 2002, 2003, and 2004" (National Survey on Drug Use and Health, October 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k5/College/college.cfm

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9. US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Report: " State-Level Predictors of Food Insecurity and Hunger Among Households With Children," by Judi Bartfeld and Rachel Dunifon (Contractor and Cooperator Report No. CCR13, October 2005, .pdf format, 60p.).

Abstract:

This report examines interstate variation in household food security. Using hierarchical modeling, we identify several contextual dimensions that appear linked to household food security: the availability and accessibility of Federal nutrition assistance programs, policies affecting economic well-being of low-income families, and States' economic and social characteristics. These dimensions comprise what we refer to as the State food security infrastructure. We find that a strong food security infrastructure particularly benefits families that are economically vulnerable yet have incomes above the poverty line. Almost all of the observed interstate differences in food security can be explained by cross-State differences in demographic and contextual characteristics.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/CCR13/

Link to full text is at the bottom of the abstract.

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United Nations:

United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific: " Statistical Indicators for Asia and the Pacific--Third Quarter, September 2005" (October 2005, .pdf format).

http://www.unescap.org/publications/detail.asp?id=1111

Click on "View Full Text".

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European Commission:

European Commission Eurostat News Release: "Social protection expenditure in the EU25 accounted for 27.7% of GDP" (Oct. 20, 2005, .pdf format, 2p.).

http://epp.eurostat.cec.eu.int/pls/portal/docs/PAGE/PGP_PRD_CAT_PREREL/PGE_CAT_PREREL_YEAR_2005/PGE_CAT_PREREL_YEAR_2005_MONTH_10/3-20102005-EN-BP.PDF

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Australia:

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Report: "Indigenous Housing Needs 2005 - a Multi-measure Needs Model" (October 2005, .pdf format, 111p.).

Abstract:

"The Indigenous Housing Needs 2005: A Multi-measure Needs Model" report is the Institute's first report to assesses Indigenous housing needs with the use of a multi-measure needs model. The report presents data on the five endorsed dimensions of need-homelessness, overcrowding, affordability, dwelling conditions and connection to essential services. It also assess the feasibility of including an additional three dimensions in the model-appropriateness of housing, security of tenure and emerging housing needs. The report also compares housing outcomes of Indigenous and non-Indigenous households for all the relevant dimensions. It demonstrates a significant level of housing need among Indigenous households for most of the dimensions examined. The report also shows that serious disparities exist between Indigenous and non-Indigenous housing in Australia. The report also discuses future data development needs and priorities. The report is a useful resource for policy makers, administrators, Indigenous people and researchers with an interest in Indigenous housing issues.

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10166

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Hong Kong:

Hong Kong Census & Statistics Department News Release: Note: Cancel any request to download a Chinese language character set. This article is in English. "Thematic Household Survey Report No. 21 Published". "The Thematic Household Survey Report No. 21 is published by the Census and Statistics Department (C&SD) today (October 21).This report contains the findings of the Thematic Household Survey conducted during June to August 2004, which collected information relating to the pattern of study in higher education as well as the socio-demographic profile, health status and long-term care needs of older persons."

http://www.info.gov.hk/censtatd/eng/press/ops/200510/ops20051021_index.html

At the bottom of the news release there is a link to "broad survey findings". Click on this link and then scroll to the three summaries under " June - August 2004 (Detailed findings in Thematic Household Survey Report No. 21)". They are: "Pattern of study in higher education," " Socio-demographic profile, health status and long-term care needs of older persons residing in domestic households," and "Socio-demographic profile, health status and long-term care needs of older persons residing in institutions" (each is .pdf format, 2p., in Chinese and English. Ordering information for full reports is linked to from the news release.

Related article: "70% of students pursue higher education in HK" (news.gov.hk, Oct. 21, 2005). http://news.gov.hk/en/category/atschool/051021/html/051021en02002.htm

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Iceland:

Statistics Iceland News Release: "Graduates at the upper secondary and tertiary levels in 2003-2004" (Oct. 18, 2005). Note: at the bottom of the news release there is a link to a web based extractor for Icelandic statistics on "Upper Secondary Schools" and Universities.

http://www.statice.is/?PageID=444&NewsID=1202

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Ireland:

Central Statistics Office Ireland Compendium: _Statistical Yearbook of Ireland 2005 Edition_ (October 2005, .pdf format, 466p.). Note: pricing information for obtaining a print copy is available at the site:

http://www.cso.ie/releasespublications/statistical_yearbook_ireland_2005.htm

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Netherlands:

Statistics Netherlands Web Magazine Article: "Young men heaviest drinkers" (Oct. 18, 2005).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/mens-maatschappij/leefsituatie/publicaties/artikelen/2005-1791-wm.htm

All web magazine articles back to October 2004:

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/publicaties/webpublicaties/webmagazine/default.htm

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Poland:

Central Statistics Office of Poland Compendium: _Concise Statistical Yearbook of Poland 2005_ (July 2005, .pdf format, 679p.). Note: The yearbook is in Polish and English

http://www.stat.gov.pl/english/opracowania_zbiorcze/maly_rocznik_stat/2005/index.htm

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Saint Lucia:

Saint. Lucia Government Statistics Department Report: "The 2001 Population and Housing Census Final Report (Draft Copy) (2005, .pdf format, 99p.)

http://www.stats.gov.lc/cenpub_f.pdf

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Scotland:

General Register Office for Scotland Report: "Projected Population of Scotland (2004-based)" (October 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 28p.). The report is linked to from a GROS news release: "Population expected to rise and age" (Oct. 20, 2005).

http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/press/news2005/04-pop-proj-press.html

Click on "Projected Population of Scotland (2004-based)" for link to full text.

Related articles:

"The population is falling and we've got plenty of room -- immigrants could solve Scotland's problems if only we let them in," by Ian Bell (_Sunday Herald_ [Glasgow], Oct. 23, 2005).

http://www.sundayherald.com/52416

"Scotland's economy at risk from growing grey army," by Angus McLeod (_Times_ [London], Oct. 21, 2005). http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-1835872,00.html

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Turkey:

Republic of Turkey, Prime Ministry State Institute of Statistics Report: " Attitudes of Individuals towards European Union Membership in Turkey" (2005, .pdf or .zip compressed .pdf format, 25p.). Note: This report is in Turkish and English. The individual .pdf chapters can be downloaded in .pdf, the entire report can be downloaded as in .zip compressed .pdf format (all parts)).

http://www.die.gov.tr/yma/ymaAB_eng.htm

Related Articles:

"Greeks split over Turkey in EU" (_Kathimerini_ [Athens], Oct. 22, 2005). http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_politics_100010_22/10/2005_62185

"In Turkey, the Novelist as Lightning Rod," by Stephen Kinzer (_New York Times_, Oct. 23, 2005). Note: _NYT_ requires free registration before providing articles http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/23/weekinreview/23word.html

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC:

_Demographic Research_ Article: Note: _DR_ is "a free, expedited, peer-reviewed journal of the population sciences published by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research [Rostock, Germany].

A. "On stochastic comparisons of population age structures and life expectancies," by Maxim S. Finkelstein (Vol. 13, Article 6, October 19, 2005, .pdf format, p. 143-162).

Abstract:

Cohort measures, describing a lifetime random variable are easily and unambiguously obtained using standard tools. On the contrary, the lifetime random variable, and therefore life expectancy, for the period setting cannot be unambiguously defined without additional simplifying assumptions. For non-stationary populations the corresponding conventional period measures should be justified in some way. Our paper is based on Bongaarts and Feeney (2002). We consider different measures of life expectancy and compare them for specific populations using stochastic ordering of the corresponding random variables. This gives possibility to look at the problem in a more general way.

B. "Decomposing the change in labour force indicators over time," by Alexia Prskawetz, Barbara Zagaglia, Thomas Fent, and Vegard Skirbekk (Vol. 13, Article 7, October 2005, .pdf format, p. 163-188),

Abstract:

In this paper we study changes in the size and the composition of the labour force in five OECD countries from 1983 through 2000. We apply a recent decomposition method to quantify the components of the change over time in the crude labour force rate and the mean age of the labour force. Our results show that the change in the crude labour force rate was dominated by the change in age-specific labour force participation rates. For the mean age of the labour force we find that for males the change in the age composition of the population predominately explains the overall change while the results for females are less clear-cut.

http://www.demographic-research.org/

Click on "Enter".

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World Bank Monograph: _Growth, Poverty, and Inequality: Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union_, by Asad Alam, Mamta Murthi, Ruslan Yemtsov, Edmundo Murrugarra, Nora Dudwick, Ellen Hamilton, and Erwin Tiongson (2005, .pdf format, 302p.). "Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union have witnessed a significant decrease in poverty since the Russian financial crisis of 1998-99. Almost 40 million people moved out of poverty from 1998-2003. Three key factors contributed to poverty reduction: growth in wages, growth in employment, and more adequate social transfers. But poverty and vulnerability persist: more than 60 million people live on less than 2 dollars a day. In their recommendations, the report's authors urge countries to continue with enterprise sector reforms, boost rural growth, promote opportunities in lagging regions, increase access to good quality basic services, and produce better social safety nets especially for the working poor and children.

http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/COUNTRIES/ECAEXT/0,,contentMDK:20627214~pagePK:146736~piPK:146830~theSitePK:258599,00.html

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_Economia_ Panel Meeting Paper: "Early Childhood Development in Latin America and the Caribbean," by Norbert Schady, to be presented at the 12th _Economia_ Panel Meeting, to be held in Paris, France, Oct. 27, 2005 (September 2005, .pdf format, 28p.).

Abstract:

There is considerable evidence that young children in many developing countries suffer from profound deficits in nutrition, health, fine and gross motor skills, cognitive development, and socio-emotional development. Early Childhood Development (ECD) outcomes are important markers of the welfare of children in their own right. In addition, the deleterious effects of poor ECD outcomes can be long-lasting, affecting school attainment, employment, wages, criminality, and measures of social integration of adults. We discuss ECD outcomes in Latin America and the Caribbean. The paper considers the theoretical case to be made for investments in ECD, selectively reviews the literature on the impact of ECD programs in the United States, discusses the evidence from Latin America and the Caribbean, and makes suggestions for future research. The focus is on the relation between ECD and measures of household socioeconomic status, child health, and parenting practices, as well as on the impact of specific policies and programs. We conclude that the knowledge base on ECD is still thin in Latin America and the Caribbean. There are therefore very high returns to comparative descriptive analysis of ECD outcomes in the region, as well to careful evaluations of the impact of various programs.

http://www.cid.harvard.edu/Economia/Papers%20Upcoming%20Meeting/Schady%20092305.pdf

More information about _Economia_:

http://www.cid.harvard.edu/Economia/index.htm

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Politics of Health Group Report: "UK Health Watch 2005: The Experience of Health in an Unequal Society" (October 2005, .pdf format, 162p.).

http://www.pohg.org.uk/support/downloads/ukhealthwatch-2005.pdf

More information on POHG:

http://www.pohg.org.uk/support/about.html

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Population Reference Bureau Article:"Did Worldwide Inequality Drop Between 1960 and 2000?" by Robert Lalasz (September 2005).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/05_Articles/Did_Worldwide_Inequality_Drop_Between_1960_and_2000_.htm

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Kaiser Family Foundation Reports:

A. "New State Surveys Show State Budgetary Pressures on Medicaid Easing, But Long-Term Challenges for Program Remain" (October 2005, .pdf format). " Three KCMU (Kaiser Commission for Medicaid and the Uninsured) state surveys indicate improving economy and sustained state cost-containment actions have improved the outlook for Medicaid and SCHIP, but long-term challenges remain due to factors affecting overall health care system." The reports, as well as a news release and summary of findings are linked from the page.

http://www.kff.org/medicaid/kcmu101905pkg.cfm

B. "Health Care Coverage and Financing Issues in California: An October 2005 Update," by Molly O'Malley and Peter Long (aiser Commission for Medicaid and the Uninsured, Issue Brief, October 2005, .pdf format, 11p.). " This brief summarizes recent health insurance coverage trends in California and the Medi-Cal program, provides an overview of the state's newly adopted FY 2005-06 budget agreement, and discusses key issues driving the current health policy agenda. The brief concludes with a discussion on Medicaid reform actions at the federal level and the potential implications for California."

http://www.kff.org/medicaid/7382.cfm

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Employee Health Benefit Research Notes:

A. "Uninsured Unchanged in 2004, But Employment-Based Health Coverage Declined," (EBRI Notes, October 2005, Vol. 26, No. 10, .pdf format, 12p.).

http://www.ebri.org/pdf/EBRI_Notes_10-2005.pdf

B. "2005 Health Confidence Survey: Cost and Quality Not Linked," (EBRI Notes, November 2005, Vol. 26, No. 11, .pdf format, 12p. ).

http://www.ebri.org/pdf/EBRI_Notes_11-2005.pdf

More information about EBRI:

http://www.ebri.org/about/facts/

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Amnesty International Report: "The Rest of Their Lives: Life without Parole for Child Offenders in the United States" (2005, .pdf format, 167p.). The report is linked to from an _AI_ news release: "The Rest of Their Lives: Life without Parole for Child Offenders in the United States: A joint report by Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International" (Oct. 12. 2005).

http://www.amnestyusa.org/news/document.do?id=ENGUSA2005101205002

Click on "Download the full report" at the bottom of the news release.

More information on _AI_:

http://www.amnestyusa.org/index.html

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Casey Family Programs Report: "Protecting Children in Foster Care," by by David Rubin, Neal Halfon, Ramesh Raghavan, and Sara Rosenbaum (2005, .pdf format, 33p.).

http://www.casey.org/NR/rdonlyres/82939E18-AE8D-421A-B4CE-019786B6E9D9/499/MedicaidReport.pdf

More information on CFP:

http://www.casey.org/AboutCasey/

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Human Security Center Report: "The Human Security Report 2005: War and Peace in the 21st Century, edited by Andrew Mack and Zoe Nielsen (2005, .pdf format, 158p.).

http://www.humansecurityreport.info/index.php?option=content&task=view&id=28&Itemid=63

More information about the HSC can be found in the report.

Related article:

"A welcome surprise: war waning globally," by Howard LaFranchi (_Christian Science Monitor_ [Boston, Massachusetts], Oct. 18, 2005). http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/1018/p01s01-wogi.html

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_Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences_ Article Reprint: " Assimilation and differences between the settlement patterns of individual immigrants and immigrant households," by Mark Ellis and Richard Wright (Vol. 102, No. 43, Oct. 25, 2005, .pdf format, p. 15325-15330). The article is linked to from a University of Washington news release: "Who people live with, not where, gives different picture of immigrants in U.S." (Oct. 19, 2005).

http://www.uwnews.org/article.asp?articleID=12899

Click on "Immigration paper" for link to full text.

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_British Medical Journal_ Article, Article Abstract, Book Review Extract:

A. "Self reported health and mortality: ecological analysis based on electoral wards across the United Kingdom," by Dermot O'Reilly, Michael Rosato, and Chris Patterson (Vol. 331, No. 7522, Oct. 22, 2005, p. 938-939). Note: This article may or may not be freely available to the public.

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/331/7522/938

B. "Bias from requiring explicit consent from all participants in observational research: prospective, population based study," by Rustam Al-Shahi, Celine Vousden, and Charles Warlow (article abstract, Vol. 331, No. 7522, Oct. 22, 2005, 6p.).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/abstract/331/7522/942

C. _Disease and Democracy: The Industrialised World Faces AIDS_, by Peter Baldwin, reviewed by Jennifer Prah Ruger (book review, Vol. 331, No. 7522, Oct. 22, 2005, p. 970).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/331/7522/970

D. _Integration of Public Health with Adaptation to Climate Change: Lessons Learned and New Directions_, edited by Kristie L. Ebi, Joel B. Smith, and Ian Burton, reviewed by Ian Roberts (book review, Vol. 331, NO. 7522, Oct. 22, 2005, p. 971).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/331/7522/971

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_Lancet_ Article: Note: _Lancet_ requires free registration before providing content. "Saving lives in the aftermath of Pakistan's earthquake," by Khabir Ahmad (Vol. 366, No. 9495, Oct. 22, 2005, p. 1423-1424).

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140673605675836/fulltext

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_Economist_ Article: "Vaccination: A drop of pure gold" (Oct. 13, 2005).

http://www.economist.com/displaystory.cfm?story_id=5017166

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WORKING PAPERS:

California Center for Population Research:

A. "Can Differential Exposure to Risk Factors Explain Recent Racial and Ethnic Variation in Marital Disruption?," by Julie A. Phillips and Megan M. Sweeney (CCPR-034-05, March 2005, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

Large racial and ethnic differentials in the risk of marital disruption are observed in the United States, with Blacks exhibiting higher rates of disruption than many other groups. We use data from the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth to investigate whether racial/ethnic differences in exposure to risk factors for disruption can explain variation in levels of marital instability across groups. We consider a wide array of risk factors for disruption and offer one of the few recent analyses of marital instability among Mexican-American women. Our results suggest that, if differences in population composition between groups were removed, the White-Black and Black-Mexican differentials in disruption would be reduced by approximately 30% and 50%, respectively. The story regarding the White-Mexican differential is more complicated, however, and hinges on nativity status of Mexican women. Finally, in light of large differences in marital instability between U.S.-born and foreign-born Mexican women, we also explore the possibility that compositional differences might contribute to differentials in marital instability between these two groups.

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/ccpr_034_05.asp

B. "Work-Family Conflict and Retirement Preferences," by James M. Raymo and Megan M. Sweeney (CCPR-035-05, June 2005, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

Objectives: This study investigates relationships between perceived levels of work-family conflict and retirement preferences.

Methods: Using the large sample of 52-54 year-old respondents to the 1992 Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, we estimate multinomial logistic regression models of preferences for partial and full retirement within the next ten years. We examine the association between preferences for retirement and perceived work-family conflict, evaluate the extent to which work-family conflict is a mediating mechanism between stressful work and family circumstances and preferences for retirement, and explore potential gender differences in the association between work-family conflict and retirement preferences.

Results: Work-family conflict is positively related to preferences for both full and partial retirement. Yet work-family conflict does not appear to mediate relationships between stressful work and family environments and retirement preferences, nor do significant gender differences emerge in this association.

Discussion: Our analyses provide the first direct evidence of the role played by work-family conflict in the early stages of the retirement process, although we are not able to identify the sources of conflict underlying this relationship. Identifying the sources of this conflict and the psychological mechanisms linking work-family conflict to retirement preferences is an important task for subsequent research.

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/ccpr_035_05.asp

Click on "Full Text" at the bottom of the page for link to full text.

C. "Intragenerational Job mobility in a Period of Rapidly Rising Inequality: The Case of Mid-Career Men in the Czech Republic in the 1990s," by Dana Hamplova and Martin Kreidl (CCPR-036-05, October 2005, .pdf format, 42p.).

Abstract:

Former socialist countries experienced dramatic changes in the organization and structure of their economies and labor markets in the 1990s. While the impact of those changes on the distribution of income and earnings has been thoroughly studied already, less is known about their consequences for patterns of occupational and labor market mobility. In this text we examine how the incorporation of the Czech Republic into the global economy and changes in employment and labor market policies impacted the frequency and patterns of job-to-job, job-to-unemployment, and unemployment-to-job mobility of Czech mid-career men between 1989 and 1998. Using single and competing risks survival models we show the growing dispersion of labor market risks--most notably the risk of unemployment- across social strata after 1995, when the period of relative social stability ended. Contrary to expectations, however, those changes were quite modest and we assume that other economic actors- e.g. younger and older male employees and women of all ages - might have been exposed to higher levels of risk resulting from the restructuring of the economy.

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/ccpr_036_05.asp

Click on "Full Text" at the bottom of the page for link to full text.

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Center for Research on Child Wellbeing (Princeton University): "Children's Overweight and Obesity at Age Three: Explaining the Racial and Ethnic Differentials," by Rachel Tolbert Kimbro, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, and Sara McLanahan (Working Paper No. 2005-27-FF, October 2005, .pdf format, 21p.).

Abstract:

Objectives. We estimate racial and ethnic differences in overweight and obesity at age three for a national sample of 2,271 urban, low-income three-year-olds, and test possible determinants of those differences. Methods. Survey, in-home, and interview data were collected at birth, one year, and three years. Using logistic regression and adjusting for a range of covariates, we attempt to explain children's racial and ethnic differences in overweight and obesity. Results. Thirty-five percent of the sample is overweight or obese (>85th percentile), but Hispanic children are twice as likely as either black or white children to be overweight or obese. Despite controlling for a wide variety of characteristics, we are unable to explain either the white-Hispanic or the black-Hispanic difference in overweight and obesity. However, birth weight, taking a bottle to bed, the mother's access to a grocery store, and the mother's own weight status are important predictors of children's overweight or obesity at age three. Conclusions. Children's problems with overweight and obesity begin as young as age three, and Hispanic children and those with obese mothers are especially at risk.

http://crcw.princeton.edu/workingpapers/WP05-27-FF.pdf

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Institute for Behavioral Science (University of Colorado-Boulder):

A. "Population Growth in High Amenity Rural Areas: Does It Bring New Opportunity for Long-Term Residents?" by Jarron M. Saint Onge, Lori M. Hunter, and Jason D. Boardman (POP2005-07, 2005, .pdf format, 26p.).

Abstract:

Objectives. This manuscript examines change in occupational prestige during the 1990s for long-term residents of high amenity, high growth rural counties. A noted concern with amenity-driven rural population growth is its potential to yield only low-wage service sector employment for long-term residents, while concomitantly raising local costs-of-living. Methods. We use established measures of natural amenities to delineate amenity and/or recreational rural areas that have experienced rapid in-migration since the 1970s. Using longitudinal data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics in conjunction with county-level information, we use growth curve models to examine if occupational prestige of long-term residents is shaped by amenity-related immigration. Results. We find that residents in high growth, amenity-rich rural areas have higher levels of initial occupational prestige as compared to their counterparts in other rural areas, but they do not experience higher levels of increase in occupational prestige over the study period. Conclusions. Amenity-driven migration does not appear to increase the socioeconomic status of long-term rural residents. In fact, it is likely that migration has negative impacts on long-term residents with regard to occupational prestige stasis and increased cost-of-living.

http://www.colorado.edu/ibs/pubs/pop/pop2005-0007.pdf

B. "'Taking Care of My Own Blood': Older Women's Relationships to their Households in Agincourt," by Enid J. Schatz (POP2005-08, September 2005, .pdf format, 21p.).

Abstract:

The implications of aging populations, which in the more developed world center around issues of social security health service provision and eldercare, are further complicated in areas of the developing world with high prevalence of HIV/AIDS. Elders are being asked to take on additional financial, emotional and physical responsibilities due to the HIV/AIDS-related illnesses and death of their children. The Agincourt Health and Population Unit field-site, from which this study's ethnographic and survey data come, is situated in the rural north-east of South Africa, in a province with an estimated 33% prevalence of HIV/AIDS. Women in the African context are bearing much of the burden of care related to HIV/AIDS. In this context, I examine the intersection of age and gender, exploring the roles that older women, in particular, are playing in their households, and how those roles are affected by the presence of illness and death of prime-aged adults. Using a mix of quantitative and qualitative data, I show the high percentage of children and adults living in a household with an older woman, and, further, the importance of the caretaking roles older women are taking on in the households in which they live.

http://www.colorado.edu/ibs/pubs/pop/pop2005-0008.pdf

C. "Household Structural and Compositional Change in Agincourt: The Role of HIV/AIDS," by Sangetha Madhaven and Enid J. Schatz (POP2005-09, October 2005, .pdf format, 23p.).

Abstract:

Aim: The Agincourt Health and Demographic Surveillance System (AHDSS) presents a unique opportunity to describe household change over a ten-year period during tremendous social, political, economic and health changes in South Africa. Methods: We examine various indices of household structure and composition at three points between 1992 and 2003 using cross-sections of the AHDSS data set. The three chosen years loosely represent conditions immediately before the elections (92), short term post-elections (97) and longer term (2003) as well as periods of notable increase in HIV prevalence in the site. Results: In this paper, we consider the ways in which household-level change may be related to several significant sociocultural phenomena, in particular, escalating HIV/AIDS. Conclusions: This analysis is an important starting point for future investigations aimed at explaining how HIV/AIDS and other sociocultural changes in the period have impacted on household organization.

http://www.colorado.edu/ibs/pubs/pop/pop2005-0009.pdf

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World Bank Policy Research Programme: "Estimating the returns to education in Argentina: 1992-2002," by Paula Ines Giovagnoli, Ariel Fiszbein, and Harry Anthony Patrinos (WP 3715, September 2005, ASCII text and .pdf format, 48p.).

Abstract:

The authors estimate returns to schooling in urban Argentina for a 10-year period. In addition to comparable earnings functions, they also estimate the returns using quantile regression analysis to detect differences in the returns across the distribution. Over time, men in higher quantiles have higher returns to schooling compared with those in the lower quantiles. For women, returns are highest at the lowest quantile. The returns to education increased during the past decade. The authors do not rule out that increased demand for skills is driving the increasing returns over the decade.

http://www-wds.worldbank.org/servlet/WDS_IBank_Servlet?pcont=details&eid=000016406_20050909141224

Link to full text is at the bottom of the abstract.

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International Monetary Fund: "Sustaining Growth Accelerations and Pro-Poor Growth in Africa," by Catherine A. Pattillo, Sanjeev Gupta, and Kevin Joseph Carey (Working Paper No. 05/195, October 1, 2005, .pdf format, 67p.).

Abstract:

Are improvements in growth in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) since the mid-1990s sustainable? What types of growth strategies contribute the most to reducing poverty? This paper examines these questions in four stages. First, it explores the factors contributing to the post- 1995 improvement in growth. Second, to shed some light on factors associated with substantial jumps in growth rates that are sustained in the medium term, an analysis of the correlates of growth accelerations is presented. Third, the paper examines the consistency of the SSA data with some important predictions from the literature directly linking such areas as fiscal policy, financial development, or institutions and growth. Fourth, it reviews recent evidence regarding lessons on the type of growth process that is most effective at raising the incomes of the poor.

http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/cat/longres.cfm?sk=18536.0

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Luxembourg Income Study: LIS has recently released the following working papers. Links to extensive abstracts and full text are available at:

http://www.lisproject.org/publications/wpapersi.htm

No. 416. "An Atkinson-Gini Family of Social Evaluation Functions: Theory and Illustration using Data from the Luxembourg Income Study," by Abdelkrim Araar and Jean-Yves Duclos, October 2005.

No. 417. Causes and Conditions of Social Vulnerability in Comparative Perspective: Evidence from the LIS Dataset, by Teresa Munzi and Timothy Smeeding, September 2005.

No 418. Poverty and Place in North America, by Mary Jo Bane and Rene Zenteno, April 2005.

No. 419. Poor People in Rich Nations: The United States in Comparative Perspective, by Timothy Smeeding, October 2005.

No. 420. The Tragedy of the Commons or the Curse of Federalism, by Laurent Bouton, Marjorie Gassner, and Vincenzo Verardi, September 2005.

No. 421. Poverty and Inequality: Greece and Mediterranean Europe in Comparative Perspective, by Teresa Munzi and Timothy Smeeding, September 2005.

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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany];

A. "Welfare Reform in European Countries: A Microsimulation Analysis," by Herwig Immervoll, Henrik Jacobsen Kleven, Claus Thustrup Kreiner, and Emmanuel Saez (Discussion Paper 1810, October 2005, .pdf format, 62p.).

Abstract:

This paper estimates the welfare and distributional impact of two types of welfare reform in the 15 (pre-enlargement) member countries of the European Union. The reforms are revenue neutral and financed by an overall and uniform increase in marginal tax rates on earnings. The first reform distributes the additional tax revenue uniformly to everybody (traditional welfare) while the second reform distributes tax proceeds uniformly to workers only (in-work benefit). We build a simple model of labor supply encompassing responses to taxes and transfers along both the intensive and extensive margin. We then use EUROMOD to describe current welfare and tax systems in European Union countries and use calibrated labor supply elasticities along the intensive and extensive margins to analyze the effects of the two welfare reforms. We quantify the equity-efficiency trade-off for a range of elasticity parameters. In most countries, because of large existing welfare programs with high phaseout rates, the uniform redistribution policy is undesirable unless the redistributive tastes of the government are extreme. The in-work benefit reform, on the other hand, is desirable in a very wide set of cases. We discuss the practical policy implications for European welfare policy.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1810.pdf

B. "Does Marriage Make People Happy, Or Do Happy People Get Married? by Alois Stutzer, and Bruno S. Frey (Discussion Paper 1811, October 2005, .pdf format, 35p.).

Abstract:

This paper analyzes the causal relationships between marriage and subjective well-being in a longitudinal data set spanning 17 years. We find evidence that happier singles opt more likely for marriage and that there are large differences in the benefits from marriage between couples. Potential, as well as actual, division of labor seems to contribute to spouses' wellbeing, especially for women and when there is a young family to raise. In contrast, large differences in the partners' educational level have a negative effect on experienced life satisfaction.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1811.pdf

C. "The Obesity Epidemic in Europe," by Anna Sanz-de-Galdeano (Discussion Paper 1814, October 2005, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses longitudinal micro-evidence from the European Community Household Panel to investigate the obesity phenomenon in nine EU countries from 1998 to 2001. The author documents cross-country prevalence, trends and cohort-age profiles of obesity among adults and analyses the socioeconomic factors contributing to the problem. The associated costs of obesity are also investigated, both in terms of health status, health care spending and absenteeism.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1814.pdf

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Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM) [Milano, Italy]:

A. "HIV/AIDS Pandemic in Africa: Trends and Challenges," by Livingston S. Luboobi and Joseph Y.T. Mugisha (WP 103.05, September 2005, .pdf format, 13p.).

Abstract:

Three-quarters of the world's AIDS population lives in Sub-Saharan Africa; most have no access to lifesaving drugs, testing facilities or even basic preventative health care. One of the major factors inhibiting medical professionals in Africa from treating this disease is the inability to access vast areas of the continent with adequately equipped medical facilities. To meet this need, Architecture for Humanity challenged the world's architects and health care professionals to submit designs for a mobile HIV/AIDS health clinic. The pandemic is changing the demographic structure of Africa and wiping out life expectancy gains. Indeed, in many African countries, life expectancy is dropping from more than 60 years to around 45 years or even less. In this paper, we highlight the uniqueness of factors associated with HIV/AIDS pandemic in Africa and present its impact and challenges.

http://www.feem.it/Feem/Pub/Publications/WPapers/WP2005-103.htm

Link to full text is at the bottom of the page.

B. "Migration Dynamics," by Sergio Vergalli and Michele Moretto (WP 108.05, September 2005, .pdf format, 38p.).

Abstract:

This paper tries to explain why most migration flows show some observable jumps in their processes, a phenomenon that seems to be sympathetic with the characteristic of irreversibility of migration. We present a real option model where the choice to migrate depends on both the differential wage between the host country and the country of origin, and on the probability of being fully integrated into the host country. The theoretical results show that the optimal migration decision of a single individual consists of waiting before migrating in a (coordinate) mass of individuals. The dimension of the migration flow depends on the behavioural characteristics of the ethnic groups: the more "sociable" they are, the larger the size of the wave and the lower the differential wage required. A second part of the paper is devoted to calibrating the model and simulating some migration flows to Italy in the last decade. The calibration is able to replicate the observable migration jumps in the short term. In particular, the calibrated model is able to conjecture the induced labour demand elasticity level of the host country and the behavioural rationale of the migrants.

http://www.feem.it/Feem/Pub/Publications/WPapers/WP2005-108.htm

Link to full text is at the bottom of the page.

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King's Fund (London): "Nanny or Steward? The Role of Government in Public Health," by Karen Jochelson (October 2005, .pdf format, 48p.).

Abstract:

In the past year, there has been much debate over the government's role in public health issues such as smoking and obesity. Is government intervention in these areas an example of 'nanny statism'--an unnecessary intrusion into people's lives? Or is it a form of 'stewardship'--part of government's responsibility to protect national health? This paper looks at the options open to governments that want to influence individual and collective behaviour to reduce health risks. It also examines historical and contemporary evidence on the impact of state intervention on public health.

http://www.kingsfund.org.uk/resources/publications/nanny_or.html

More information about King's Fund:

http://www.kingsfund.org.uk/about_us/index.html

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

Other Journals:

American Economic Review (Vol. 95, No. 2, May 2005--Papers and Proceedings). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Dataabase. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

http://www.aeaweb.org/aer/contents/may2005.html

American Journal of Epidemiology (Vol. 162, No. 7, 8, 9 Oct. 1, 15, Nov. 1, 2005).

http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol162/issue7/index.dtl?etoc

http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol162/issue8/index.dtl?etoc

http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol162/issue9/index.dtl?etoc

American Journal of Public Health (Vol. 95, No. 10, October 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.ajph.org/content/vol95/issue10/?etoc

American Sociological Review (Vol. 70, No. 5, October 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/asoca/asr

Journal of Family History (Vol. 30, No. 4, October 2005).

http://jfh.sagepub.com/content/vol30/issue4/

Journal of Health Economics (Vol. 24, No. 6, November 2005).

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/01676296

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees: The UNHCR is looking for applicants for a "Data Analyst, Population & Geographic Data Section" position (Post no. 285013, P-3) . The deadline for application is November 11, 2005. For more information see:

http://www.unhcr.ch/cgi-bin/texis/vtx/admin/opendoc.pdf?tbl=ADMIN&id=434e2a9e2

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LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES:

Senate Indian Affairs Committee Hearing Publication: "Acknowledgment and Apology, on S.J. Res. 15 to Acknowledge a Long History of Official Depredations and Ill-Conceived Policies by the U.S. Government Regarding Indian Tribes and Offer an Apology to All Native Peoples on Behalf of the United States," a hearing held May 25, 2005 (Senate Hearing No. 109-97, ASCII text and .pdf format, 29p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/senate/senate13ch109.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "109-97" (without the quotes).

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House Committee on Energy and Commerce Hearing Publication: "Setting the Path for Reauthorization: Improving Portfolio Management At The NIH," a hearing held Mar. 17, 2005) (House Serial Publication 109-20, ASCII text and .pdf format, 59p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/house05ch109.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "109-20" (without the quotes).

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DATA:

Census Bureau: "Estimated Daytime Population." (October 2005, Microsoft Excel and comma separated value [.csv] format). "he concept of the daytime population refers to the number of people who are present in an area during normal business hours, including workers. This is in contrast to the "resident" population present during the evening and nighttime hours. Information on the expansion or contraction experienced by different communities between nighttime and daytime populations is important for many planning purposes, including those dealing with transportation, disaster, and relief operations."

http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/daytime/daytimepop.html

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International Agency for Research on Cancer/Centre International de Recherche sur le Cancer:

A. GLOBOCAN 2002 (IARC CancerBase No. 5) (September 2005, .zip compressed data extraction system). "The Windows program that presents estimates of the incidence and prevalence of, and mortality from 27 cancers for all countries in the world in 2002 is now available free to download

http://www-dep.iarc.fr/globocan/downloads.htm

B. "Cancer Incidence in Five Continents Volumes I to VIII" (September 2005, .zip compressed data extraction system). "The CD-Rom includes four databases containing data from the eight volumes of Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (CI5). The data are recorded as text files in Comma Separated Value (CSV) format, and can be incorporated easily into statistical packages for further analysis. Two Windows based software programs, with basic tabulation and graphic capabilities, are also provided. The CD-Rom files have been compressed in .Zip format for ease of distribution. CI5 Vol. I to VIII requires about 27 megabytes of disk space for the .Zip file, and about 75 megabytes of disk space for the publication once it's unzipped."

http://www-dep.iarc.fr/CI5_original/downloads.htm

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Center for Research on Child Wellbeing [Princeton University]: "Fragile Families Three-Year Public Use Data." "The third wave of data for the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study are now available.  With the release of these data, researchers will be able to examine changes in children's access to parental (and other) resources up through their third birthday. Also, "In-Home Longitudinal Study of Pre-School Aged Children," The first public use file from the In-Home Longitudinal Study of Pre-School Aged Children, a collaborative study of the Fragile Families' Study, is now available. The In-Home study collects data to ask how parental resources in the form of parental presence or absence, time, and money influence children under the age of five. The In-Home Study collects information on a variety of domains of the child's environment, including: the physical environment (quality of housing, nutrition and food security, health care, adequacy of clothing and supervision) and parenting (parental discipline, parental attachment, and cognitive stimulation). In addition, the Study also collects information on several important child outcomes, including anthropometrics, child behaviors, and cognitive ability. This information has been collected through: interviews with the child's primary caregiver, and direct observation of the child's home environment and the child's interactions with his or her caregiver."

http://opr.princeton.edu/archive/

or

http://www.fragilefamilies.princeton.edu

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National Longitudinal Survey: The Center for Human Resource Research at the Ohio State University has recently released the following NLS data:

A. "National Longitudinal Surveys CD-Rom, All Cohorts, October 2005 (DNLS-10/2005)." Note: This data is available for a fee only on CD-ROM at this time.

B."NLSY97 Event History and Main File Data Rounds 1-7 Release 10/2005 (D97-R7EH)." Note: this data is available for download only at this time (.zip compressed data that must be used with the NLS Web Investigator Software.

C. "NLSY97 CD Geocode Data including Main File and Event History Data Rounds 1-7 10/2005" (D97-Rnd1-7-GEO). Note: This fee based data is only available via CD-ROM and can only be obtained after successfully completed a geocode application and signed a confidentiality agreement with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Links to all data products:

http://www.chrr.ohio-state.edu/nls-info/ordering/display_db.php3

Scroll to or "find in page" your item numbers or titles.

Note: At the top of the page there is a link to the latest, freely available NLS Investigator software (click on "NLS Web Investigator"). There is also a link from the geocode data at the bottom of the page to information on how to complete and application and procure a confidentiality agreement (click on "stats.bls.gov/nls/nlsdata.htm").

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Bureau of Labor Statistics Web Based Data Extractors: BLS has recently enhanced its data with the creation of the following web based data extractors:

A. "Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) Tool." "You can readily retrieve wage and employment statistics by occupation and area using this new tool. For example, you can find out how much registered nurses are paid in different States and different metropolitan areas."

http://data.bls.gov/oes/search.jsp?data_tool=OES

B. "Occupational Injuries and Illnesses Profiles."This new online tool allows you to easily generate tables of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses data by industry, by the demographic characteristics of the worker, and by the characteristics surrounding the incident. These tables can be generated in either HTML or Excel format."

http://data.bls.gov/GQT/servlet/StartProfile?data_tool=Profile

C. "Injury and Illness Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool." " This calculator allows you to compute injury and illness incidence rates for your establishment and to compare your rates with your industry's averages.

http://data.bls.gov/IIRC/?data_tool=IIRC

All three extraction tools are also linked to from:

http://www.bls.gov/bls/features102005.htm

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UK Data Archive (Essex University, Colchester, UK): The UK Data Archive has recently added the following dataset to its holdings. Note: There may be charges or licensing requirements on holdings of the UK Data Archive. For more information see:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/

Young People's Social Attitudes, 2003 (SN 5250)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5250

Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey, 2004 (SN 5227)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5227

Flexible Working Employee Survey, 2003-2004 (SN 5245)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5245

Flexible Working Employee Survey, 2005 (SN 5246)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5246

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-- Jack Solock
Data Librarian--
Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu