Current Demographic Research Report #104, October 10, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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Index to this issue:

CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

U.S.

Census Bureau Compendium. Report

National Institutes of Health News Releases

National Center for Health Statistics Report: "NHIS Health Insurance Coverage: Estimates January-March 2005"

National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program Compendium: _SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2002_

Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Report: "Treatment Admissions in Rural Areas, 2003"

Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant for Planning and Evaluation Issue Brief: "Overview of the Uninsured in the United States: An analysis of the 2005 Current Population Survey"

National Center for Education Statistics Report: "A Profile of the American High School Senior in 2004: A First Look. Initial Results From the First Follow-up of the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002)"

Department of Housing and Urban Development Periodical: _U.S. Housing Market Conditions, 2nd Quarter, 2005_

Government Printing Office/University of Michigan Digital Library Compendia: _Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States 1929-2000_ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Albania:

Albania Institute of Statistics: Publications from the 2001 Albanian Census +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Canada:

Canadian Institute for Health Information/Institut canadien d'information sur la sante Report: "Exploring the 70/30 Split: How Canada's Health Care System Is Financed
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Cyprus:

Statistical Service of the Republic of Cyprus Compendium: _Education Statistics 2003-2004_ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Eurostat

News Release, Statistics in Focus:
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Scotland:

General Register Office for Scotland News Release: "Latest Life Expectancy Figures Announced" +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Slovenia:

Statistical Office of Slovenia News Release: "Children in Slovenia" +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

UK:

UK Commission for Rural Communities Report: "Commission for Rural Communities: Tackling rural disadvantage" +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

Population Reference Bureau Webcast

Higher Education Research Institute (UCLA): "The Spiritual Life of College Students: A National Study of Students' Search for Meaning and Purpose"

RAND Corporation Report: "Achieving State and National Literacy Goals, a Long Uphill Road: A Report to Carnegie Corporation of New York"

_Demographic Research_ Article: "Changing mortality and average cohort life expectancy"

Urban Institute Article: "Fairness in new New Orleans"

Kaiser Family Foundation Issue Brief: "Premium Assistance Programs: How Are They Financed and Do States Save Money?"

World Health Organization Report: "Preventing Chronic Diseases: A Vital Investment"

Organisation for Economic Development and Co-operation Policy Brief: " Changing Social Institutions to Improve the Status of Women in Developing Countries"

International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B): Centre for Health and Population Research Reports:

Books on Indian (India) Demography

_Nature_ Special Issue: "Focus on 1918 Pandemic Flu"

_Science_ Article Abstract: "Characterization of the Reconstructed 1918 Spanish Influenza Pandemic Virus,"

_Lancet_ Series: "Chronic Diseases"

_Economist_ Article: "Unhappy Rebirthday"

Info Health Pop. Reporter

WORKING PAPERS

University of Michigan Population Studies Center
University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty
National Bureau of Economic Research
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Economics Working Paper Archive, Washington University at St. Louis

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta Other Journals

CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS

University of Strathclyde (Glasgow, Scotland): From the Cradle to the Grave: Future perspectives on the Social History of Health and Healthcare"

DATA

National Health Interview Survey Revisions
ICPSR SAMHDA: Treatment Episode Data Set
Mexican Migration Project
Luxembourg Income Study

BIBLIOGRAPHY UPDATES

National Longitudinal Survey

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

U.S.:

1. Census Bureau Compendium, Report:

A. _Residential Finance Survey: 2001_ (Census 2000 Special Reports CENSR-27, September 2005, .pdf format, 368p.). The report is linked to from a Census Bureau news release: "Residential Finance Survey: 2001" (Oct. 5, 2005).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/finance_insurance_real_estate/005795.html

B. "Population Change in Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas: 1990-2003," by Paul J. Mackun (Current Population Report P25-1134 September 2005, .pdf format, 20p.).

http://www.census.gov/prod/2005pubs/p25-1134.pdf

2. National Institutes of Health News Releases:

A. "National Survey Sharpens Picture of Major Depression Among U.S. Adults" (Oct. 3, 2005).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/oct2005/niaaa-03a.htm

B. "Vast Majority of Adults at Risk of Becoming Overweight or Obese," (October 3, 2005).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/oct2005/nhlbi-03.htm

C. "Genomes of More than 200 Human Flu Strains Reveal a Dynamic Virus," (October 5, 2005).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/oct2005/niaid-05.htm

D. "National Stereotypes Common, Mistaken, Study Reports," (October 6, 2005).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/oct2005/nia-06.htm

3. National Center for Health Statistics Report: "NHIS (National Health Interview Survey) Health Insurance Coverage: Estimates January-March 2005," by Robin A. Cohen, and Michael E. Martinez (September 2005, .pdf format, 16p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhis/earlyrelease/insur200509.pdf

4. National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program Compendium, Report:

A. _SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2002_. "The SEER Cancer Statistics Review (CSR), a report of the most recent cancer incidence, mortality, survival, prevalence, and lifetime risk statistics, is published annually by the Cancer Statistics Branch of the NCI. The scope and purpose of this work are consistent with a report to the Senate Appropriations Committee (Breslow, 1988) which recommended that a broad profile of cancer be presented to the American public on a routine basis. This edition includes statistics from 1975 through 2002, the most recent year for which data are available."

http://www.seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2002/

B. "Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2002, Featuring Population-Based Trends in Cancer Treatment, by Brenda K. Edwards, Martin L. Brown, Phyllis A. Wingo, Holly L. Howe, Elizabeth Ward, Lynn A. G. Ries, Deborah Schrag, Patricia M. Jamison, Ahmedin Jemal, Xiao Cheng Wu, Carol Friedman, Linda Harlan, Joan Warren, Robert N. Anderson, Linda W. Pickle. "The American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries collaborate to provide an annual update on cancer occurrence and trends in the United States. The current report, published in October 2005, contains a special feature on population-based trends in cancer treatment." Note: the report appears in _Journal of the National Cancer Institute_ (Vol. 97, No. 9, 2005, p. 1407-1427). Full text (HTML and .pdf format may be available. Check with your organization's library.

http://www.seer.cancer.gov/report_to_nation/1975_2002/

5. Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Report: "Treatment Admissions in Rural Areas, 2003" _The DASIS (Drug and Alcohol Services Information System) Report_, September 30, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k5/rural/rural.cfm

6. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant for Planning and Evaluation Issue Brief: "Overview of the Uninsured in the United States: An analysis of the 2005 Current Population Survey" (September, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 11p.).

http://aspe.hhs.gov/health/reports/05/uninsured-cps/index.htm

7. National Center for Education Statistics Report: "A Profile of the American High School Senior in 2004: A First Look. Initial Results From the First Follow-up of the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002)," by Steven J. Ingels, Michael Planty, and Robert Bozick (NCES 2006348, October 2005, .pdf format, 95p.).

Abstract:

This report presents initial findings from the first follow-up of the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002). ELS:2002 is the fourth major secondary school longitudinal study sponsored by NCES, closely reflecting the research purposes and design of its three predecessor studies, NLS-72, HS&B, and NELS:88. ELS:2002 began with a nationally representative sample of 10th-graders in 2002. In the first follow-up, this sophomore cohort was studied 2 years later (2004), and the sample freshened to provide a representative sample of 12th-graders. This ED TAB report summarizes the demographic and educational characteristics of the high school senior class of 2004. It also reports on the senior cohort's mathematics achievement, their expectations for eventual educational attainment, the importance to them of various institutional characteristics in choosing a college, and their values and plans.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006348

8. Department of Housing and Urban Development Periodical: _U.S. Housing Market Conditions, 2nd Quarter, 2005_ (August 2005, .pdf and Microsoft Word format).

http://www.huduser.org/periodicals/ushmc.html

Click on "Current Issue".

An archive going back to 4th Quarter 1994 is available at:

http://www.huduser.org/periodicals/ushmc/ushmc.html

9. Government Printing Office/University of Michigan Digital Library Compendia: _Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States 1929-2000_: "The Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States contains material that was compiled and published by the Office of the Federal Register, National Archives and Records Administration. It includes volumes covering the administrations of Presidents Hoover, Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton. As subsequent volumes are published, they will be added online. Each Public Papers volume contains the papers and speeches of the President of the United States that were issued by the Office of the Press Secretary during the specified time period. The material is presented in chronological order, and the dates shown in the headings are the dates of the documents or events. In instances when the release date differs from the date of the document itself, that fact is shown in the textnote. To ensure accuracy, remarks have been checked against a tape recording and signed documents have been checked against the original, unless otherwise noted. Textnotes and cross references have been provided by the editors for purposes of identification or clarity. Speeches were delivered in Washington, DC, unless indicated. The times noted are local times." Papers are browsable and searchable. Browsable volumes are available for download page by page and contain comprehensive indices.

http://www.hti.umich.edu/p/ppotpus/
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Albania:

Albania Institute of Statistics: Publications from the 2001 Albanian Census: The following publications regarding the 2001 Albanian Census have been recently released. All are in .pdf format and, at present, can be accessed from:

http://www.instat.gov.al/repoba/english/Researches.html

A. Gender Perspectives in Albania (2005, .pdf format, 62p.).

http://www.instat.gov.al/repoba/english/Researches/anglisht/gender/gender25fevrie05.pdf

B. "Population Projections for Albania, 2001-2021 (2005, .pdf format, 129p.).

http://www.instat.gov.al/repoba/english/Researches/anglisht/projections/projection25fevrier05.pdf

C. "People and Work in Albania (2005, .pdf format, 98p.).

http://www.instat.gov.al/repoba/english/Researches/anglisht/people%20and%20work/people%20and%20work25fevrier05.pdf

D. "Migration in Albania (2005, .pdf format, 68p.).

http://www.instat.gov.al/repoba/english/Researches/anglisht/migration/migration25fevrie05.pdf

E. Living Conditions and Inequality in Albania (2005, .pdf format, 48p.).

http://www.instat.gov.al/repoba/english/Researches/anglisht/living%20conditions/Living%20Condition%2025%20shkurt2005.pdf +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Canada:

Canadian Institute for Health Information/Institut canadien d'information sur la sante Report: "Exploring the 70/30 Split: How Canada's Health Care System Is Financed" (September 2005, .pdf format, 147p.). Note: CIHI/ICIS requires free registration before providing content. "Fewer services are channelled through physicians and hospitals, and both sectors account for decreasing percentages of total health expenditures. Total spending on health care has risen and private spending by individuals or insurers has been growing more quickly than public spending. Today, about 70% of total Canadian health expenditures comes from the public purse. The remainder (about 30%) comes from private sources. In this report, we look at trends in financing and at variations in this 70/30 split across provinces and territories."

http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/dispPage.jsp?cw_page=PG_469_E&cw_topic=469&cw_rel=AR_1282_E +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Cyprus:

Statistical Service of the Republic of Cyprus Compendium: _Education Statistics 2003-2004_ (September 2005, .pdf format, 291p.).

http://www.mof.gov.cy/mof/cystat/statistics.nsf/All/D2278E2DFF1CE3A2C225707A002A7798/$file/EDUCATION_0304.pdf?OpenElement +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Eurostat:

Eurostat News Release, Statistics in Focus:

A. "Regional unemployment rates in the EU25 ranged from 2.4% to 32.8% in 2004" (Oct. 7, 2005).

http://epp.eurostat.cec.eu.int/pls/portal/docs/PAGE/PGP_PRD_CAT_PREREL/PGE_CAT_PREREL_YEAR_2005/PGE_CAT_PREREL_YEAR_2005_MONTH_10/1-07102005-EN-AP.PDF

B. "Regional unemployment in the European Union and candidate countries in 2004 - Issue number 3/2005" (September 2005, .pdf format, 8p.). "In 2004, the unemployment rate in the EU 25 NUTS level 2 regions varied between 2.4 % in the south-western UK region of Dorset and Somerset and 24.9 % in the south-western Polish region of Dolnoslaskie. The lowest youth unemployment rate was observed in the south-western Dutch region of Zeeland (5.4 %), the highest in the northern Greek region of Dytiki Makedonia (49.3 %). In Romania, the unemployment rate was below 10 % in all level 2 regions, while in Bulgaria it was between 9.4 % and 17.6 %. These figures are derived from the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU-LFS)."

http://epp.eurostat.cec.eu.int/portal/page?_pageid=1073,46587259&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL&p_product_code=KS-DN-05-003
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Scotland:

General Register Office for Scotland News Release: "Latest Life Expectancy Figures Announced" (Oct. 6, 2005).

http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/press/news2005/0204le-press.html +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Slovenia:

Statistical Office of Slovenia News Release: "Children in Slovenia" (Oct. 4, 2005).

http://www.stat.si/eng/novice_poglej.asp?ID=744
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UK:

UK Commission for Rural Communities Report: "Commission for Rural Communities: Tackling rural disadvantage"

http://www.ruralcommunities.gov.uk/data/uploads/CRC11.pdf

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REPORTS, ARTICLES, NEWS RELEASES, COMPENDIUMS

Population Reference Bureau: "Immigration and Assimilation: What We Still Don't Know and Why It Matters," by Sandra Yin (Webcast of symposium held at PRB on September 29, 2005, Windows Media Player required, running time: 1 hour, 18 minutes, 46 seconds. The webcast is accompanied by selected Microsoft PowerPoint slide shows).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/Events_Training/2005_Webcasts/Immigration_and_Assimilation__What_We_Still_Dont_Know_and_Why_It_Matters.htm -------------------------------------------------------------------------

Higher Education Research Institute (UCLA): "The Spiritual Life of College Students: A National Study of Students' Search for Meaning and Purpose" (October 2005, .pdf format, 23p.).

http://www.spirituality.ucla.edu/reports/index.html

Click on titles for links to full text.

Press release:

http://spirituality.ucla.edu/news/2005-10-06.html

More information about Spirituality in Higher Education Project:

http://www.spirituality.ucla.edu/about/index.html
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RAND Corporation Report: "Achieving State and National Literacy Goals, a Long Uphill Road: A Report to Carnegie Corporation of New York," by Jennifer Sloan McCombs, Sheila Nataraj Kirby, Heather Barney, Hilary Darilek, and Scarlett J. Magee (2005, .pdf format, 386p.).

Abstract:

RAND gathered information from the 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) on state assessment systems and student performance on reading or English language arts and writing assessments in order to measure adolescent's (grades 4 through 12) performance toward state literacy goals. Also examines the relative performance of students against national standards represented by the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP).

http://www.rand.org/publications/TR/TR180-1/
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_Demographic Research_ Article: Note: _DR_ is "a free, expedited, peer-reviewed journal of the population sciences published by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research [Rostock, Germany]. "Changing mortality and average cohort life expectancy," by Robert Schoen and Vladimir Canudas-Romo (Vol. 13, Article 5, .pdf format, p. 117-142).

Abstract:

Period life expectancy varies with changes in mortality, and should not be confused with the life expectancy of those alive during that period. Given past and likely future mortality changes, a recent debate has arisen on the usefulness of the period life expectancy as the leading measure of survivorship. An alternative aggregate measure of period mortality which has been seen as less sensitive to period changes, the cross-sectional average length of life (CAL) has been proposed as an alternative, but has received only limited empirical or analytical examination. Here, we introduce a new measure, the average cohort life expectancy (ACLE), to provide a precise measure of the average length of life of cohorts alive at a given time. To compare the performance of ACLE with CAL and with period and cohort life expectancy, we first use population models with changing mortality. Then the four aggregate measures of mortality are calculated for England and Wales, Norway, and Switzerland for the years 1880 to 2000. CAL is found to be sensitive to past and present changes in death rates. ACLE requires the most data, but gives the best representation of the survivorship of cohorts present at a given time.

http://www.demographic-research.org/

Click on "Enter".
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Urban Institute Article: "Fairness in new New Orleans," by Xavier de Souza Briggs and Margery Austin Turner (October, 2005).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=900886
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Kaiser Family Foundation Issue Brief: "Premium Assistance Programs: How Are They Financed and Do States Save Money?" by Joan Alker (KFF Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, October 2005, .pdf format, 16p.).

Abstract:

This brief examines premium assistance programs implemented under section 1115 waivers in five states (Illinois, New Jersey, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah) to determine how they are financed; their eligibility, benefit, and cost sharing requirements; their methods for determining cost-effectiveness; and cost savings.

http://www.kff.org/medicaid/7413.cfm
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World Health Organization Report: "Preventing Chronic Diseases: A Vital Investment" (2005, .pdf format, 182p.).

http://www.who.int/chp/chronic_disease_report/full_report.pdf
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Organisation for Economic Development and Co-operation Policy Brief: " Changing Social Institutions to Improve the Status of Women in Developing Countries," by Johannes Jutting and Christian Morrisson (OECD Development Centre Policy Brief No. 27, 2005, .pdf format, 26p.).

http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/24/32/35155725.pdf
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International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B): Centre for Health and Population Research Reports via Population and Health InfoShare:

A. "Accuracy of demographic indicators measured by geographical reconnaissance," (_Health and Science Bulletin_, Vol. 3, No. 3, September 2005, .pdf format, p. 6-10).

Abstract:

Each year fieldworkers from the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare attempt to visit all households in Bangladesh to collect extensive data in an activity termed geographical reconnaissance. We compared national estimates of crude birth rate; infant mortality rate and crude death rate calculated using data collected through geographical reconnaissance with results obtained from a sample vital registration system of the Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics and with the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey. While the estimates of crude birth rate were broadly similar, estimates of infant mortality rate were 75% lower and estimates of crude death rate were 40% lower from geographical reconnaissance than from the other systems. Given the substantial commitment of resources devoted to generating these data, and their inaccuracy, steps to streamline the process should be considered.

http://www.phishare.org/documents/icddrb/3461/

B. "Effect of temporary out-migration of husbands on use of contraception in a rural area of Bangladesh," (_Health and Science Bulletin_, Vol. 3, No. 3, September 2005, .pdf format, p. 10-15).

Abstract:

Temporary migration for work abroad, or elsewhere in Bangladesh, affects a large proportion of families in certain areas. In the ICDDR,B surveillance area in Mirsarai (Chittagong district), about one-quarter of married women aged 15-49 years report that they have a husband living away from home. Analysis of surveillance data for the period 2001-2003 indicates that contraceptive use, even of permanent methods, is lower among these women. The absence of some husbands for extended periods reduces the contraceptive prevalence rate for the whole area considerably, which should be taken into account when assessing the coverage of family planning services for areas with high out-migration. Targeting women with a husband living away from home with counselling could improve their preparation for using contraception when he visits or returns home. Further research is in progress to assess the impact of separation on fertility rates.

http://www.phishare.org/documents/icddrb/3462/

More information on Population and Health InfoShare:

http://www.phishare.org/about/
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Books on Indian (India) Demography. The following new releases are available through K.K. Agencies Indian Booksellers. Descriptions and tables of contents are available by clicking on "Click here to view the Contents".

A. _Demographic Perspectives on India's Tribes_, by Arup Maharatna (2005, 306p., Oxford University Press, New Delhi, ISBN: 0195670868).

https://www.kkagencies.com/servlet/kgetbiblio?name=Demographic%20Perspectives%20on%20India%60s%20Tribes&suffix=&sessionid=cu32306va1&author=Arup%20Maharatna&n=KK-36391

B. _Fertility Transition in South India_, edited by Christophe Z. Guilmoto and S. Irudaya Rajan (2005, 452p., Sage Publications India, New Delhi, ISBN: 8178294184).

https://www.kkagencies.com/servlet/kgetbiblio?name=Fertility%20Transition%20in%20South%20India&suffix=&sessionid=cu32306va1&author=Edited%20by%20Christophe%20Z.%20Guilmoto%20and%20S.%20Irudaya%20Rajan&n=KK-35608
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_Science_ Article Abstract: "Characterization of the Reconstructed 1918 Spanish Influenza Pandemic Virus," by Terrence M. Tumpey, Christopher F. Basler, Patricia V. Aguilar, Hui Zeng, Alicia Solórzano, David E. Swayne, Nancy J. Cox, Jacqueline M. Katz, Jeffery K. Taubenberger, Peter Palese, and Adolfo García-Sastre (Vol. 310, No. 5745, Oct. 7, 2005, p. 77-80).

http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/310/5745/77

Related Centers for Disease Control news release: "Researchers Reconstruct 1918 Pandemic Influenza Virus; Effort Designed to Advance Preparedness." (October 5, 2005).

http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/r051005.htm
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_Nature_ Special Issue: "Focus on 1918 Pandemic Flu": The latest issue of _Nature (Vol. 437, No. 7060, Oct. 6, 2005, focuses on the 1918 flu epidemic. Article abstracts are freely available to the public. Full text (HTML and .pdf format are available to individual or institutional subscribers. Check your organization's library.

http://www.nature.com/nature/focus/1918flu/index.html
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_Lancet_ Series: Note: _Lancet_ requires free registration before providing articles. "Chronic Diseases." This series consists of five articles on the topic.

http://www.thelancet.com/collections/series/chronic_diseases
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_Economist_ Article: "Unhappy Rebirthday: Scientists have recreated the 1918 flu virus in order to reveal its secrets" (Oct. 6, 2005).

http://www.economist.com/displaystory.cfm?story_id=4484333
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Info Health Pop. Reporter: info Health Pop. Reporter: Info Health Pop. Reporter: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (vol. 5, no. 41, Oct. 10, 2005). " The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

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WORKING PAPERS:

University of Michigan Population Studies Center: "Chronic Disease and Trends in Severe Disability in Working Age Populations," by Jay Bhattacharya, Kavita Choudhry, and Darius Lakdawalla (TRENDS Working Paper No. 05-4, September 2005, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

Recent work has shown that rates of severe disability, measured by the inability to perform basic activities of daily living, have been rising in working age populations. We examine the extent to which chronic disease trends can explain these disability trends. Our primary findings are that for 30 to 45 year-old populations between 1984 and 1996: (1) disability prevalence fell dramatically among the non-chronically ill; (2) rising obesity prevalence explains about 40% of the rise in disability attributable to trends chronic illness; and (3) rising disability prevalence among the chronically ill explains about 60% of the rise in disability attributable to trends in chronic illness.

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.html?ID=3846

Click on PDF icon for full text.
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University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty: Institute for Research on Poverty: "Mexican Immigration and Self-Selection:New Evidence from the 2000 Mexican Census," by Pablo Ibarraran and Darren Lubotsky (Discussion Paper no. 1308-05, October 2005, .pdf format, 40p.).

Abstract:

We use data from the 2000 Mexican Census to examine how the educational and socioeconomic status of Mexican immigrants to the United States compares to that of nonmigrants in Mexico. Our primary conclusion is that migrants tend to be less educated than non-migrants. This finding is consistent with the idea that the return to education is higher in Mexico than in the United States, and thus the wage gain to migrating is proportionately smaller for higher-educated Mexicans than it is for lower-educated Mexicans. We also find that the degree of negative selection of migrants is stronger in Mexican counties that have a higher return to education.

http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp130805.pdf
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National Bureau of Economic Research: Note: NBER papers are available by individual or institutional subscription only. Check your organization's library for more information.

A. "Teachers and the Gender Gaps in Student Achievement," by Thomas S. Dee (w11660, October 2005, .pdf format, 41p.).

Abstract:

In the United States, girls outperform boys in measures of reading achievement while generally underperforming in science and mathematics. One major class of explanations for these gaps involves the gender-based interactions between students and teachers (e.g., role-model and Pygmalion effects). However, the evidence on whether these interactions actually matter is limited and contradictory. In this study, I present new empirical evidence on whether assignment to a same-gender teacher influences student achievement, teacher perceptions of student performance, and student engagement. This study's identification strategy exploits a unique "matched pairs" feature of a major longitudinal survey. Within-student comparisons based on these data indicate that assignment to a same-gender teacher significantly improves the achievement of both girls and boys as well as teacher perceptions of student performance and student engagement with the teacher's subject. For example, assignment to a female science teacher increases the likelihood that a girl views science as useful for her future. However, because the middle-school teachers in most academic subjects are female, these results also suggest that the gender dynamics between teachers and students at this level amplify boys' large underperformance in reading while attenuating the more modest underperformance of girls in math and science.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11660

B: "Rethinking the Gains from Immigration: Theory and Evidence from the U.S.," by Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano and Giovanni Peri (w11672, October 2005, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

Recent influential empirical work has emphasized the negative impact immigrants have on the wages of U.S.-born workers, arguing that immigration harms less educated American workers in particular and all U.S.-born workers in general. Because U.S. and foreign born workers belong to different skill groups that are imperfectly substitutable, one needs to articulate a production function that aggregates different types of labor (and accounts for complementarity and substitution effects) in order to calculate the various effects of immigrant labor on U.S.-born labor. We introduce such a production function, making the crucial assumption that U.S. and foreign-born workers with similar education and experience levels may nevertheless be imperfectly substitutable, and allowing for endogenous capital accumulation. This function successfully accounts for the negative impact of the relative skill levels of immigrants on the relative wages of U.S. workers. However, contrary to the findings of previous literature, overall immigration generates a large positive effect on the average wages of U.S.-born workers. We show evidence of this positive effect by estimating the impact of immigration on both average wages and housing values across U.S. metropolitan areas (1970-2000). We also reproduce this positive effect by simulating the behavior of average wages and housing prices in an open city-economy, with optimizing U.S.-born agents who respond to an inflow of foreign-born workers of the size and composition comparable to the immigration of the 1990s.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11672

C. "Health Risk, Income, and the Purchase of Private Health Insurance, by M. Kate Bundorf, Bradley Herring, and Mark Pauly (w11677, October 2005, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

While many believe that an individual's health plays an important role in both their willingness and ability to obtain health insurance, relatively little agreement exists on how and why health status is likely to affect coverage rates, particularly for individuals purchasing coverage in the individual market. In this paper, we examine the relationship between health risk and the purchase of private health insurance and whether that relationship differs between people purchasing coverage in the individual and large group markets and between low and high income individuals. The data source for our analysis is the panel component of the 1996-2002 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). We find that health risk is positively associated with obtaining private health insurance coverage. The positive relationship between health risk and coverage is stronger for individuals obtaining coverage in the large group market than for individuals obtaining coverage in the individual market. In the large group market, rates of coverage increase more quickly with health risk for low than high income individuals. We conclude that high premiums for high risks are not a significant contributor to the large uninsured population in the U.S. Among low income individuals, high premiums may represent a barrier to low risks in the large group market.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11677

D. "Job Loss, Job Finding, and Unemployment in the U.S. Economy Over the Past Fifty Years," by Robert E. Hall (w11678, October 2005, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

New data compel a new view of events in the labor market during a recession. Unemployment rises almost entirely because jobs become harder to find. Recessions involve little increase in the flow of workers out of jobs. Another important finding from new data is that a large fraction of workers departing jobs move to new jobs without intervening unemployment. I develop estimates of separation rates and job-finding rates for the past 50 years, using historical data informed by detailed recent data. The separation rate is nearly constant while the job-finding rate shows high volatility at business-cycle and lower frequencies. I review modern theories of fluctuations in the job-finding rate. The challenge to these theories is to identify mechanisms in the labor market that amplify small changes in driving forces into fluctuations in the job-finding rate of the high magnitude actually observed. In the standard theory developed over the past two decades, the wage moves to offset driving forces and the predicted magnitude of changes in the job-finding rate is tiny. New models overcome this property by invoking a new form of sticky wages or by introducing information and other frictions into the employment relationship.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11678
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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "Counseling the Unemployed: Does It Lower Unemployment Duration and Recurrence?," by Bruno Crepon, Muriel Dejemeppe, and Marc Gurgand (Discussion Paper 1796, October 2005, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

This article evaluates the effects of intensive counseling schemes that are provided to about 20% of the unemployed since the 2001 French unemployment policy reform (PARE). Several of the schemes are dedicated at improving the quality of assignment of workers to jobs. As a result, it is necessary to assess their impact on unemployment recurrence as well as unemployment duration. Using duration models and a very rich data set, we can identify heterogenous and time-dependent causal effects of the schemes. We find significant favorable effects on both outcomes, but the impact on unemployment recurrence is stronger than on unemployment duration. In particular, the program shifts the incidence of recurrence, one year after employment, from 33 to 26%. This illustrates that labor market policies evaluations that consider unemployment duration alone can be misleading.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1796.pdf

B. "To Study or to Work? Education and Labour Market Participation of Young People in Poland," by Francesco Pastore (Discussion Paper 1793, October 2005, .pdf format, 32p.).

Abstract:

This paper proposes Heckprobit estimates of the determinants of labour market participation of a sample of young (15-30) Poles, controlling for the sample selection bias caused by excluding those in education. There is evidence of sample selection bias in the case of young men, suggesting that they obey more than women to economic factors in making their educational choices. Education is an important determinant of the success in the labour market. The instrumental variables used in the selection equation --the local unemployment rate, expected lifetime earnings and the opportunity cost of education--have a statistically significant impact on the probability to be in education. In contrast with several previous studies relative to mature market economies, in high unemployment voivodships young people prefer to seek a job, rather than studying. In turn, this contributes to make regional unemployment persistent.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1793.pdf

C. "The Impact of Incarceration in State Prison on the Employment Prospects of Women," by Rosa Cho and Robert J. LaLonde (Discussion Paper 1792, October 2005, .pdf format, 51p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses a unique data set constructed from two sets of administrative records to examine the relationship between incarceration and employment rates for former female state prisoners from Illinois. Our analysis indicates that although prison is associated with declining employment rates during the quarters leading up to women's incarcerations, it does not appear to harm their employment prospects later on. In the short-term, we estimate that women's post-prison employment rates are about four percentage points above expected levels. However, these employment gains do not persist and gradually fall back to pre-prison levels. But for some groups of women, including those with four or more children, those who served longer prison spells, and those who served time for person-related or drug-related offenses, we find that modestly positive employment effects that are on the order of a few percentage points persist. These results indicate that time out of the work force or diminished skills are not costs associated with incarcerating women. Nor does a prison record appear to send an undesirable signal in the labor market that reduces former female inmates' employment chances. Although incarcerated women's subsequent employment rates are very low, they do not appear to be low because of their experience in prison.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1792.pdf

D. "Birth Order, Educational Attainment and Earnings: An Investigation Using the PSID," by Jasmin Kantarevic and Stephane Mechoulan (Discussion Paper 1789, September 2005, .pdf format, 31p.).

Abstract:

Whether siblings of specific birth order perform differently has been a longstanding open empirical question. We use the family tree structure of the PSID to examine two claims found in the literature: whether being early in the birth order implies a distinct educational advantage, and whether there exists, within large families, a pattern of falling then rising attainment with respect to birth order, to the point where it becomes best to be last-born. Drawing from OLS and family fixed effects estimations, we find that being f-born confers a significant educational advantage that persists when considering earnings; being last-born confers none.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1789.pdf

E. "Do Divorcing Couples Become Happier By Breaking Up?," by Jonathan Gardner and Andrew J. Oswald (Discussion Paper 1788, September 2005, .pdf format, 38p.).

Abstract:

Divorce is a leap in the dark. This paper investigates whether people who split up actually become happier. Using the British Household Panel Survey, we are able to observe an individual's level of psychological wellbeing in the years before and after divorce. Our results show that divorcing couples reap psychological gains from the dissolution of their marriages. Men and women benefit equally. The paper also studies the effects of bereavement, of having dependent children, and of remarriage. We measure wellbeing using GHQ and life-satisfaction scores.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1788.pdf

F. "The Division of Labor by New Parents: Does Child Gender Matter?," by Shelly Lundberg (Discussion Paper 1787, September 2005, .pdf format, 33p.).

Abstract:

This paper documents some distinct and surprising patterns of specialization among new parents in the NLSY79. Child gender has significant effects on the labor supply of both mothers and father, and these effects are opposite at the two ends of the education spectrum--boys reduce specialization among the college-educated and increase specialization among parents with less than a high school education. Estimates from the recent American Time Use Survey are generally consistent with the NLSY79 findings, and indicate that highly-educated parents devote more childcare time to young sons. The labor supply results are inconsistent with previous research that found boys substantially increase the work hours of their fathers relative to girls but have no effect on mother's work hours. Possible explanations for the heterogeneous responses to sons and daughters across education groups include a bias towards same-sex parental inputs as desired child quality increases and child gender effects on the relative bargaining power of the mother and father. No evidence of improved maternal bargaining power can be found in the leisure consumption of mothers of young sons in the ATUS, but patterns in parental childcare time suggest gender differences in child production functions.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1787.pdf

G. "Why Are Similar Workers Paid Differently? The Role of Social Networks," by Francois Fontaine (Discussion Paper 1786, September 2005, .pdf format, 21p.).

Abstract:

We provide a matching model where identical workers are embedded in ex-ante identical social networks. Job arrival rate is endogenous and wages are bargained. We study the evolution of networks over time and characterize the equilibrium distribution of unemployment rates across networks. We emphasize that wage dispersion arises endogenously as the consequence of the dynamics of networks, firms' strategies and wage bargaining. Moreover, contrary to a generally accepted idea, social networks do not necessary induce stickiness in unemployment dynamics. Our endogenous matching technology shows that the effects of networks on the dynamics mostly hinge on search externalities. Our endogenous framework allows us to quantify these effects.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1786.pdf

H. "Collective Labour Supply: Heterogeneity and Nonparticipation," by Richard Blundell, Pierre-Andre Chiappori, Thierry Magnac, and Costas Meghir (Discussion Paper 1785, September 2005, .pdf format, 56p.).

Abstract:

We present identification and estimation results for the "collective" model of labour supply in which there are discrete choices, censoring of hours and nonparticipation in employment. We derive the collective restrictions on labour supply functions and contrast them with restrictions implied by the usual "unitary" framework. Using the large changes in the wage structure between men and women in the UK over the last two decades we estimate a collective labor supply model for married couples without children. The implications of the unitary framework are rejected while those of the collective approach are not. The estimates of the sharing rule show that wages have a strong influence on bargaining power within couples.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1785.pdf

I. "High Skilled Immigration in the International Arena," by Barry R. Chiswick (Discussion Paper 1782, September 2005, .pdf format, 8p.).

Abstract:

This conceptual paper, prepared for a United Nations Expert Group Meeting on Migration and Development, is concerned with the international mobility of high-skilled workers, previously referred to as the "brain drain". After discussing the historical background of high-skilled international migration, the paper examines the reasons for the recent growth in demand for high-skilled workers in the technologically advanced nations. If then examines the impact of high-skilled migration on the level and distribution of income in the destinations. The causes and consequences of high-skilled emigration from the perspective of the origins or sending countries are examined. Educational finance and taxing policies that encourage emigration, emigrant remittances, and the "brain gain" from returning emigrants are discussed. Alternative public policies are considered.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1782.pdf

J. "On the Common Claim that Happiness Equations Demonstrate Diminishing Marginal Utility of Income," by Andrew J. Oswald (Discussion Paper 1781, September 2005, .pdf format, 5p.).

Abstract:

It is commonly claimed in the recent happiness literature in psychology and economics that we have proved diminishing marginal utility of income. This paper suggests that we have not. It draws a distinction between concavity of the utility function and concavity of the reporting function.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1781.pdf
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Economics Working Paper Archive, Washington University at St. Louis: Birth Spacing and Child Survival: Comparative Evidence from India and Pakistan," by Pushkar Maitra and Sarmistha Pal (June 2005, .pdf format, 61p.).

Abstract:

In view of higher fertility and mortality rates in Pakistan compared to India, this paper examines the two-way relationship between birth interval and child mortality and compares the behaviour of households in the Indian and Pakistani provinces of Punjab. Birth interval and child survival are modelled here as correlated hazard processes to address the bias generated by the simultaneity between spacing and survival. We find evidence of significant mutual dependence between birth interval and child survival in both samples. We also identify a close correspondence between birth interval and duration of breastfeeding and argue that the duration of breastfeeding is a good instrument of birth spacing in our samples. There are also interesting differences between Indian and Pakistani households with respect to effects of son preference and female literacy. We argue that part of these differences could be explained by differences in religion and state policies in these two neighbouring states.

http://econwpa.wustl.edu:8089/eps/lab/papers/0509/0509010.pdf

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "advanced search" C. Type in your publication name and click "Exact title" radio button D. Under "Show", click the "fax/ariel" radio button. E. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

Ethnicity and Disease (Vol. 15, No. 3, 2005)
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Other Journals:

International Journal for Quality in Health Care (Vol. 17, No. 5, October 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://intqhc.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol17/issue5/index.dtl

Journal of Family Issues (Vol. 26, No. 8, November 1, 2005).

http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/vol26/issue8/?etoc

Work and Occupations (Vol. 32, No. 4, November 1, 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://wox.sagepub.com/content/vol32/issue4/?etoc

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CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS:

University of Strathclyde (Glasgow, Scotland): From the Cradle to the Grave: Future perspectives on the Social History of Health and Healthcare," a conference to be held Jan. 11-12, 2006 at Glasgow Caledonian University. For more information see:

http://www.strath.ac.uk/Departments/History/conf/call%20for.htm

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DATA:

National Health Interview Survey Revisions: "The 2003 NHIS Imputed Family Income/ Personal Earnings files have been revised to correct values of the variable RAT_CATI (ratio of family income to poverty threshold group) for 1,032 persons. The corrections affect persons in families consisting of one adult and three children, regardless of whether income was imputed. For persons in these families the calculation of the ratio of family income to poverty threshold has been revised to use the correct poverty threshold value ($18,307 instead of $183,072). No other data years were affected by this revision. The correct 2003 Imputed Family Income/ Personal Earnings files can be reached from:

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/major/nhis/2003imputedincome.htm
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Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive: ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following dataset, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

SAMHDA has made available via its online Data Analysis System, an interactive web-based data extractor, the Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) concatenated file for 1992-2003.

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/SAMHDA-SERIES/00056.xml

Click on "Online Analysis". Note that the concatenated file is only available via the DAS system. "Quick Tables" are also available for this dataset.
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Mexican Migration Project: The Mexican Migration Project now has a new database available: MMP107. "The MMP107 database has 107 communities, which includes the original 93 communities (MMP93) plus 14 new additional communities. This MMP107 database is available in both SAS and SPSS format." Note: Registration is required before using the database.

http://mmp.opr.princeton.edu/databases/alerts-en.aspx

Data access:

http://mmp.opr.princeton.edu/databases/instructions-en.aspx
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Luxembourg Income Study: LIS announced the release of 1995 Beligum and Greece 1995 and 2000 LIS data (October 6, 2005).

Belgium:

http://www.lisproject.org/techdoc/be/beindex.htm

Greece:

http://www.lisproject.org/techdoc/gr/grindex.htm

Data Access:

http://www.lisproject.org/dataccess.htm

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BIBLIOGRAPHY UPDATES

National Longitudinal Survey:

Note: These citations, along with all of the NLS bibliography, can be found at:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/

Note: Where available, direct links to full text have been provided. These references represent updated citations from Sep. 19- Oct. 7, 2005.

For more information on any of these citations (selected abstracts are available) go to the above listed address and click on "Title List". Click on the first item, which will give the syntax of the citation urls:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/qtitle.php3?myrow[0]=320

Then change the number after the equal sign (320 in this case) to the number listed as the "ID Number" in the citations below. You will be taken to the full citation listing.

AUGHINBAUGH, ALISON AILEEN PIERRET, CHARLES R. ROTHSTEIN, DONNA S.
The Impact of Family Structure Transitions on Youth Achievement: Evidence from the Children of the NLSY79
Demography, 42, 3 (August 2005): 447-468
Cohort(s):
ID Number: 5103
Publisher: Population Association of America

WALDFOGEL, JANE HAN, WEN-JUI
Parental Work Schedules, Home Life and Adolescents' Socio-Emotional Outcomes
Presented: Annual Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Research Conference, Washington, DC Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
ID Number: 5104
Publisher: Association for Public Analysis and Management (APPAM)

MAHNKEN, JONATHAN D. LI, CHAOYANG NAZIR, NIAMAN SO, JOSEPH KAUR, HARSOHENA AHLUWALLA, JASJIT S.
Analyzing the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth: A Comparison of Statistical Methods
Presented: Joint Statistical Meetings, August 2005, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
ID Number: 5105
Publisher: American Statistical Association

CARNEIRO, PEDRO M. HECKMAN, JAMES J. MASTEROV, DIMITRIY V.
Labor Market Discrimination and Racial Differences in Premarket Factors
Journal of Law and Economics, vol. XLVIII (April 2005)
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
ID Number: 5107
Publisher: University of Chicago Press

HECKMAN, JAMES J.
Lessons from the Technology of Skill Formation
NBER Working Paper No. 11142 (February 2005)
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
ID Number: 5109
Publisher: National Bureau of Economic Research -- NBER

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--
Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu