Current Demographic Research Report #102, September 26, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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Index to this issue:

CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

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U.S.:

Census Bureau News Release, Facts for Features
National Center for Health Statistics Reports
DHHS SAMHSA Report
National Institutes of Health News Release
Bureau of Labor Statistics News Releases
Bureau of Justice Statistics Report
DHHS ASPE Report
US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Report
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Albania Institute of Statistics: "Albania In Figures 2005"
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Australia Bureau of Statistics: "Migration Australia: 2003-2004"
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Czech Republic Statistical Office News Release: "Population of the Czech
Republic in increase due to immigrants"
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Statistics Denmark: _Statistical Yearbook 2005_
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Greece National Statistics Service: "Greece in Figures 2005"
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Japan Statistics Bureau: _Statistical Handbook of Japan 2005_
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Statistics Lithuania: _Education 2004_
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Statistics South Africa: "Marriages and Divorces--2002, 2003; Amended
Publications; Labour Force Survey, September 2000- March 2005"
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United Kingdom:

Department of Health: "NHS Immunisation Statistics, England: 2004-05"
Office of the Deputy Prime Minister: "Causes of Homelessness Amongst
Ethnic Minority Populations"
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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

Government Accountability Office Report
Institute of Medicine Report
United Nations Children's Fund Report
Pan American Health Health Organization Fact Sheet, Report:
Urban Institute Articles
Population Reference Bureau Periodical
_Public Opinion Quarterly_ Article Abstract
_Economist_ Article
_British Medical Journal_ Book Review Extract
Info Health Pop. Reporter

WORKING PAPERS

Institute for Research on Poverty (University of Wisconsin-Madison):
National Bureau of Economic Research
Cornell Higher Education Research Institute
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta
Other Journals

DATA

ICPSR

WEBSITES OF INTEREST

kaiserEDU.org Additions

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

U.S.:

1. Census Bureau News Release, Facts for Features

A. Census Bureau News Release: "Census Bureau Awards $500 Million Contract to Capture and Standardize 2010 Census Data" (CB05-137, Sep. 26, 2005).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/census_2010/005715.html

B. Census Bureau Facts for Features: "Veterans Day 2005: Nov. 11" (Facts for Features CB05-FF.17, Sep. 15, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 2p.).

HTML:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/005696.html

.pdf:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2005/cb05ff17.pdf

C. Census Bureau Facts for Features: "Thanksgiving Day: Nov. 24, 2005" (Facts for Features CB05-FF.18, Sep. 26, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 4p.).

HTML:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/005712.html

pdf:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2005/cb05ff-18.pdf

2. National Center for Health Statistics Reports:

A. "Births: Final Data for 2003," Joyce A. Martin, Brady E. Hamilton, Paul D. Sutton, Stephanie J. Ventura, Fay Menacker, and Martha L. Munson (National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 54, No. 2, September 2005, .pdf format, 116p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr54/nvsr54_02.pdf

B. "Trends in Cesarean Rates for First Births and Repeat Cesarean Rates for Low-Risk Women: 1990-2003," by Fay Menacker (National Vital Statistics Report, Vol. 54, No. 4, September 2005, .pdf format, 12p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr54/nvsr54_04.pdf

3. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Reports:

A. "The NSDUH Report: Methamphetamine Use, Abuse, and Dependence: 2002, 2003, and 2004" (Sept. 2005, .pdf and HTML format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k5/meth/meth.cfm

B. "Treatment Admissions for Injection Drug Use: 2003" (_The DASIS Report_, September 23, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k5/injecting/injecting.cfm

4. National Institutes of Health News Release: "Researchers Discover How Malaria Parasite Disperses From Red Blood Cells" (September 19, 2005).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/sep2005/nichd-19b.htm

5. Bureau of Labor Statistics News Releases:

A. "American Time Use Survey: 2004 Results Announced by BLS" (September 20, 2005, ASCII text, HTML and .pdf format, 25p.).

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/atus.toc.htm

B. "Work at Home" (September 22, 2005, ASCII, HTML, and .pdf format, 14p.).

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/homey.toc.htm

6. Bureau of Justice Statistics Report: "Criminal Victimization, 2004," by Shannan M. Catalano (National Crime Victimization Survey, NCJ 210674, September 2005, ASCII and .pdf formats, 12p., with .zip compressed spreadsheets).

Abstract:

Presents estimates of national levels and rates of personal and property victimization for the year 2004. Rates and levels are provided for personal and property victimization by victim characteristics, type of crime, victim-offender relationship, use of weapons, and reporting to police. A special section is devoted to trends in victimization from 1993 to 2004. Estimates are from data collected using the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), an ongoing survey of households that interviews about 76,000 persons in 42,000 households twice annually. Violent crimes included in the report are rape/sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault and simple assault (from the NCVS), and homicide (from the FBI's UCR program). Property crimes examined are burglary, motor vehicle theft, and property theft.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/abstract/cv04.htm

7. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) Report: "Alternative Responses to Child Maltreatment: Findings from NCANDS," by Gila R. Shusterman, Dana Hollinshead, John D. FLuke, Ying-Ying T. Yuan, and Walter R. McDonald & Associates (July 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 61p.).

http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/05/child-maltreat-resp/index.htm

8. US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Report: "Rural America At A Glance, 2005," edited by Karen Hamrick (Economic Information Bulletin EIB4, September 2005, .pdf format, 6p.).

Abstract:

Rural America At A Glance, 2005 is a six-page brochure that highlights the most recent indicators of social and economic conditions in rural areas for use in developing policies and programs to assist rural areas. The brochure is the fourth in a series of reports that uses current social and economic data to highlight population, labor market, income, and poverty trends in rural areas. This brochure provides information on key rural conditions and trends for use by public and private decision makers and others in efforts to enhance the economic opportunities and quality of life for rural people and their communities.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/EIB4/
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Albania Institute of Statistics: "Albania in Figures" (2005, .pdf format, 60p.).

http://www.instat.gov.al/graphics/doc/downloads/shqiperia_ne%20shifra1.pdf
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Australia Bureau of Statistics: "Migration Australia: 2003-2004" (September 2005, .pdf format, 59p.). The report is linked to from an ABS media release: "3412.0 Proportion of Australians born overseas highest since Federation" (Sep. 20, 2005).

http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs%40.nsf/1.2.4/8E7B8A2B247C7EACCA25708100799BC5?OpenDocument

Click on "3412.0 2003-04" under "Publications" at the bottom of the page.
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Czech Statistical Office News Release: "Population of the Czech Republic in increase due to immigrants" (Sep. 22, 2005, Microsoft Word format). The news release links to 2 time series tables (Microsoft Excel and .pdf format): Vital Statistics of the Czech Republic: 2000-2005 (absolute and relative figures):

http://www.czso.cz/eng/csu.nsf/informace/aoby092205.doc

Click on "TIME SERIES" at the top of the news release for links to the tables.
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Statistics Denmark: _Statistical Yearbook 2005_ (2005, .pdf format).

http://www.dst.dk/HomeUK/Statistics/ofs/Publications/Yearbook/2005.aspx
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Greece National Statistics Service: "Greece in Figures 2005" (2005, .pdf format, 30p.).

http://www.statistics.gr/eng_tables/hellas_in_numbers_eng.pdf
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Japan Statistics Bureau: _Statistical Handbook of Japan 2005_ (2005, HTML and .pdf format, 210p.). "SHJ is designed to provide a clear and coherent overview of present-day Japan through statistics. It provides statistical tables, charts, and photographs to portray conditions in modern-day Japan from a variety of perspectives, including demographics, economic and social trends, and culture. Most of the comments and statistical data for this purpose have been drawn from principal statistical publications available from government and other leading sources. SHJ is published annually in August or September."

http://www.stat.go.jp/english/data/handbook/index.htm
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Statistics Lithuania: _Education 2004_ (June 2005, .pdf format, 107p.). " Data on public and private educational establishments, students enrolled and teaching staff. Virtually, it embraces information about pre-school establishments, general, vocational schools, colleges and universities. The number of pupils and students is shown by age, sex, educational attainment, field of study and continuation of education. To make international comparability of data possible, the breakdown of students enrolled by education level is presented in the issue. The publication is illustrated by diagrams and coloured maps."

http://www.std.lt/uploads/1120111680_47_Svietimas_2004.pdf
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Statistics South Africa:

A. "Marriages and Divorces 2002," Publication Amended (September 2005, .pdf format, 32p.).

http://www.statssa.gov.za/Publications/P0307/P03072002.pdf

B. "Marriages and Divorces 2003," Publication Amended (September 2005, .pdf format, 31p.).

http://www.statssa.gov.za/Publications/P0307/P03072003.pdf

C. "Labour force survey: September 2000 to March 2005" (September 26, 2005, .pdf format, 25p.).

http://www.statssa.gov.za/Publications/P0210/P0210September,March2000,2005.pdf
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United Kingdom:

1. Department of Health: "NHS Immunisation Statistics, England: 2004-05" (September 2005, .pdf format, 69p., with accompanying tables in Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.dh.gov.uk/PublicationsAndStatistics/Publications/PublicationsStatistics/PublicationsStatisticsArticle/fs/en?CONTENT_ID=4119649&chk=r6rlW4

2. "Office of the Deputy Prime Minister: "Causes of Homelessness Amongst Ethnic Minority Populations," by Marie-Claude Gervais and Hamid Rehman (September 2005, .pdf format, 120p.).

http://www.odpm.gov.uk/stellent/groups/odpm_homelessness/documents/divisionhomepage/041069.hcsp

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

Government Accountability Office Report: "No Child Left Behind Act: Education Could Do More to Help States Better Define Graduation Rates and Improve Knowledge About Intervention Strategies" (GAO-05-879, September 2005, .pdf format, 62p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05879.pdf

Note: This is a temporary addresses. GAO reports are always available at:

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gaoreports/index.html
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Institute of Medicine Report: "John R. La Montagne Memorial Symposium on Pandemic Influenza Research: Meeting Proceedings" (National Academy Press, 2005, OpenBook format, 214p.). Note: "The John R. La Montagne Memorial Symposium on Pandemic Influenza Research was held in April 2005 to discuss the current state of the art of research on pandemic influenza and to identify gaps in research. The symposium served as a first step of discussion towards a combined and coordinated research effort among Department of Health and Human Services agencies, other governmental agencies, international partners and the private sector."

http://www.iom.edu/report.asp?id=29768

Click on "Read and Purchase" for link to browsable monograph and purchasing information for a print copy.
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United Nations Children's Fund Report: "Investing in the Children of the Islamic World" (2005, .pdf format, 45p.).

Abstract:

Are we fulfilling our commitment to children? That is the question asked in Investing in the Children of the Islamic World,a new report of the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC), the Islamic Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (ISESCO) and UNICEF. The report reviews the situation of children in 57 Muslim countries, assesses progress in the areas of health, education, child protection and HIV/AIDS, and identifies necessary action. It will serve as a background document for the First Ministerial Conference on the Child, to be held in Rabat from 7-9 November 2005.

http://www.unicef.org/publications/index_28182.html
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Pan American Health Health Organization Fact Sheet, Report:

A. "Gender-Based Violence and HIV/AIDS," (September 20, 2005, .pdf format, 2p.).

Abstract:

This fact sheet provides an overview of the links between gender violence and HIV/AIDS and outlines the objectives of a joint GE y HIV Unit project on the topic.

http://www.paho.org/English/AD/GE/Viol-HIV_FS0705.pdf

B. "Immunization Coverage in the Americas, 1990-2004," (.pdf format).

Abstract:

Immunization coverage by country using BCG vaccine, DPT3 vaccine, Measles containing vaccine, and Polio3 vaccine in children less than 1 year or 1 year of age in the Region of the Americas, 1990-2004. Source: Data using country reports through country communications, EPI Tables and the PAHO-WHO/UNICEF joint reporting forms.

http://www.paho.org/English/AD/FCH/IM/EPI_CoverageTables.htm
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Urban Institute Articles:

A.. "Closing Doors on Americans' Housing Choices," by Margery Austin Turner and Carla Herbig (Sep. 18, 2005).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=900853

B. "Rebuilding after Katrina: Three Looming Issues," by Margery Austin Turner and Xavier de Souza Briggs (Sep. 23, 2005).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=900880
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Population Reference Bureau Periodical: _Population Bulletin_ (Vol. 60, No. 3, September 2005, .pdf format). The topic of this month's issue is the American Community Survey.

http://www.prb.org/pdf05/60.3The_American_Community.pdf
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_Public Opinion Quarterly_ Article Abstract: "Same-Gender Sex Among U.S. Adults: Trends Across the Twentieth Century and During the 1990s," by Charles F. Turner, Maria A. Villarroel, James R. Chromy, Elizabeth Eggleston, and Susan M. Rogers (Volume 69, Number 3, Fall 2005, p. 439-462).

http://poq.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/69/3/439
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_Economist_ Article: "Preparing for a pandemic," (Sep. 22, 2005).

http://www.economist.com/printedition/displayStory.cfm?Story_ID=4423927
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_British Medical Journal_ Book Review Extracts:

A. _Selling Sickness: How Drug Companies Are Turning Us All Into Patients_, by Ray Moynihan and Alan Cassels, reviewed by Michael Fitzpatrick (Vol. 331, No. 7518, Sep. 24, 2005, p. 701).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/331/7518/701

B. _Lovers and Livers: Disease Concepts in History_, by Jacalyn Duffin, reviewed by Judith Green (Vol. 331, No. 7518, Sep. 24, 2005, p. 702).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/331/7518/702
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Info Health Pop. Reporter: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (vol. 5, no. 39, Sep. 26, 2005). " The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

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WORKING PAPERS:

Institute for Research on Poverty (University of Wisconsin-Madison):

A. "Can We Improve Job Retention and Advancement among Low-Income Working Parents?," by Harry J. Holzer (Discussion Paper no. 1307-05, September 2005, 36p.).

Abstract:

In this paper we review the evidence on four approaches to improving job retention and advancement among low-income working adults: (1) financial incentives and supports; (2) case management and service provision, often by labor market intermediaries; (3) skill development strategies; and (4) employer-focused efforts, such as sectoral strategies and career ladder development at private firms. Within each category, we find at least some evidence of positive effects on retention or advancement. Among the most promising approaches are the use of labor market intermediaries for job placements, the use of community colleges for training, and a variety of efforts that involve local employers. Mixed strategies that combine strong financial incentives and supports with labor market services and training also show promise.

http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp130705.pdf

B. "Welfare-Induced Migration at State Borders: New Evidence from Micro-Data," by Terra McKinnish (Discussion Paper no. 1306-05, September 2005, 43p.).

Abstract:

This paper extends and synthesizes the various approaches used in the recent welfare migration literature to both offer the most comprehensive set of tests to date for welfare migration and to determine the relative importance of short-distance moves in welfare migration flows. The current study follows on the finding of McKinnish (2005) of welfare migration effects obtained by comparing welfare participation at state borders to state interiors. This identification strategy is extended to micro-data from the 1980 and 1990 Decennial Censuses and combined with the demographic comparisons used elsewhere in the welfare migration literature. While there are some exceptions, the results are largely consistent with the presence of welfare migration effects and the substantial importance of short-distance moves in welfare-induced migration flows.

http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp130605.pdf
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National Bureau of Economic Research: Note: NBER papers are available by individual or institutional subscription only. Check your organization's library for more information. "Smart Cities: Quality of Life, Productivity, and the Growth Effect of Human Capital," by Jesse M. Shapiro (w11615, September 2005, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

Between 1940 and 1990, a 10 percent increase in a metropolitan area's concentration of college-educated residents was associated with a .8 percent increase in subsequent employment growth. Instrumental variables estimates support a causal relationship between college graduates and employment growth, but show no evidence of an effect of high school graduates. Using data on growth in wages, rents and house values, I calibrate a neoclassical city growth model and find that roughly 60 percent of the employment growth effect of college graduates is due to enhanced productivity growth, the rest being caused by growth in the quality of life. This finding contrasts with the common argument that human capital generates employment growth in urban areas solely through changes in productivity.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11615
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Cornell Higher Education Research Institute [Ithaca, New York]:

A. "Reducing Inequality in Higher Education: Where Do We Go From Here?," by Ronald G. Ehrenberg (Prepared for the Conference on Economic Inequality and Higher Education: Access Persistence and Success, Syracuse University, September 23-24, 2005, .pdf format, 23p.).

http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/cheri/wp/cheri_wp79.pdf

B. "Title IX Compliance and Preference for Men in College Admissions," by James Monks (August 2005, .pdf format, 36p.).

Abstract:

Title IX has undoubtedly increased athletic opportunities for young high school and college women. What is less well understood is whether Title IX has had the unintended consequence of decreasing educational opportunities for young women relative to men. This paper examines the relationship between a university's compliance with Title IX via the proportionality standard and the subsequent admit rate difference by sex. I find that a lower proportionality measure, indicating a lack of Title IX compliance, results in an increase in preference for non-athlete males in college admissions.

http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/cheri/wp/cheri_wp80.pdf

C. "The Changing Nature of the Faculty and Faculty Employment Practices," by Ronald G. Ehrenberg (September 2005, prepared for the TIAA-CREF Institute Conference on "The New Balancing Act in Higher Education," New York NY, November 3-5, 2005, .pdf format, 23p.).

http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/cheri/wp/cheri_wp78.pdf
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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]:

A. "Immigrant Earnings: A Longitudinal Analysis," by Barry R. Chiswick, Yew Liang Lee, and Paul W. Miller (Discussion Paper 1750, September 2005, .pdf format, 47p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Australia to analyze the determinants of the level and growth in earnings of adult male immigrants in their first 3.5 years in Australia. The theoretical framework is based on the immigrant adjustment model, which incorporates both the transferability of immigrant skills and selectively in migration. The cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses generate similar findings. The level and relative growth of earnings are higher for immigrants with higher levels of skill and who are economic/skills tested migrants, as distinct from family based and refugee migrants. The analysis indicates that immigrant economic assimilation does occur and that in these data the cross-section provides a good estimate of the longitudinal progress of immigrants. The findings are robust across statistical techniques.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1750.pdf

B. "Building the Family Nest: Pre-Marital Investments, Marriage Markets and Spousal Allocations," by Murat Iyigun and Randall P. Walsh (Discussion Paper 1752, September 2005, .pdf format, 32p.).

Abstract:

We develop a model of the household in which spousal incomes are determined by pre-marital investments, the marriage market is characterized by assortative matching, and endogenously-determined sharing rules form the basis of intra-household allocations. By incorporating pre-marital investments and spousal matching into the collective household model, we are able to identify the fundamental determinants of endogenously determined and maritally sustainable intra-marital sharing rules. In particular, we find that all sharing rules along the assortative order support unconditionally efficient outcomes where both pre-marital investments and intra-household allocations are efficient. The efficiency of both pre-marital choices and household allocations then enables us to show that, for each couple, the marriage market generates a unique and maritally sustainable sharing rule that is a function of the distribution of pre-marital endowments and the sex ratios in the market.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1752.pdf

C. "How Important Is Homeland Education for Refugees' Economic Position in The Netherlands?" by Joop Hartog and Aslan Zorlu (Discussion Paper 1753, September 2005, .pdf format, 28p.).

Abstract:

We use data on refugees admitted to the Netherlands that include registration of education in their homeland by immigration officers. Such data are seldom available. We investigate the quality and reliability of the registrations and then use them to assess effects on refugees' economic position during the first five years after arrival. The most remarkable finding is the absence of returns to higher education.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1753.pdf

D. "Computer Skills, Destination Language Proficiency and the Earnings of Natives and Immigrants," by Barry R. Chiswick, Paul W. Miller (Discussion Paper 1755, September 2005, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and Housing in Australia, this paper investigates the determinants, and consequences for earnings, of computer use by both the native born and the foreign born. Focussing on the foreign born, the multivariate analyses show that recent arrivals are more likely to use computers than the Australian born. As the level of computer use in Australia is much higher than in most of the countries that Australia's immigrants come from, this evidence suggests a high degree of favorable selection in migration. Study of the links between earnings, computer use and other human capital skills shows that educational attainment and destination language skills are complements to computer use. The use of a computer is shown to be a way the foreign born can increase the international transferability of their pre-immigration skills, a finding that has implications for immigrant settlement policies.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1755.pdf

E. "Work and Family: Marriage, Children, Child Gender and the Work Hours and Earnings of West German Men," Hyung-Jai Choi, Jutta M. Joesch, and Shelly Lundberg (Discussion Paper No. 1761, September 2005, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract:

We find a strong association between family status and labor market outcomes for recent cohorts of West German men in the German Socio-Economic Panel. Living with a partner and living with a child both have substantial positive effects on earnings and work hours. These effects persist in fixed effects models that control for correlation in time-invariant unobservables that affect both family and work outcomes. Child gender also matters--a first son increases fathers' work hours by 100 hours per year more than a first daughter. There is evidence of son " preference" in the probability that a German man is observed to be coresiding with a son or a daughter. Men are more likely to remain in the same household with a male child than a female child and girls are underrepresented in the raw data. Controlling for selective attrition in our labor supply model reveals that men who remain with female children are strongly positively selected (in terms of their work hours) relative to men who remain with male children.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1761.pdf

F. "Educational Qualifications and Wage Inequality: Evidence for Europe," by Santiago Budria and Pedro T. Pereira (Discussion Paper No. 1763, September 2005, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

This paper explores the connection between education and wage inequality in nine European countries. We exploit the quantile regression technique to calculate returns to lower secondary, upper secondary and tertiary education at different points of the wage distribution. We find that returns to tertiary education are highly increasing when moving from the lower to the upper quantiles. This finding suggests that an educational expansion towards tertiary education is expected, ceteris paribus, to increase overall wage inequality through the within-dimension. Returns to secondary education are more homogeneous across quantiles, thus suggesting that an educational expansion towards secondary education is expected to have a more limited impact on within-groups dispersion. Using data from the last decades, we assess how the impact of education on wage inequality has evolved over time. We detect different trends across countries. A common feature is that the inequality increasing effect of tertiary education became more acute over the last years.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1763.pdf

G. "Gender Discrimination Estimation in a Search Model with Matching and Bargaining," by Luca Flabbi (Discussion Paper No. 1764, September 2005, .pdf format, 60p.).

Abstract:

Gender wage differentials, conditional on observed productivity characteristics, have been considered a possible indication of prejudice against women in the labor market. However, there is no conclusive evidence on whether these differentials are due to labor market discrimination or to unobserved productivity differences. The objective of this paper is to propose a solution for this identification problem by developing and estimating a search model of the labor market with matching, bargaining and employers' taste discrimination. In equilibrium all types of employers wage discriminate women: prejudiced employers because of preference and unprejudiced employers because of spillover effects that worsen the bargaining position of women. Estimation is performed by maximum likelihood on Current Population Survey data for the year 1995. Results indicate that the productivity of women is 6.5% lower than the productivity of men and that about half of the employers are prejudiced against women. Three policy experiments are implemented using the estimated parameters: an equal pay policy, an affirmative action policy and a wage differential decomposition that takes into account equilibrium effects.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1764.pdf
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United Nations University World Institute for Development Economics Research (WIDER):

A. "Out of School and (Probably) in Work: Child Labour and Capability Deprivation in India," by D. Jayaraj and S. Subramanian (Research Paper No. 2005/55, August 2005, .pdf format, 31p.).

Abstract:

This paper explores the hypothesis that the phenomenon of child labour is explicable in terms of poverty that compels a household to keep its children out of school and put them to work in the cause of the household's survival. In exploring the link between child labour and poverty in the Indian context, the paper advances the view that the nature of the connection is more readily apprehended if both the variables under study are defined more expansively and inclusively than is customarily the case. Specifically, the suggestion is that it may be realistic to include those children who are conventionally categorized as "non-workers not attending school" within the count of child labourers. It is also suggested that poverty is meaningfully measured in terms of a multi-dimensional approach to the problem, wherein the aim is to assess generalized capability failure--arising from want of access to elementary infrastructural facilities and essential amenities--with respect to a number of basic human functionings. The core of the paper's argument is presented by means of a simple analytical model of child labour and deprivation, and the issues emerging from it are studied in the Indian context with the support of both primary and secondary data.

http://www.wider.unu.edu/publications/rps/rps2005/rp2005-55.pdf

B. "Poverty and the Welfare Costs of Risk Associated with Globalization," by Ethan Ligon (Research Paper No. 2005/57, September 2005, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

"Globalization" implies change, and uncertainty over future change may affect household welfare. We use data on Lorenz curves over the last fifty years for a sample of 53 (mostly developing) countries. Treating each country-quintile-year as an observation, we first account for variation in consumption expenditures, finding that global shocks are of less importance than country-level shocks in explaining variation in country-quintile consumption growth. While poorer households experience more rapid consumption growth than do wealthier households, they also bear much more risk. However, we find no evidence that this greater risk is related to globalization.

http://www.wider.unu.edu/publications/rps/rps2005/rp2005-57.pdf

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "advanced search"
C. Type in your publication name and click "Exact title" radio button
D. Under "Show", click the "fax/ariel" radio button.
E. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

Economic Development and Cultural Change (Vol. 53, No. 4, 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Elite database. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.
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Other Journals:

AIDS (Vol. 19, No. 15, Oct. 14, 2005).

http://www.aidsonline.com/pt/re/aids/toc.00002030-200510140-00000.htm

American Journal of Public Health (Vol. 95, No. 10, October 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

http://www.ajph.org/content/vol95/issue10/

European Journal of Population (Vol. 21 No. 2-3, June 2005). Note: This is a special issue on "The Demography of Conflict and Violence."

www.kluweronline.com/issn/0168-6577/contents

European Journal of Public Health (Vol. 15, No. 4, August 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

http://eurpub.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol15/issue4/index.dtl

International Journal for Quality in Health Care (Vol. 17, No. 5, October 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://intqhc.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol17/issue5/index.dtl

Medical Care (Vol. 43, No. 10, October 2005).

http://www.lww-medicalcare.com/pt/re/medcare/toc.00005650-200510000-00000.htm

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DATA:

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Census of Population and Housing, 2000 [United States]: Special Tabulation on Aging (#13577)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-CDROM/13577.xml

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Generalized Anxiety Disorder (Subject), Wave 2, 1997-2000 (#13625)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/13625.xml

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Major Depressive Disorder (Subject), Wave 2, 1997-2000 (#13637)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/13637.xml

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Oppositional Defiance Disorder (Primary Caregiver), Wave 2, 1997-2000 (#13640)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/13640.xml

For a complete list of all ICPSR new releases in the last 90 days, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/access/recent.html

Click on "list".

Additions are marked "*new*".

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WEBSITES OF INTEREST:

kaiserEDU.org Additions: kaiserEDU.org, originally discussed in the CDERR issue No. 26 (Apr. 5, 2004--http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cde/library/cderr/cderr26.htm#websites) has recently added the following issue module and tutorial:

A. U.S. Health Care Costs (issue module):

http://www.kaiseredu.org/topics_im.asp?imID=1&parentID=61&id=358

B. Counting the Uninsured (Tutorial), by Catherine Hoffman (August 2005, video and audio tutorial, running time, 15 minutes, 1 second, with accompanying slide show (Microsoft PowerPoint format).

http://www.kaiseredu.org/tutorials_index.asp

Click on the links below "Counting the Uninsured".

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu