Current Demographic Research Report #105, October 17, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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CDERR is compiled and edited by John Carlson, Charlie Fiss, and Jack Solock of the University of Wisconsin Center for Demography and Ecology Information Services Center.

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NOTE!!!: Beginning with this issue, when we find newspaper or periodical articles related to report items, we will pass them along to you. Index items marked with a *** indicate related articles are available. The article(s) will be noted with the item. The article links worked when we sent them, but we cannot guarantee how long they will remain accurate.

In the Oct. 3, 20005 CDERR Report (http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cde/library/cderr/cderr103.htm#otherreports) we noted an article in _Journal of Religion and Society_: "Societal Health with Popular Religiosity and Secularism in the Prosperous Democracies," by Gregory S. Paul. In the Oct. 11, 2005 issue of _Guardian_ [London] there is an article about this article: "My heroes are driven by God, but I'm glad my society isn't," by George Motiot:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/Columnists/Column/0,5673,1589406,00.html

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Index to this issue:

CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

US:

Census Bureau Report: "Indicators of Marriage and Fertility in the United States from the American Community Survey: 2000 to 2003"***

National Institutes of Health News Releases

National Center for Health Statistics Report: "Provisional Report Summary Health Statistics for U. S. Children: National Health Interview Survey, 2004"

Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies Reports:

Government Printing Office Compendium: _US Government Manual: 2005-2006_

National Center for Education Statistics Compendium: _Digest of Education Statistics, 2004_

Federal Bureau of Investigation Compendium: _Crime in the United States: 2004_

Bureau of Justice Statistics Report: "Background Checks for Firearm Transfers, 2004"

US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Report: "Assessing the Nutrient Intakes of Vulnerable Subgroups"

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European Union:

Eurostat Compendium: _Regions: Statistical yearbook 2005: Data 1999-2003_

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Australia:

Australia Institute of Health and Welfare Report: "Diabetes in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Australians"

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Cambodia:

Cambodia National Institute of Statistics: "First Revision Populations for Cambodia 1998-2020"

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Canada:

Canadian Institute for Health Information/Institut canadien d'information sur la sante Report: "Hospital Mental Health Services in Canada 2002-2003"

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Guyana:

Guyana Government Information Agency Report: "Census 2002--Core Analysis"***

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Israel:

Israel Central Bureau of Statistics Report: "Children in Kindergartens and Day-Care Centres 2003/04_

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Latvia:

Central Statistical Bureau of Latvia Press Release: "Demographic profile of men in Latvia"

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Malawi:

Malawi National Statistics Office Reports: "The 2004 Malawi Demographic and Health Survey: Preliminary Report"

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Norway:

Statistics Norway News Release: "More large families at risk of low income"

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Scotland:

General Register Office for Scotland Reports:

A. "Scotland's Census 2001 - Gaelic report"***

B. "Life expectancy for administrative areas within Scotland, 2002-2004"***

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Slovenia:

Statistical Office of Slovenia News Release: "Social cohesion indicators, 1997-2003 - First Release"

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South Korea:

Korea National Statistical Office Statistical Report: "The Cause of Death Statistics in 2004"

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

United Nations Population Fund Compendium: _State of the World Population 2005_***

Urban Institute Brief Report: "The Work Opportunity and Welfare-to-Work Tax Credits"

Population Reference Bureau Article: "The Demographics of the South Asia Earthquake"

Kaiser Family Foundation Issue Brief: "Health Coverage for Individuals Affected by Hurricane Katrina: A Comparison of Different Approaches to Extend Medicaid Coverage"

Springer Books

Info Health Pop. Reporter

WORKING PAPERS

California Center for Population Research (UCLA)
University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty
National Bureau of Economic Research
John F. Kennedy School of Government (Harvard University)
United Nations University, World Institute for Development Economics Research
World Bank Policy Research Programme
National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM)
Center for Economic Studies/Ifo Institute for Economic Research (CESifo)
Institute for Fiscal Studies [London]
Institute for Social and Economic Research (University of Essex, UK)

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta
Other Journals

CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS

National Center for Education Statistics: "Early Childhood Longitudinal Study seminar"

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

Fogarty International Center/National Institutes of Health Directories

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Demographic and Health Surveys--ORC Macro

LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES

DATA

Roper Center [University of Connecticut]: "GSS 1972-2004 Cumulative Data File on CD-ROM"

National Center for Health Statistics: "Interactive Data Tables: Health Data for All Ages"

World Bank Living Standards and Measurement Study: "Timor L'este 2001: Living Standards Survey"

WEBSITES OF INTEREST

Office of Immigration Statistics: "Mapping Immigration: Legal Permanent Residents (LPRs)"

kaiserEdu.org Updates

Economic and Social Data Service Thematic Guides

BIBLIOGRAPHY UPDATES

National Longitudinal Surveys

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

US:

1. Census Bureau Report: "Indicators of Marriage and Fertility in the United States from the American Community Survey: 2000 to 2003," by Tallese Johnson and Jane Dye (May 2005, Excel, comma separated value [.csv], and Microsoft PowerPoint format). The report is linked to from a Census Bureau news release: "New Analysis Offers First-Ever State-by-State Look at Links Between Marriage, Fertility and Other Socioeconomic Characteristics" (CB05-AC.55, Oct. 13, 2005).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/fertility/005807.html

Click on title of report for link to report.

Related article: "Data on Marriage and Births Reflect the Political Divide," by Tamar Lewin (_New York Times_, Oct. 13, 2005). Note: _NYT_ requires free registration before providing articles. http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/13/national/13census.html?incamp=article_popular_5

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2. National Institutes of Health News Releases

A. "U.S. Kidney Failure Rates Stabilize, Ending a 20-Year Climb," (October 11, 2005).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/oct2005/niddk-11.htm

B. "NIAID Launches First Phase II Trial of a "Global" HIV/AIDS Vaccine," (October 11, 2005).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/oct2005/niaid-11.htm

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3. National Center for Health Statistics Report: "Provisional Report Summary Health Statistics for U. S. Children: National Health Interview Survey, 2004," (Vital and Health Statistics Series 10, No. 227, October 2005, .pdf format, 159p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_10/sr10_227.pdf

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4. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies:

A. "Women in Substance Abuse Treatment:Results from the Alcohol and Drug Services Study (ADSS)," by Thomas M. Brady and Olivia Silber Ashley (September 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 104p.).

http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/womenTX/womenTX.htm

B. "Male Admissions with Co-Occurring Psychiatric and Substance Use Problems, 2003," (Drug and Alcohol Services Information System (DASIS) report, October 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k5/menDualTX/menDualTX.cfm

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5. Government Printing Office Compendium: _US Government Manual: 2005-2006_ (October 2005, ASCII text and .pdf format, 693p.) "As the official handbook of the Federal Government, the United States Government Manual provides comprehensive information on the agencies of the legislative, judicial, and executive branches. It also includes information on quasi-official agencies; international organizations in which the United States participates; and boards, commissions, and committees." The _Manual_ is browsable and searchable.

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gmanual/index.html

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6. National Center for Education Statistics Compendium: _Digest of Education Statistics, 2004_ (October 2005, HTML format, with tables in ASCII text and Microsoft Excel format).

Abstract:

The Digest of Education Statistics provides a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. Topics in the Digest include: the number of schools and colleges; teachers; enrollments; graduates; educational attainment; finances; federal funds for education; employment and income of graduates; libraries; technology; and international comparisons.

http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d04/

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7. Federal Bureau of Investigation Compendium: _Crime in the United States: 2004_ (October 2005, HTML and.pdf format 523p., with tables in Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/cius_04/

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8. Bureau of Justice Statistics Report: "Background Checks for Firearm Transfers, 2004," by Michael Bowling, Gene Lauver, Matthew J. Hickman, and Devon B. Adams (NCJ 210117, October 2005, ASCII text and .pdf format, 12p., with .zip compressed spreadsheets).

Abstract:

Describes background checks for firearm transfers conducted in 2004. This annual report provides the number of applications checked by State points of contact, estimates of the number of applications checked by local agencies, the number of applications rejected, the reasons for rejection, and estimates of applications and rejections conducted by each type of approval system. It also provides information about appeals of rejected applications and arrests for falsified applications. The Firearm Inquiry Statistics Program, managed under the National Criminal History Improvement Program, is an ongoing data collection effort focusing on the procedures and statistics related to presale firearms background checks in selected States.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/bcft04.htm

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9. US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Report: " Assessing the Nutrient Intakes of Vulnerable Subgroups," by Barbara Devaney, Myoung Kim, Alicia Carriquiry, and Gabriel Camano-Garcia (Contractor and Cooperator Report No. CCR11, October 2005, .pdf format, 98p.).

Abstract:

This study is a comprehensive analysis of the nutrient adequacy of segments of the population at risk of inadequate nutrient intake, excessive intake, or dietary imbalances, based on the Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals conducted in 1994-96 and 1998. The segments include adolescent females, older adults, children and adults at risk of overweight, individuals living in food-insufficient households, low-income individuals, and individuals targeted by and participating in food and nutrition assistance programs. The study adds to a growing literature that uses current, improved knowledge of nutrient requirements and recommended nutrient assessment methods to analyze nutrient intakes. The study indicates generally inadequate intakes of key micronutrients, especially magnesium, calcium, folate, and vitamin E; energy intakes less than recommended energy requirements for adults; and consumption of too much food energy from fat and not enough from carbohydrates; and inadequate intakes of fiber. In addition, diet adequacy deteriorates as individuals get older. Children~Wespecially infants and young children-have diets that are more nutritionally adequate than those of adolescents and adults.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/CCR11/

Link to full text is at the bottom of the abstract.

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European Union:

Eurostat Compendium: _Regions: Statistical yearbook 2005: Data 1999-2003_ (2005, .pdf format, 151p.). "The 2005 edition of Regions: Statistical yearbook covers the 254 regions of the 25 EU Member States, defined by level 2 of the Nomenclature of territorial units for statistics (NUTS 2003), and the 14 statistical regions in the candidate countries Bulgaria and Romania. This year, the publication includes chapters on population, agriculture, GDP, household accounts, labour market, transport, science, technology and innovation, business, health, urban statistics, education and tourism. Efforts have been made to focus on aspects not recently covered. The regional diversity of Europe is shown in the form of maps, graphs and text. A CD-ROM contains the data series used to draw the maps, the PDF versions of each of the three language editions of the yearbook and documentation on the NUTS 2003 nomenclature." Ordering information for a print copy and CD-ROM is available at the site.

http://epp.eurostat.cec.eu.int/portal/page?_pageid=1073,46587259&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL&p_product_code=KS-AF-05-001

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Australia:

Australia Institute of Health and Welfare Report: "Diabetes in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Australians," by Anne Marie Thow and Anne-Marie Waters (October 2005, .pdf format, 60p.).

Abstract:

The purpose of this report is to identify those groups of people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds that have a high prevalence or risk of diabetes compared with the Australian-born population. The report describes the demographics of these groups in relation to the size of the community, their proficiency in English, and location within Australia. The report also identifies gaps in the available literature and data.

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10188

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Cambodia:

Cambodia National Institute of Statistics: "First Revision Populations for Cambodia 1998-2020" (2005). Projections by age and sex are available at the national and provincial levels.

http://www.nis.gov.kh/projcam/Index_Proj.htm

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Canada:

Canadian Institute for Health Information/Institut canadien d'information sur la sante Report: "Hospital Mental Health Services in Canada 2002-2003." Note: CIHI/ICIS requires free registration before providing content. The report is linked to from a CIHI/ICIS news release: "One in Seven Hospitalizations in Canada Involve Patients Diagnosed With Mental Illness," (October 12, 2005).

http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/dispPage.jsp?cw_page=media_12oct2005_e

Click on "Report" and then title.

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Guyana:

Guyana Government Information Agency Report: "Census 2002--Core Analysis" (October 2005, .pdf format, 71p.).

http://www.gina.gov.gy/census/summarycensus.pdf

Regional Maps:

http://media.maps.com/magellan/Images/GUYANA-W2.gif

http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amsudant/Guyana-carte.htm

Related Articles:

A. "Emigration has had 'heavy influence' -census -40% of those born near 1980 no longer here" (_Stabroek News [Georgetown], Oct. 13, 2005). http://www.stabroeknews.com/index.pl/article?id=32734990

B. "Mixed race, Amerindians in population up -Indo-Guyanese down by 5%" (_Stabroek News_ [Georgetown, Oct. 13, 2005). http://www.stabroeknews.com/index.pl/article?id=32734991

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Israel:

Israel Central Bureau of Statistics Report: "Children in Kindergartens and Day-Care Centres 2003/04_" (July 2005, .pdf and Microsoft Excel formats 38p., with selected information also available in Microsoft Word format).

http://www.cbs.gov.il/publications/children04/children04_e.htm

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Latvia:

Central Statistical Bureau of Latvia Press Release: "Demographic profile of men in Latvia" (Oct. 14, 2005).

http://www.csb.lv/ateksts.cfm?tem_kods=dem&datums=%7Bts%20%272005%2D10%2D14%2013%3A00%3A00%27%7D

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Malawi:

Malawi National Statistics Office Reports: "The 2004 Malawi Demographic and Health Survey: Preliminary Report" (MNSO and MEASURE DHS/ORC Macro, June 2005, .pdf format, 29p. Also included is a DHS Special Stats Flash (2005, .pdf format, 2p.).

http://www.nso.malawi.net/data_on_line/demography/dhs2004/dhs2004.html

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Norway:

Statistics Norway News Release: "More large families at risk of low income" (Oct. 14, 2005). Note: 17 tables are included with the news release.

http://www.ssb.no/inntind_en/main.html

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Scotland:

General Register Office for Scotland Reports:

A. "Scotland's Census 2001 - Gaelic report" (October 2005, .pdf format, 26p., with tables in Lotus 1-2-3 and Microsoft Excel format). The report is linked to from a GROS news release: "Scotland's Census 2001 - Gaelic Report" (Oct. 10, 2005).

http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/press/news2005/scotlands-census-2001-gaelic-report.html

Click on title for link to full text.

Related article: "Gaelic is on the move says census analysis," by David Ross (_Herald_ [Glasgow], Oct. 10, 2005). http://www.theherald.co.uk/news/48598.html

B. "Life expectancy for administrative areas within Scotland, 2002-2004" (October 2005, .pdf format, 23p., with tables in Lotus 1-2-3, Microsoft Excel and .pdf format).

http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/statistics/library/life-expectancy/le2002-04.html

Related article: "Life expectancy gap is widening," by Martyn McLaughlin (_Herald_ [Glasgow], Oct. 7, 2005). http://www.theherald.co.uk/news/48425.html

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Slovenia:

Statistical Office of Slovenia News Release: "Social cohesion indicators, 1997-2003 - First Release" (Oct. 14, 2005, HTML with detailed attachment in Microsoft Word format).

http://www.stat.si/eng/novice_poglej.asp?ID=770

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South Korea:

Korea National Statistical Office Statistical Report: "The Cause of Death Statistics in 2004" (Oct. 12, 2005).

http://www.nso.go.kr/eng/releases/report_view.html?num=469

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

United Nations Population Fund Compendium: _State of the World Population 2005_ (October 2005, HTML and .pdf format 119p.). This year's theme is " The Promise of Equality: Gender Equity, Reproductive Health, and the MDGs".

http://www.unfpa.org/swp/swpmain.htm

Related article: "Ethiopia: Domestic violence rampant, says UNFPA" (Reuters, Oct. 12, 2005). http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/IRIN/1e1390951c7a75f53c70f42c82cb9e32.htm

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Urban Institute Brief Report: "The Work Opportunity and Welfare-to-Work Tax Credits," by Sarah Hamersma (Tax Policies Issues and Options Brief No. 15, October 7, 2005, .pdf format, 8p.).

Abstract:

Over the past ten years, public assistance programs have encouraged labor force participation as a route to self-sufficiency. The 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA, or " welfare reform") and significant expansions in the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) created the largest and most studied changes in the work incentives of the poor. However, some smaller programs that may also affect employment among the poor have been largely ignored in the policy discussion. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC), introduced in 1996, offers generous subsidies to firms that hire disadvantaged workers, including certain welfare recipients, food stamp recipients, people with disabilities, and others. The similar Welfare-to-Work (WtW) tax credit, implemented in 1998, offers firms potentially larger subsidies for hiring long-term welfare recipients. Although these programs are much smaller than cash assistance or the EITC, the tax credits totaled nearly $500 million in fiscal year 2003 according to the Office of Management and Budget (2005). The policy goal of the WOTC and WtW is to improve job prospects for individuals who face barriers to employment or are in hard-to-employ groups. While workers may respond to direct subsidies like the EITC by seeking a job, there is concern that employers may still be unwilling to hire some of these workers due to their lack of experience or qualifications. The WOTC and WtW are designed to provide incentives for employers to hire such workers. This brief provides some policy background on employer subsidies, discusses participation in the WOTC and WtW, surveys the current evidence on the effects of the tax credits on labor market outcomes, and discusses the costs and benefits of the programs. The evidence suggests that the programs are vastly underutilized and have not had a meaningful effect on employment rates among the disadvantaged. However, those relatively few workers whose employers participate do appear to experience a modest earnings increase as a result of the subsidies.

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311233

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Population Refernce Bureau Article: "The Demographics of the South Asia Earthquake," by Sandra Yin and Robert Lalasz (October, 2005).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/05_Articles/The_Demographics_of_the_South_Asia_Earthquake.htm

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Kaiser Family Foundation Issue Brief: "Health Coverage for Individuals Affected by Hurricane Katrina: A Comparison of Different Approaches to Extend Medicaid Coverage" (Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, October 2005, .pdf format, 6p.)."

Approaches have been put forward to extend Medicaid coverage to Hurricane Katrina survivors, but they differ significantly regarding the extent to which they extend Medicaid eligibility and in the role of federal funding for coverage of Hurricane survivors. This publication provides an overview of these approaches and their key differences. First is a table comparing the major components of the September 15, 2005 Senate bill, the Administration'ss waiver initiative, and the Texas waiver. Second is a fact sheet that provides greater detail on the Texas waiver and highlights some key questions raised by the waiver."

http://www.kff.org/medicaid/7417.cfm

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Springer Books: _Fragile Families and the Marriage Agenda_, edited by Lori Kowaleski-Jones and Nicholas Wolfinger (2005, 240p., ISBN-0-387-25884-1).

For more information see:

http://www.springeronline.com/sgw/cda/frontpage/0,0,4-0-22-50234013-0,0.html

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Info Health Pop. Reporter: info Health Pop. Reporter: Info Health Pop. Reporter: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (vol. 5, no. 42, Oct. 16, 2005). "The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

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WORKING PAPERS:

California Center for Population Research (UCLA):

A. "Forecasting Dangerous Inmate Misconduct: An Applications of Ensemble Statistical Procedures," by Richard A. Berk, Brian Kreigler, and Jong-Ho Baek (CCPR-029-05, May 2005, .pdf format, p.).

Abstract:

In this paper, we attempt to forecast which prison inmates are likely to engage in very serious misconduct while incarcerated. Such misconduct would usually be a major felony if committed outside of prison: drug tracking, assault, rape, attempted murder and other crimes. The binary response variable is problematic because it is highly unbalanced. Using data from nearly 10,000 inmates held in facilities operated by the California Department of Corrections, we show that several popular classification procedures do no better than the marginal distribution unless the data are weighted in a fashion that compensates for the lack of balance. Then, random forests performs reasonably well, and better than CART or logistic regression. Although less than 3% of the inmates studied over 24 months were reported for very serious misconduct, we are able to correctly forecast such behavior about half the time.

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/ccpr_029_05.asp

Click on "Full Text" at the bottom of the abstract for link to full text.

B. "The Legacy of Apartheid: Racial Inequalities in the New South Africa," by Donald J. Treiman (CCPR-032-05, October 2005, .pdf format, 48p.).

Abstract:

The legacy of 350 years of apartheid practice and 50 years of concerted apartheid policy has been to create racial differences in socioeconomic position larger than in any other nation in the world. Whites, who constitute 11 percent of the population, enjoy levels of education, occupational status, and income similar to and in many respects superior to those of the industrially-developed nations of Europe and the British diaspora. Within the White population, however, there is a sharp distinction between the one-third of English origin and the two-thirds of Afrikaner origin. Despite apartheid policies explicitly designed to improve the lot of Afrikaners at the expense of non-Whites, the historical difference between the two groups continues to be seen in socioeconomic differences at the end of the 20th century. Still, the disadvantages of Afrikaners are modest compared to those of non-Whites, particularly Coloureds and Blacks, who bear the brunt of apartheid policies. Ethnic penalties are especially large for people with lower levels of education. For those with less than a tertiary education, there appears to be an occupational floor under Whites and an occupational ceiling over non-Whites. For the small minority of Blacks and Coloureds with tertiary education, the likelihood of being employed and the kinds of jobs available differ relatively little from the opportunities of Asians and White; but for the vast majority lacking tertiary education the ethnic penalty is very large, particularly for Blacks. Most are unable even to find work, with about 40 percent of Black men and more than half of Black women unemployed; and those who are employed are relegated largely to semi- and unskilled jobs. Although tertiary education minimizes racial differences in occupational opportunities, it has little effect on racial differences in income, which are large even among the well educated and even among those working in similar occupations.

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/ccprwpseries/ccpr_032_05.pdf

C. "Trends in Educational Assortative Mating in Post-Socialist Central Europe: Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, and Hungary between 1988 and 2000," by Tomas Katrnak, Martin Kreidl, and Laura Fonadova (CCPR-033-05, October 2005, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

This article analyzes trends in educational homogamy in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland and Hungary from 1988 to 2000. Our initial hypothesis is that educational homogamy strengthened in post-socialist countries as a result of changing socio-economic conditions during the post-communist transformation. We argue that people?s behavior changes in reaction to a new socio-economic environment where risks associated with a poor marital match are more pronounced. We analyze key statistical data on all new marriages in the years 1988, 1991, 1994, 1997 and 2000 in each country. Log-linear and log-multiplicative models led to the rejection of our initial hypothesis. Between 1988 and 2000 educational homogamy remained low and constant in the Czech Republic and high and constant in Poland, whereas it increased slightly in Hungary and rather significantly in Slovakia. The article concludes with a discussion of some possible explanations of these varied trends in educational homogamy with regards to changes in demographic as well as social mobility processes in former socialist countries during the 1990s.

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/ccpr_033_05.asp

Click on "Full Text" at the bottom of the abstract for link to full text.

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University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty: "A Critical Review of Rural Poverty Literature: Is There Truly a Rural Effect," by Bruce Weber, Leif Jensen, Kathleen Miller, Jane Mosley, and Monica Fisher (DP 1309-05, October 2005, .pdf format, 47p.).

Abstract:

Poverty rates are highest in the most urban and most rural areas of the United States, and are higher in nonmetropolitan than metropolitan areas. Yet, perhaps because only one-fifth of the nation'ss 35 million poor people live in nonmetropolitan areas, rural poverty has received less attention than urban poverty from both policymakers and researchers. We provide a critical review of literature that examines the factors affecting poverty in rural areas. We focus on studies that explore whether there is a rural effect, i.e., whether there is something about rural places above and beyond demographic characteristics and local economic context that makes poverty more likely in those places. We identify methodological concerns (such as endogenous membership and omitted variables) that may limit the validity of conclusions from existing studies that there is a rural effect. We conclude with suggestions for research that would address these concerns and explore the processes and institutions in urban and rural areas that determine poverty, outcomes, and policy impacts.

http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp130905.pdf

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National Bureau of Economic Research: "Poverty in America: Trends and Explanations," by Hilary Hoynes, Marianne Page, Ann Stevens (w11681, October 2005, .pdf format, 52p.).

Abstract:

Despite robust growth in real per capita GDP over the last three decades, the U.S. poverty rate has changed very little. In an effort to better understand this disconnect, we document and quantify the relationship between poverty and four different factors that may affect poverty and its evolution over time: labor market opportunities, family structure, anti-poverty programs, and immigration. We find that the relationship between the macro-economy and poverty has weakened over time. Nevertheless, changes in labor market opportunities predict changes in the poverty rate rather well. We also find that changes in female labor supply should have reduced poverty, but was counteracted by an increase in the rate of female headship. Changes in the number and composition of immigrants and changes in the generosity of anti-poverty programs seem to have had little effect.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11681

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Population Aging Research Center (University of Pennsylvania):

A. "Commitment, Risk, and Consumption: Do Birds of a Feather Have Bigger Nests?," by Stephen H.Shore and Todd Sinai (PARC Working Paper Series WPS 05-01, August 3, 2005, .pdf format, 58p.).

Abstract:

We show that incorporating consumption commitments into a standard model of precautionary saving can complicate the usual relationship between risk and consumption. In particular, the presence of plausible adjustment costs can cause a mean-preserving increase in unemployment risk to lead to increased consumption. The predictions of this model are consistent with empirical evidence from dual-earning couples. Couples who share an occu- pation face increased risk as their unemployment shocks are more highly correlated. Such couples spend more on owner-occupied housing than other couples, spend no more on rent, and are more likely to rent than own. This pattern is strongest when the household faces higher moving costs, or when unemployment insurance provides a less generous safety net.

http://www.pop.upenn.edu/rc/parc/aging_center/2005/PARCwps05-01.pdf

B. "Do Children Learn to Save from Their Parents?," by John Knowles and Andrew Postlewaite (PARC Working Paper Series WPS 05-06, June 2005, .pdf format, 51p.).

Abstract:

It is well-known that small differences in discount rates, persisting over generations, make it much easier to explain US wealth inequality across households as an equilibrium outcome. At the individual level, recent micro studies suggest that variations in preferences or in planning behavior are plausible candidates to explain inequality in pre-retirement savings among households in similar circumstances. In this paper, we argue that if such differences in behavior are really a function of an agent's basic personality, then we would expect parents and children to share such traits, and so parental savings behavior should predict both savings and other investment decisions of the children such as education. We formalize this argument using a simple life-cycle model and estimate family savings effects on household data in the PSID. In our model such family effects can be interpreted as arising from either patience or self control. We find that family effects are significant both statistically and economically; parental savings behavior explains both education and savings choices of childrens' households. We also find that these effects are linked to self reports about attitudes toward planning for the future, but not to reported willingness to defer consumption.

http://www.pop.upenn.edu/rc/parc/aging_center/2005/PARCwps05-06.pdf

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John F. Kennedy School of Government (Harvard University):

A. "Inequality," by Edward L. Glaeser (Working Paper Number RWP05-056, October 13, 2005, .pdf format, 24p.).

Abstract:

This paper reviews five striking facts about inequality across countries. As Kuznets (1955) famously first documented, inequality first rises and then falls with income. More unequal societies are much less likely to have democracies or governments that respect property rights. Unequal societies have less redistribution, and we have little idea whether this relationship is caused by redistribution reducing inequality or inequality reducing redistribution. Inequality and ethnic heterogeneity are highly correlated, either because of differences in educational heritages across ethnicities or because ethnic heterogeneity reduces redistribution. Finally, there is much more inequality and less redistribution in the U.S. than in most other developed nations.

http://ksgnotes1.harvard.edu/Research/wpaper.nsf/rwp/RWP05-056

B. "Divergence of Human Capital Levels across Cities," by Christopher R. Berry and Edward L. Glaeser (Working Paper Number RWP05-057, October 13, 2005, .pdf format, 52p.).

Abstract:

Over the past 30 years, the share of adult populations with college degrees increased more in cities with higher initial schooling levels than in initially less educated places. This tendency appears to be driven by shifts in labor demand as there is an increasing wage premium for skilled people working in skilled cities. In this paper, we present a model where the clustering of skilled people in metropolitan areas is driven by the tendency of skilled entrepreneurs to innovate in ways that employ other skilled people and by the elasticity of housing supply.

http://ksgnotes1.harvard.edu/Research/wpaper.nsf/rwp/RWP05-057

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United Nations University, World Institute for Development Economics Research: "Why Do Poverty Rates Differ From Region to Region? The Case of Urban China," by Yin Zhang and Guanghua Wan (WIDER Research Paper No. 2005/56, August 2005, .pdf format, 16p.).

Abstract:

This paper proposes a semi-parametric method for poverty decomposition, which combines the data-generating procedure of Shorrocks and Wan (2004) with the Shapley value framework of Shorrocks (1999). Compared with the popular method of Datt and Ravallion (1992), our method is more robust to misspecification errors, does not require the predetermination of functional forms, provides better fit to the underlying Lorenz curve and incorporates the residual term in a rigorous way. The method is applied to decomposing variations of urban poverty across the Chinese provinces into three components--contributions by the differences in average nominal income, inequality and poverty line. The results foreground average income as the key determinant of poverty incidence, but also attach importance to the influence of distribution. The regional pattern of the decomposition suggests provincial groupings based not entirely on geographical locations.

http://www.wider.unu.edu/publications/rps/rps2005/rp2005-56.pdf

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World Bank Policy Research Programme: "Half a world: regional inequality in five great federations," by Branco Milanovic (WPS 3699, September 2005, ASCII text and .pdf format, 52p.).

Abstract:

The paper studies regional (spatial) inequality in the five most populous countries in the world: China, India, the United States, Indonesia, and Brazil in the period 1980-2000. They are all federations or quasi-federations composed of entities with substantial economic autonomy. Two types of regional inequalities are considered: Concept 1 inequality, which is inequality between mean incomes (GDP per capita) of states/provinces, and Concept 2 inequality, which is inequality between population-weighted regional mean incomes. The first inequality speaks to the issue of regional convergence, the second, to the issue of overall inequality as perceived by citizens within a nation. All three Asian countries show rising inequality in terms of both concepts in the 1990s. Divergence in income outcomes is particularly noticeable for the most populous states/provinces in China and India. The United States, where regional inequality is the least, shows further convergence. Brazil, with the highest level of regional inequality, displays no trend. A regression analysis fails to establish robust association between the usual macroeconomic variables and the two types of regional inequality.

http://econ.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64165259&theSitePK=469382&piPK=64165421&menuPK=64166093&entityID=000016406_20050830161631

Links to full text are at the bottom of the abstract

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National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM) [University of Canberra, Australia]: "Persistence of problems with child care: evidence from the HILDA survey," by Justine McNamara, Rebecca Cassells and Rachel Lloyd (Online Conference Paper - CP0515, September 2005, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract:

Substantial research has been conducted into the impact of accessible, affordable and high quality childcare on outcomes such as maternal workforce participation and child well-being. Relatively little is known, however, about the extent to which Australian parents experience problems in accessing appropriate care for their children, or the family characteristics most often associated with problems accessing care. In this study we examine the characteristics of those households that have experienced persistent problems with accessing childcare by using data from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics of Australia (HILDA) survey. The study involves a longitudinal analysis of self-reported problems with child care affordability and availability, using Waves 2 and 3 of the HILDA survey. The longitudinal analysis looks at mothers in households that experienced persistent problems with child care and the relationships between persistent problems and household characteristics such as income, type of child care usage, household type and ages of children. We also examine the effects of problems with child care in Wave 2 on child care use and hours of maternal work in Wave 3.

http://www.natsem.canberra.edu.au/publication.jsp?titleID=CP0515

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Center for Economic Studies/Ifo Institute for Economic Research (CESifo) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

"Demographic Change and Public Education Spending: A Conflict between Young and Old?," by Ueli Grob and Stefan C. Wolter (Working Paper No. 1555, October 2005, .pdf format, 26p.).

Abstract:

Demographic change in industrial countries will influence educational spending in potentially two ways. On the one hand, the decline in the number of school-age children should alleviate the financial pressure. On the other hand, the theoretical/empirical literature has established that the concomitantly increasing proportion of elderly in the population can influence the propensity of politicians to spend on education. Using a panel of the Swiss Cantons for the period from 1990 to 2002, we find that the education system has exhibited little elasticity in adjusting to changes in the school-age population, and that the share of the elderly population has a significantly negative influence on the willingness to spend on public education.

http://www.cesifo.de/portal/page?_pageid=36,302752&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL&p_file_id=11856

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Institute for Fiscal Studies [London]: "Job changes, hours changes and the path of labour supply adjustment," by Richard Blundell, Mike Brewer, and Marco Francesconi (IFS Working Papers, W05/21, October 2005, .pdf format, p. 35).

Abstract:

This paper uses the first twelve waves of the British Household Panel Survey covering the period 1991-2002 to investigate single women'ss labour supply changes in response to three tax and benefit policy reforms that occurred in the 1990s. We find evidence of small labour supply effects for two of such reforms. A third reform in 1999 instead led to a significant increase in single mothers's hours of work. This increase was primarily driven by women who changed job, suggesting that labour supply adjustments within a job are harder than across jobs. The presence of hours inflexibility within jobs and labour supply adjustments through job mobility are strongly confirmed when we look at hours changes by stated labour supply preferences. Finally, we find little overall effect on wages.

http://www.ifs.org.uk/publications.php?publication_id=3452

Link to full text is at the bottom of the abstract

More information about IFS:

http://www.ifs.org.uk/aboutindex.php

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Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex [Colchester, UK]: "O Brother, Where Art Thou? The Effects of Having a Sibling on Geographic Mobility and Labor Market Outcomes," by Helmut Rainer and Thomas Siedler (September 6, 2005, .pdf format, 43p.).

Abstract:

In most industrialized countries, more people than ever are having to cope with the burden of caring for elderly parents. This paper formulates a model to explain how parental care responsibilities and family structure interact in affecting children'ss mobility characteristics. A key insight we obtain is that the mobility of young adults crucially depends on the presence of a sibling. Our explanation is mainly, but not exclusively, based on a sibling power effect. Siblings compete in location and employment decisions so as to direct parental care decisions at later stages towards their preferred outcome. Only children are not exposed to this kind of competition. This causes an equilibrium in which siblings not only exhibit higher mobility than only children, but also have better labor market outcomes. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) and from the American National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH), we find strong evidence that confirms these patterns. The implications of our results are then discussed in the context of current population trends in Europe and the United States.

http://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/pubs/workpaps/pdf/2005-18.pdf

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "advanced search" C. Type in your publication name and click "Exact title" radio button D. Under "Show", click the "fax/ariel" radio button. E. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

Social Science Journal (Vol. 42, No. 3, 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

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Other Journals:

AIDS (Vol. 19, No. 16, Nov. 4, 2005).

http://www.aidsonline.com/pt/re/aids/issuelist.htm

Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences (Vol. 27, No. 4, November 2005).

http://hjb.sagepub.com/content/vol27/issue4/

Journal of Marriage and the Family (Vol. 67, No. 4, November 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/jomf

Population Research and Policy Review (Vol. 24, No. 4, August 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=102983

Public Health Reports (Vol. 120, No. 6, November/December 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.publichealthreports.org/main.cfm

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CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS:

National Center for Education Statistics: "Early Childhood Longitudinal Study seminar," to be held in Washington D.C., Jan. 11-13, 2006). "The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, will sponsor a 3-day advanced studies seminar on the use of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) database. ECLS-B is designed to support research on a wide range of topics pertaining to young children'ss cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development and their health status across multiple contexts (e.g., home and child care). This seminar is open to advanced graduate students and faculty members from colleges and universities nationwide and to researchers, education practitioners, and policy analysts from federal, state, and local education and human services agencies and professional associations." For more information see:

http://nces.ed.gov/conferences/confinfo.asp?confid=78

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FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

Fogarty International Center/National Institutes of Health Directories:

A. Directory of International Grants and Fellowships in the Health Sciences: Grant Opportunities

http://www.fic.nih.gov/news/DirectoryGrants.html

B. Directory of International Grants and Fellowships in the Health Sciences: Fellowship Opportunities

http://www.fic.nih.gov/news/DirectoryFellowships.html

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

Demographic and Health Surveys--ORC Macro: "The Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) program at ORC Macro is offering three additional fellowships for a period of two years. We are seeking two fellows to work principally in the areas of demography, population, fertility and family planning. We are also seeking one fellow to work in the area if HIV/AIDS. The fellowship program is financed by USAID and its main goals are to provide further training for developing country researchers and to contribute to the further analysis of DHS data". Applications are due by November 15, 2005. For more information see:

http://www.measuredhs.com/aboutdhs/opening.cfm

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DATA:

Roper Center [University of Connecticut]: "GSS 1972-2004 Cumulative Data File on CD-ROM," The 1972-2004 GSS cumulative data file for the National Opinion Research Center's General Social Surveys (GSS) is now available from the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research on CD-ROM. For more information, including pricing information see:

http://www.ropercenter.uconn.edu/gss.html

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National Center for Health Statistics: "Interactive Data Tables: Health Data for All Ages" (October 2005. Beyond 20/20 software extraction system, with instructions in .pdf format, 2p.). "The tables present pre-tabulated data by age, gender, race/ethnicity and geographic area, and are organized in folders by life stages and topics: Infants, Children, and Adolescents; Adults and Older Adults; State Data; and, Asthma Data on Demand."

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/health_data_for_all_ages.htm

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Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Education Longitudinal Study (ELS), 2002: Base Year (#4275)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04275.xml

Monitoring of Federal Criminal Sentences, 2003 (#4290)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04290.xml

Great Plains Population and Environment Data: Social and Demographic Data, 1870-2000 [United States] (#4296)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04296.xml

Recent updates and additions at ICPSR:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/access/recent.html

Click on "list" for link to updates and additions. New items are marked *new*.

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World Bank Living Standards and Measurement Study: "Timor L'este 2001: Living Standards Survey" (October 2005, data in ASCII, Stata, and SAS formats, with documentation in .pdf and PostScript formats). Note: A data agreement must be signed before the data can be accessed.

http://www.worldbank.org/lsms/country/tl2001/tlhome.html

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WEBSITES OF INTEREST:

Office of Immigration Statistics: "Mapping Immigration: Legal Permanent Residents (LPRs): OIS has recently added this section to its website, which contains "maps (.pdf format) showing LPR flow by state for the years 1980 to 1989, 1990 to 1999, 2000 to 2003, and 2003. Three sets of maps are presented: 1) total LPR flow, 2) class of admission, and 3) region and country of birth. Each map shows the LPR flow by state as a percent of the total LPR flow."

http://uscis.gov/graphics/shared/statistics/data/maps/lprmaps.htm

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kaiserEdu.org Updates: kaiserEDU.org, originally discussed in the CDERR issue No. 26 (Apr. 5, 2004--http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cde/library/cderr/cderr26.htm#websites) has recently added the following content to its site:

A. Under Health Systems: Medical Malpractice Policy, Issue Module

B. Under Medicaid/SCHIP: The Basics, Tutorial

C. Under Prescription Drugs: Prescription Drug Costs, Issue Module

D. Minority Health: Race, Ethnicity, and Health Care: The Basics Reference Library

All of the above can be accessed from:

http://www.kaiseredu.org/

Click on topics and then titles. Note that Tutorials may require your computer to have audio-video capability and/or Microsoft PowerPoint capability.

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Economic and Social Data Service Thematic Guides: ESDS provides several guides to using data produced by government agencies and by surveys in the UK. Guides are available in .pdf and Microsoft Word format. The latest guide is "Social capital: introductory user guide".

http://www.esds.ac.uk/government/resources/themeguides.asp

More information on ESDS:

http://www.esds.ac.uk/government/about/

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BIBLIOGRAPHY UPDATES

National Longitudinal Surveys: Note: These citations, along with all of the NLS bibliography, can be found at:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/

Note: Where available, direct links to full text have been provided. These references represent updated citations from Oct. 10 - Oct. 14, 2005.

For more information on any of these citations (selected abstracts are available) go to the above listed address and click on "Title List". Click on the first item, which will give the syntax of the citation urls:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/qtitle.php3?myrow[0]=320

Then change the number after the equal sign (320 in this case) to the number listed as the "ID Number" in the citations below. You will be taken to the full citation listing.

HOTZ, V. JOSEPH MCELROY, SUSAN WILLIAMS SANDERS, SETH G. Teenage Childbearing and Its Life Cycle Consequences
The Journal of Human Resources 40,3 (Summer 2005): 683-715. Also: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/wisc/jhr/2005/00000040/00000003/art00007 Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 5113
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press

TOMASKOVIC-DEVEY, DONALD THOMAS, MELVIN JOHNSON, KECIA RENEE
Race and the Accumulation of Human Capital across the Career: A Theoretical Model and Fixed-Effects Application
American Journal of Sociology 111,1 (July 2005): 58-89. Also: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJS/journal/issues/v111n1/080186/080186.html Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 5114
Publisher: University of Chicago Press

KORENMAN, SANDERS D. KAESTNER, ROBERT
Work-Family Mismatch and Child Health and Well-Being: A Review of the Economics Research In: Work, Family, Health, and Well-being.
Suzanne M. Bianchi, Lynne M. Casper, and Rosalind Berkowitz King, eds., Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 2005: 297-312.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
ID Number: 5118
Publisher: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

DEARY, IAN J. DER, GEOFF SHENKIN, SUSAN D.
Does Mother's IQ Explain the Association Between Birth Weight and Cognitive Ability in Childhood?
Intelligence 33,5 (September 2005): 445-454
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
ID Number: 5120
Publisher: Elsevier Science

TURNER, MICHAEL G. PIQUERO, ALEX R. PRATT, TRAVIS C.
School Context as a Source of Self-Control
Journal of Criminal Justice 33,4 (July-May 2005): 327-339
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 5121
Publisher: Elsevier Science

HART, DANIEL
The Development of Moral Identity
Nebraska Symposium on Motivation 51 (2005): 165-196
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 5122
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press

MAGEE, TRACY
Behavior Problems in Childhood: Testing an Interactive Model
Ph.D. Dissertation, Boston College, 2004. DAI-B 66/03, p. 1397, Sep 2005
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
ID Number: 5123
Publisher: ProQuest Information and Learning

GUTTMANNOVA, KATARINA
Development of Externalizing and Internalizing Behavior Problems During Middle Childhood: Risk and Protective Factors
Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Montana, 2004. DAI-B 66/02, p. 1197, Aug 2005
Cohort(s):
ID Number: 5124
Publisher: ProQuest Information and Learning

TERRIS, KRISTIN LYNN
Evaluating Match Quality in Labor Markets
Ph.D. Dissertation, Georgetown University, 2004. DAI-A 66/01, p. 288, Jul 2005 Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 5125
Publisher: ProQuest Information and Learning

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--
Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu