Current Demographic Research Report #101, September 19, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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Index to this issue:

REPORTS, ARTICLES, COMPENDIUMS

Census Bureau Compilation, Report, Facts for Features
National Center for Health Statistics Report
National Institutes of Health News Release
CDC Periodicals
_MMWR_ Article
Institute of Medicine Monograph
National Center for Education Statistics
Government Accountability Office Reports
Population Council Report
Kaiser Family Foundation Report
Urban Institute Report
National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University Report
The Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy [SUNY Buffalo] Reports
UNESCAP Periodical
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Report
Healthcare Commission [UK] Report
_American Psychologist_ Article
_New England Journal of Medicine_ Article Abstract
_British Medical Journal_ Editorial Extract
_PNAS_ Article Abstract
Info Health Pop. Reporter
National Longitudinal Surveys Bibliography Updates

WORKING PAPERS

University of Michigan Population Studies Center
Bureau of Labor Statistics
National Bureau of Economic Research [NBER]
Maxwell School: Syracuse University Center for Policy Research
World Bank Policy Research Programme
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Luxembourg Income Study
Academy for Migration Studies in Denmark
Equal Opportunities Commission [UK]

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta
Other Journals

CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS

East-West Center
International Conference on Space and Time in Historical Demographic Studies

DATA

ICPSR
UK Data Archive

WEBSITES OF INTEREST

Social Science Resource Council: Understanding Katrina
Kaiser Family Foundation

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REPORTS, ARTICLES, NEWS RELEASES, ETC.

Census Bureau Compilation, Report, Facts for Features:

A. "Hurricane & Tropical Storm Information: Hurricane Katrina" (compiled from various Census Bureau Sources, September 2005).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2005/katrina.htm

B. "What It's Worth: Field of Training and Economic Status in 2001," by Camille L. Ryan (Household Economic Studies P70-98, September 2005, .pdf format, 16p.). "This report uses data collected in the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) in June through September of 2001."

http://www.census.gov/prod/2005pubs/p70-98.pdf

C. "Veterans Day 2005: Nov. 11" (Facts for Features CB05-FF.17, Sep. 15, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 2p.).

HTML:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/005696.html

.pdf:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2005/cb05ff17.pdf
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National Center for Health Statistics Report: "Sexual Behavior and Selected Health Measures: Men and Women 15-44 Years of Age, United States, 2002," by William D. Mosher, Anjani Chandra, and Jo Jones (Advance Data No. 362, September 2005, .pdf format, 56p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/pubs/pubd/ad/361-370/ad362.htm
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National Institutes of Health News Release: "Researchers Discover How Compounds Prevent Viruses From Entering Cells," (September 19, 2005).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/sep2005/nichd-19a.htm
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Centers for Disease Control Periodicals:

A. _Preventing Chronic Disease_ (Vol. 2, No. 4, October 2005, HTML and .pdf format). Note: This issue is a special focus issue on health disparity.

http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2005/oct/toc.htm

B. Centers for Disease Control Periodical: _Emerging Infectious Diseases_ (Vol. 11, No. 10, October 2005 HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/index.htm

Note: This is a temporary address. When the next _EID_ is released, this one, along with all others, will be available at:

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/pastcon.htm
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_MMWR_ Article: "Update: Influenza Activity --- United States and Worldwide, May 22--September 3, 2005, and 2005--06 Season Vaccination Recommendations" (Centers for Disease Control, _Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 54, No. 36, Sep. 16, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, p. 899-902.

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5436a3.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5436.pdf
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Institute of Medicine Monographs:

A. _Estimating the Contributions of Lifestyle-Related Factors to Preventable Death: A Workshop Summary_ (IOM Planning Committee on Estimating the Contributions of Lifestyle-Related Factors to Preventable Death, 2005, OpenBook and .pdf format, 71p.). Note: Ordering information for a print copy is available at the site.

http://www.nap.edu/catalog/11323.html

B. "The Smallpox Vaccination Program: Public Health in an Age of Terrorism," edited by Alina Baciu, Andrea Pernack Anason, Kathleen Stratton, and Brian Strom (2005, OpenBook format, 392p.). Note: Ordering information for a print or .pdf copy is available at the site.

http://www.nap.edu/catalog/11240.html
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National Center for Education Statistics Reports:

A. "The Nation's Report Card: Mathematics 2003," by James S. Braswell, Gloria S. Dion, Mary C. Daane, and Ying Jin (September 2005, .pdf format, 258p.).

Abstract:

This report presents results of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2003 fourth- and eighth-grade mathematics assessments for the nation, for participating states and other jurisdictions, and for participating urban districts. Assessment results are described in terms of students' average mathematics score on a 0-500 scale and in terms of the percentage of students attaining each of three achievement levels: Basic, Proficient, and Advanced. National and district-level scores at different percentiles on the scale (indicating the percentage of students whose scores fell below a particular point) are also discussed. This report also provides results for subgroups of students defined by various background characteristics (e.g., gender, race/ethnicity, and students' eligibility for free/reduced-price lunch). Comparisons are made to results from previous years in which the assessment was administered. In addition to the 2003 results, national results are reported from the 1990, 1992, 1996, and 2000 assessments. Results for states and other jurisdictions are also reported from the 1990 (eighth grade only), 1992, 1996, 2000, and 2003 assessments. Results for participating urban districts are reported for 2003. The results from the assessment showed higher national average mathematics scores in 2003 than in all the previous assessment years at both grades 4 and 8. All 42 of the states and jurisdictions that participated in both the 1992 and 2003 fourth-grade assessments had a higher average mathematics score in 2003. Each of the 38 states and jurisdictions that participated in the both the 1990 and 2003 eighth-grade assessments had a higher average score in 2003. The report also includes sample assessment questions and examples of student responses. Appendices include information on national, state, and district samples, school and student participation rates, participation and accommodation of students with disabilities and/or limited-English-proficient students, subgrouppercentages, and state-level contextual variables.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005451

B. "The Nation's Report Card: Reading 2003," by Patricia L. Donahue, Mary C. Daane, and Ying Jin (September 2005, .pdf format, 268p.).

Abstract:

This report presents results of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2003 fourth- and eighth-grade reading assessments for the nation, for participating states and other jurisdictions, and for participating urban districts. Assessment results are described in terms of students' average reading score on a 0-500 scale and in terms of the percentage of students attaining each of three achievement levels: Basic, Proficient, and Advanced. National and district-level scores at different percentiles on the scale (indicating the percentage of students whose scores fell below a particular point) are also discussed. This report also provides results for subgroups of students defined by various background characteristics (e.g., gender, race/ethnicity, and students' eligibility for free/reduced-price lunch). Comparisons are made to results from previous years in which the assessment was administered. In addition to the 2003 results, national results are reported from the 1992, 1994, 1998, 2000 (fourth grade only), and 2002 assessments. Results for participating states and other jurisdictions are also reported from the 1992, 1994, 1998, and 2002 assessments at grade 4 and from the 1998 and 2002 assessments at grade 8. Results for participating urban districts are reported for 2002 and 2003. The national results from the assessment showed no measurable difference between the average fourth-grade reading score in 2003 and the score in 1992. The average eighth-grade reading score was higher in 2003 than in 1992. Of the 42 states and jurisdictions that participated in both the 1992 and 2003 fourth-grade reading assessments, 13 showed increases in average scores and 5 showed declines. Of the 39 states and jurisdictions that participated in the 1998 and 2003 eighth-grade assessments, 8 showed increases in average reading scores and 7 showed declines. The report also includes sample assessment questions and examples of student responses. Appendices include information on national, state, and district samples, school and student participation rates, participation and accommodation of students with disabilities and/or limited-English-proficient students, subgroup percentages, state-level contextual variables, and sample texts from the NAEP 2003 reading assessment.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005453
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Government Accountability Office Reports: "TANF: State Approaches to Screening for Domestic Violence Could Benefit from HHS Guidance," (August 2005, .pdf format, 42p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05701.pdf

Note: These are temporary addresses. GAO reports are always available at:

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gaoreports/index.html
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Population Council Report: "Women's participation in disaster relief and recovery," by Ayse Yonder with Sengul Akcar and Prema Gopalan (_SEEDS_ No. 22, Sep. 2005, .pdf format, 37p.).

http://www.popcouncil.org/pdfs/seeds/Seeds22.pdf
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Kaiser Family Foundation Survey Reports, Report:

A. "Employer Health Benefits 2005 Annual Survey," (September 14, 2005). A summary of the survey findings and a chart pack are available in .pdf format.

http://www.kff.org/insurance/7315/

A webcast (video plus print transcript) of featuring more information from the Survey can be found at:

http://www.kaisernetwork.org/health_cast/hcast_index.cfm?display=detail&hc=1503

B. "Survey of Hurricane Katrina Evacuees" (September 2005, Toplines and methodology, .pdf format, 21p.).

C. "Addressing the Health Care Impact of Hurricane Katrina" (Medicaid and the Unisured Policy Brief, September 2005, .pdf format, 10p.).

Both "B." and "C," along with other Hurricane Katrina resources, can be accessed from:

http://www.kff.org/katrina/

D. "Employer Health Benefits 2005 Annual Survey" (September 2005, Summary of Findings, .pdf format, 8p., Chartpack, .pdf format, 40p.). There is also a link to an online version of the survey summary. "This annual survey of employers provides a detailed look at trends in employer-based health coverage, including changes in premiums, employee contributions, cost sharing policies and other relevant information. This year the survey also documented the prevalence of high-deductible health plans and savings account options, including the percentage of employers offering these plan types and the percentage of workers covered by them. The 2005 survey included 2,995 randomly selected public and private firms with three or more employees (2,013 of which responded to the full survey and 982 of which responded to an additional question about offering coverage). The Kaiser Family Foundation and the Health Research and Educational Trust jointly conduct the survey."

http://www.kff.org/insurance/7315/index.cfm
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Urban Institute Report, Viewpoint:

A. "Chicago Communities and Prisoner Reentry," by Christy Visher and Jill Farrell (September 06, 2005, .pdf format, 16p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311225

B. Katrina Could Help the Poor," by Sheila R. Zedlewski (Viewpoint, Sep. 14, 2005).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=900840
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National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University Report: "The Importance of Family Dinners II," (September 2005, .pdf format, 16p.).

http://www.casacolumbia.org/Absolutenm/articlefiles/380-2005_family_dinners_ii_final.pdf

More information on NCASA:

http://www.casacolumbia.org/absolutenm/templates/article.asp?articleid=276&zoneid=1
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Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy [State University of New York at Buffalo] Conference Papers: Selected conference papers from "Military Culture and Gender," a conference held in Buffalo, New York Sep. 15-16, 2005 (.pdf format) are available from the conference website. Additional abstracts are also available.

http://www.law.buffalo.edu/baldycenter/military05.htm
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United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Periodical: _Asia-Pacific Population Journal_ (Vol. 20, No. 1, 2005, .pdf format).

http://www.unescap.org/publications/detail.asp?id=1097
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_American Psychologist_ Article: "The Gender Similarities Hypothesis," by Janet Shibley Hyde (September 2005, .pdf format, p. 581-592).

Abstract:

The differences model, which argues that males and females are vastly different psychologically, dominates the popular media. Here, the author advances a very different view, the gender similarities hypothesis, which holds that males and females are similar on most, but not all, psychological variables. Results from a review of 46 meta-analyses support the gender similarities hypothesis. Gender differences can vary substantially in magnitude at different ages and depend on the context in which measurement occurs. Overinflated claims of gender differences carry substantial costs in areas such as the workplace and relationships.

http://www.apa.org/releases/gendersim0905.html

Click on the link below "Full Text of the Article"
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Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Report: "A Picture of Australia's Children: Selected Highlights," (September 2005, .pdf format, 119p.).

Abstract:

A Picture of Australia's Children is the third national statistical report on the health, development and wellbeing of Australia's children aged 0-14 years. Childhood, particularly early childhood, has become a key priority for governments and non-government organisations across Australia. This is in response to emerging issues of concern for Australia's children in the context of rapid social change, as well as compelling evidence about the importance of the early years for laying the foundations for children's future competence and physical and mental wellbeing. This report has been broadened to bring together a wide variety of data, including information about individual, family and societal factors that influence the health, development and wellbeing of children. New topics include: exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, homelessness, literacy and numeracy, children as victims of violence, neighbourhood safety and parental health and disability.

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10127
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Healthcare Commission [UK] Report: "Survey of users of mental health services 2005," (Sep. 12, 2005, .pdf format, 22p., Appendices, .pdf format, 23p., links to benchmark reports for each NHS trust, .pdf format, with tables in Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.healthcarecommission.org.uk/NationalFindings/Surveys/PatientSurveys/fs/en?CONTENT_ID=4018286&chk=F5hJwR

More information about Healthcare Commission:

http://www.healthcarecommission.org.uk/AboutUs/fs/en
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_New England Journal of Medicine_ Article Abstract: "Major Causes of Death among Men and Women in China," by Jiang He, Dongfeng Gu, Xigui Wu, Kristi Reynolds, Xiufang Duan, Chonghua Yao, Jialiang Wang, Chung-Shiuan Chen, Jing Chen, Rachel P. Wildman, Michael J. Klag, and Paul K. Whelton (Vol. 353, No. 11, Sept. 15, 2005, p. 1124-1134).

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/abstract/353/11/1124
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_British Medical Journal_ Editorial Extract: "Bridging the equity gap in maternal and child health," by Zulfiqar A. Bhutta (Vol. 331, No. 7517, p. 585-586).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/331/7517/585
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_Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences_ Article Abstract: "A model of antibiotic-resistant bacterial epidemics in hospitals," by Glenn F. Webb, Erika M.C. D'Agata, Pierre Magal, and Shigui Ruan (Vol. 102, No. 37, September 13, 2005, p. 13343-13348).

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/102/37/13343
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Info Health Pop. Reporter: Info Health Pop. Reporter: Info Health Pop.
Reporter: Info for Health Pop. Reporter: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (vol. 5, no. 38, Sep. 19, 2005). " The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/
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National Longitudinal Surveys Bibliography Updates: Note: These citations, along with all of the NLS bibliography, can be found at:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/

Note: Where available, direct links to full text have been provided. These references represent updated citations from Sep. 12-Sept. 16, 2005.

For more information on any of these citations (selected abstracts are available) go to the above listed address and click on "Title List". Click on the first item, which will give the syntax of the citation urls:

http://www.nlsbibliography.org/qtitle.php3?myrow[0]=320

Then change the number after the equal sign (320 in this case) to the number listed as the "ID Number" in the citations below. You will be taken to the full citation listing.

SMITH, PATRICIA K.
BOGIN, BARRY
BISHAI, DAVID M.
Are Time Preference and Body Mass Index Associated? Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Economics and Human Biology 3,2 (July 2005): 259-270
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 5099
Publisher: Elsevier Science

ZAGORSKY, JAY L.
Health and Wealth: The Late-20th Century Obesity Epidemic in the U.S.
Economics and Human Biology 3,2 (July 2005): 296-313
Cohort(s): NLSY79
ID Number: 5100
Publisher: Elsevier Science

CLASSEN, TIMOTHY
HOKAYEM, CHARLES
Childhood Influences of Youth Obesity
Economics and Human Biology 3,2 (July 2005): 165-187
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
ID Number: 5101
Publisher: Elsevier Science

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WORKING PAPERS:

University of Michigan Population Studies Center: "The Impact of Past Conflicts and Social Disruption in Cambodia on the Current Generation of Older Adults," by Zachary S. Zimmer, John E. Knodel, Kiry Sovan Kim, and Sina Puch (PSC Research Report No. 05-582, September 2005, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract:

Cambodia experienced civil strife, political violence and widespread killings during the rule of the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Many who died were children or spouses of today's older-aged population. The post Khmer Rouge period was characterized by severe social dislocation and continuing conflict resulting in further losses of children and spouses. There is the possibility that these events eroded the base of core family support for older adults in a country where formal channels of assistance are virtually absent. This paper links two areas within demographic study that having been gaining increased attention in recent years, the consequences of conflict and violence and aging in developing countries, by examining the extent to which current Cambodian elderly experienced deaths to children, spouses, forced migration, and family separation, during the Khmer Rouge period, and the extent to which deaths to children and spouses during the war impact on indicators that are commonly used to measure the welfare of older-adults, specifically, those related to the living arrangements, support and material well-being. Data come from a 2004 representative survey of persons aged 60+ in an area covering over half of Cambodia's population and including Phnom Penh. Results indicate that the influence of the war was widespread. More than one in four surviving older adults in Cambodia report that a child of theirs died due to violent causes during the Khmer Rouge period, and more than one in five report death to multiple children. An interesting, and potentially striking, and on the surface counterintuitive, conclusion is that the impact of deaths to children and spouses are somewhat modest. The reasons for this, elucidated in the conclusion of this paper, include high fertility among the current generation of older adults in Cambodia, the probability that losses during the war depended on family size at the time, and the pervasiveness of poverty in the country today.

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.html?ID=3674

Click on PDF icon for link to full text.
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California Center for Population Research [UCLA]: "Asians and Pacific Islanders in Same-Sex Couples in California," by Gary Gates and R. Bradley Sears (CCPR-021-05, Sept. 2005, .pdf format, 24p.).

Abstract:

Using data from Census 2000, this report provides demographic and socio-economic information about Asians and Pacific Islanders in same-sex couples in California. In this report, the category "API couples" means couples where both members are Asian or Pacific Islander; "inter-ethnic couples" means couples where only one member is Asian or Pacific Islander; and "non-API couples" indicates couples where neither member is Asian or Pacific Islander.

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/ccpr_021_05.asp

Click on "Full Text" at the bottom of the page for link to full text.
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Bureau of Labor Statistics: "Proposed Category System for 1960-2000 Census Occupations," by Peter B. Meyer and Anastasiya M. Osborne (WP383, September 2005, .pdf format, 67p.).

Abstract:

This paper proposes a detailed, consistent category system for occupations in the Census of Population data from 1960 to 2000. Most of the categories are based on the 1990 Census occupation definitions. We analyze employment levels, average earnings levels, and earnings variance in our occupation categories over time, compare these to similar trends for occupations defined in the occ1950 IPUMS classification, and test both classifications for consistency over time.

http://www.bls.gov/ore/abstract/ec/ec050090.htm
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National Bureau of Economic Research [NBER]. Note: NBER papers are available by individual or institutional subscription only. Check your organization's library for more information.

A. "Workplace Segregation in the United States: Race, Ethnicity, and Skill," by Judith Hellerstein and David Neumark (w11599, September 2005, .pdf format, 35p.).

Abstract:

We study workplace segregation in the United States using a unique matched employer-employee data set that we have created. We present measures of workplace segregation by education and language-as skilled workers may be more complementary with other skilled workers than with unskilled workers-and by race and ethnicity, using simulation methods to measure segregation beyond what would occur randomly as workers are distributed across establishments. We also assess the role of education- and language-related skill differentials in generating workplace segregation by race and ethnicity, as skill is often correlated with race and ethnicity. Finally, we attempt to distinguish between segregation by skill based on general crowding of unskilled poor English speakers into a narrow set of jobs, and segregation based on common language for reasons such as complementarity among workers speaking the same language. Our results indicate that there is considerable segregation by education and language in the workplace. Racial segregation in the workplace is of the same order of magnitude as education segregation, and segregation between Hispanics and whites is larger yet. Only a tiny portion of racial segregation in the workplace is driven by education differences between blacks and whites, but a substantial fraction of ethnic segregation in the workplace can be attributed to differences in language proficiency.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11599

B. "Do Accountability and Voucher Threats Improve Low-Performing Schools?" by David N. Figlio and Cecilia Rouse (w11597, September 2005, .pdf format, 52p.).

Abstract:

In this paper we study the effects of the threat of school vouchers and school stigma in Florida on the performance of "low-performing" schools using student-level data from a subset of districts. Estimates of the change in school-level high-stakes test scores from the first year of the reform are consistent with the early results used by the state of Florida to claim large-scale improvements associated with the threat of voucher assignment. However, we also find that much of this estimated effect may be due to other factors. While we estimate a small relative improvement in reading scores on the high-stakes test for voucher-threatened/stigmatized schools, we estimate a much smaller relative improvement on a lower-stakes, nationally norm-referenced, test. Further, the relative gains in reading scores are explained largely by changing student characteristics. We find more evidence for a positive differential effect on math test scores on both the low- and highstakes tests, however, the results from the lower-stakes test appear primarily limited to students in the high-stakes grade. Finally, we find some evidence that the relative improvements following the introduction of the A Plan by low-performing schools were more due to the stigma of receiving the low grade rather than the threat of vouchers.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11597

C. "Endogenous Fertility, Mortality and Economic Growth: Can a Malthusian Framework Account for the Conflicting Historical Trends in Population?" by Isaac Ehrlich and Jinyoung Kim (w11590, September 2005, .pdf format, 31p.).

Abstract:

The 19th century economist, Thomas Robert Malthus, hypothesized that the long-run supply of labor is completely elastic at a fixed wage-income level because population growth tends to outstrip real output growth. Dynamic equilibrium with constant income and population is achieved through equilibrating adjustments in "positive checks" (mortality, starvation) and "preventive checks" (marriage, fertility). Developing economies since the Industrial Revolution, and more recently especially Asian economies, have experienced steady income growth accompanied by sharply falling fertility and mortality rates. We develop a dynamic model of endogenous fertility, longevity, and human capital formation within a Malthusian framework that allows for diminishing returns to labor but also for the role of human capital as an engine of growth. Our model accounts for economic stagnation with high fertility and mortality and constant population and income, as predicted by Malthus, but also for takeoffs to a growth regime and a demographic transition toward low fertility and mortality rates, and a persistent growth in per-capita income.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11590

D. "Insurance and Innovation in Health Care Markets," by Darius Lakdawalla and Neeraj Sood (w11602, September 2005, .pdf format, p.).

Abstract:

Innovation policy often involves an uncomfortable trade-off between rewarding innovators sufficiently and providing the innovation at the lowest possible price. However, in health care markets with insurance for innovative goods, society may be able to ensure efficient rewards for inventors and the efficient dissemination of inventions. Health insurance resembles a two-part pricing contract in which a group of consumers pay an up-front fee ex ante in exchange for a fixed unit price ex post. This functions as if innovators themselves wrote efficient two-part pricing contracts, where they extracted sufficient profits from the ex ante payment, but still sold the good ex post at marginal cost. As a result, we show that complete, efficient, and competitive health insurance for innovative products - such as new drugs, medical devices, or patented procedures - can lead to perfectly efficient innovation and utilization, even when moral hazard exists. Conversely, incomplete insurance markets in this context lead to inefficiently low levels of innovation. Moreover, optimally designed public health insurance for innovative products can solve the innovation problem by charging ex ante premia equal to consumer surplus, and ex post co-payments at or below marginal cost. When these quantities are unknown, society can usually improve static and dynamic welfare by covering the uninsured with contracts that mimic observed private insurance contracts.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11602
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Maxwell School: Syracuse University Center for Policy Research: "An Empirical Model of Labor Supply with Social Interactions," by Andrew Grodner and Thomas Kniesner (Working Paper No. 69, September 2005, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

Our research econometrically tests the presence of social interactions in the labor supply model. The interdependence is defined as a response of individual's hours worked to the mean hours worked in one's reference group. The reference group includes individuals who share similar age, family structures, and location, all of which jointly determine the economic distance that reflects the cost of interactions. We identify an endogenous social interactions effect by instrumenting for the variable representing the mean hours worked of the people in an individual's reference group with the mean hours worked of the individuals in the adjacent reference groups. Estimates of the linear labor supply model proposed in the literature using Panel Study of Income Dynamics data indicate the presence of positive and non-negligible spillovers in hours worked. The total wage elasticity of labor supply is 0.22, where 0.08 is due the exogenous wage change, and 0.14 is due to social interactions

http://www-cpr.maxwell.syr.edu/cprwps/wps69abs.htm
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World Bank Policy Research Programme: "Micro-level estimation of child malnutrition indicators and its application in Cambodia," by Tomoki Fujii (WPS3662, July 2005, ASCII text and .pdf format, (61p.).

Abstract:

One of the major limitations in addressing child malnutrition is lack of information that could be used to target resources. By combining demographic and health survey (DHS) and population census data, the author disaggregates the estimates of the prevalence of child malnutrition in Cambodia from currently available 17 DHS strata into 1,594 communes. The methodology is built on the small-area estimation technique developed by Elbers, Lanjouw, and Lanjouw. The author extends it to jointly estimate multiple indicators and to allow for a richer structure of error terms. Average standard errors for the commune-level estimates in this study were about 4 percent, a magnitude comparable to those for stratum-level estimates derived from DHS only. The author demonstrates three applications of these estimates. First, he explores the relationship between malnutrition, consumption poverty, and inequality. The nonlinear effects of consumption on nutritional status of children are a key component of the relationship. Second, he conducts a decomposition analysis of health inequality and finds that the between-location share of health inequality is lower than with consumption inequality. Finally, he evaluates the potential gains from geographic targeting. The author finds that the savings in the cost of a nutrition program from commune-level targeting is on average at least two to three times higher than that from stratum-level targeting when the per capita cost of the program is fixed.

http://econ.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64165259&theSitePK=469382&piPK=64165421&menuPK=64166093&entityID=000016406_20050711101606

Link to full text is at the bottom of the abstract.
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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA):

A. "Does Economic Uncertainty Affect the Decision to Bear Children? Evidence from East and West Germany," by Sumon Bhaumik and Jeffrey B. Nugent (Discussion Paper No. 1746, September 2005, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

Although economic agents routinely face various types of economic uncertainty, their effects are often unclear and hard to assess, in part due to the absence of suitable measures of uncertainty. Because of the numerous and very substantial institutional changes that people in the transition economies of Central and Eastern Europe experienced during the last two decades, these countries are excellent candidates for examining the effects of uncertainties on various kinds of behavior. During their periods of uncertainty, moreover, these countries have experienced sharply falling fertility rates. Some have argued that these two phenomena are linked but others have remained skeptical in view of the fact that the evidence is largely confined to the macro level. This paper demonstrates the existence of such a link at the micro level using two different types of uncertainty measures based on GSOEP data from Eastern (and for comparison purposes also Western) Germany for the years 1992-2002. The results suggest that employment uncertainty (but not financial uncertainty) was considerably greater in Eastern Germany during its transition than in Western Germany and had a highly nonlinear effect on the probability of a birth in any period. The result is rather robust to differences in specification and suggests that the higher employment uncertainty in East Germany in the transition could have contributed significantly to the sharp fall and unusually low level of its fertility. In view of the results, we argue that an options based theory is perhaps a richer analytical paradigm for a discussion of fertility decisions in a rapidly changing environment than the traditional Beckerian theory.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1746.pdf

B. "School Progression and the Grade Distribution of Students: Evidence from the Current Population Survey," by Elizabeth U. Cascio (Discussion Paper No. 1747, September 2005, .pdf format, 23p.).

Abstract:

Education researchers have long made inferences about grade retention from the grade distribution of same-aged students. Recent economics studies have followed suit. This paper examines the validity of the "below grade" proxy for retention using data from supplemental questionnaires administered in the U.S. Current Population Survey during the 1990s. I estimate that 21% of non-repeaters are below grade, while 12% of repeaters are not. Misclassification attenuates regression coefficients by 35% when the proxy is an outcome and by 65% when it is a regressor. The latter figure is a benchmark, as classification and regression errors are arguably correlated. Biases are likely substantial in other surveys and time periods.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1747.pdf

C. "Trends of School Effects on Student Achievement: Evidence from NLS:72, HSB:82, and NELS:92," by Spyros Konstantopoulos (Discussion Paper No. 1749, September 2005, .pdf format, 50p.).

Abstract:

The impact of schools on student achievement has been of great interest for the last four decades. This study examines trends of school effects on student achievement employing three national probability samples of high school seniors: NLS:72, HSB:82, and NELS:92. Hierarchical linear models are used to investigate school effects. The findings reveal that the substantial proportion of the variation in student achievement lies within schools not between schools. There is also considerable between school variation in achievement, which becomes larger over time. Schools are more diverse and more segregated in the 1990s than in the 1970s. In addition, school characteristics such as school region, school SES, and certain characteristics of the student body of the school, such as students' daily attendance, students in college preparatory classes, and high school graduates enrolled in colleges are important predictors of average student achievement. The school predictors explained consistently more than 50% of the variation in average student achievement across surveys. We also find considerable teacher heterogeneity in achievement within schools, which suggests important teacher effects on student achievement. Teacher heterogeneity in student achievement was larger than school heterogeneity, which may indicate that teacher effects have a relatively larger impact on mathematics and science student achievement than school effects.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1749.pdf
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Luxembourg Income Study: The following working papers have recently been added to the working paper web site at LIS. Links to abstracts and full text can be found at:

http://www.lisproject.org/publications/wpapersi.htm

No. 415. Did the dual-earner model become stronger or weaker in Finland and Sweden in the 1990s?, by Anita Haataja and Anita Nyberg, August 2005.

No. 414. The Determinants of the Prevalence of Single Mothers: A Cross-Country Analysis, by Libertad Gonzalez, July 2005.

No. 413. Income Guarantees and the Equity-Efficiency Tradeoff , by Steven Pressman, July 2005.

No. 412. Unemployment Versus Inactivity: An Analysis of the Earnings and Labor Force Status of Prime Age Men in France, the UK, and the US at the End of the 20th Century, by Alena Bicakova, June 2005.

No. 411. Why Immigrants Manage to Grab More Social Benefits? Empirical Cross - Country Analysis, by Lubomira Anastassova and Teodora Paligorova, June 2005.

No. 410. How Social Security Keeps Older Persons Out of Poverty across Developed Countries, by Kebin Wu, May 2005.
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Academy for Migration Studies in Denmark [Alborg University, Denmark]: " Religion, Immigrants and Integration," by Tuomas Martikainen (AMID Working Paper Series 43/2005, 2005, .pdf format, 14p.).

http://www.amid.dk/pub/papers/AMID_43-2005_Martikainen.pdf

More information about AMSD:

http://www.amid.dk/
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Equal Opportunities Commission [UK]: "Promoting Gender Equality in Transport," by Kerry Hamilton, Linda Jenkins, Frances Hodgson, and Jeff Turner (Working Paper Series No. 34, Summer 2005, .pdf format, 83p.).

http://www.eoc.org.uk/PDF/wp_34_gender_equality_in_transport.pdf

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "advanced search"
C. Type in your publication name and click "Exact title" radio button
D. Under "Show", click the "fax/ariel" radio button.
E. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

American Journal of Public Health (Vol. 95, Supp./1, 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

Journal of Human Resources (vol. 40 no. 3, 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.
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Other Journals:

American Journal of Epidemiology (Vol. 162, No. 7, Oct. 1, 2005).

http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol162/issue7/index.dtl?etoc

Journal of Sociology (Vol. 41, No. 3, September 2005).

http://jos.sagepub.com/content/vol41/issue3/?etoc

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CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS:

East-West Center: "37th Summer Seminar on Population," will be held May 30, 2006-June 29, 2006. The deadline for application is December 31, 2005. For more information about the three workshops, as well as application materials (.pdf format), go to:

http://www.eastwestcenter.org/events-ce-detail.asp?conf_ID=563
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"International Conference on Space and Time in Historical Demographic Studies: New Methods and Models," Call for Papers: The seminar, organized by the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP), the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research, and the Minnesota Population Center, will take place either in Ann Arbor, Michigan or Minneapolis, Minnesota on October 30 - November 1, 2006. The IUSSP Scientific Committee on Historical Demography invites researchers in the field to submit a 200-word abstract and curriculum vitae before September 30, 2005, to Myron Gutmann (gutmann@umich.edu), with a copy to Bree Gunter (bgunter@icpsr.umich.edu). For more information, see (.pdf format, 2p.):

http://www.iussp.org/Activities/scc-his2/histspaceandtiime.pdf

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DATA:

Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): My Exposure to Violence (Primary Caregiver), Wave 2, 1997-2000 (#13618)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/13618.xml

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): My Child's Exposure to Violence, Wave 2, 1997-2000 (#13619)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/13619.xml

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Generalized Anxiety Disorder (Primary Caregiver), Wave 2, 1997-2000 (#13624)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/13624.xml

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Major Depressive Disorder (Primary Caregiver), Wave 2, 1997-2000 (#13636)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/13636.xml

Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Oppositional Defiance Disorder (Subject), Wave 2, 1997-2000 (#13641)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/13641.xml
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UK Data Archive (Essex University, Colchester, UK): The UK Data Archive has recently added the following dataset to its holdings. Note: There may be charges or licensing requirements on holdings of the UK Data Archive. For more information see:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/

National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles II, 2000-2001 (SN 5223)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5223

Annual Population Survey, 2004: Special Licence Access (SN 5220)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5220

Note: For more information on APS, and the differences between the Special Licence Access and the less restrictive version of the data see:

http://www.esds.ac.uk/government/aps/index.asp

Employment and the Family: Great Britain, Czech Republic,Finland, France, Hungary, Norway and Portugal, 2002 (SN 5229)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5229

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WEBSITES OF INTEREST:

Social Science Resource Council: "Understanding Katrina: Perspectives from the Social Sciences." "As analyses and 'spin' of the Katrina crisis grow, we confront the sort of public issue to which a social science response is urgently needed. Accordingly, the SSRC has organized this web forum addressing the implications of the tragedy that extend beyond "natural disaster," "engineering failures," "cronyism" or other categories of interpretation that do not directly examine the underlying issues-political, social and economic-laid bare by the events surrounding Katrina." The site contains several essays on various aspects of the topic. New essays will be added as they are published.

http://understandingkatrina.ssrc.org/

More information on SSRC:

http://www.ssrc.org/ssrc_mission.page
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Kaiser Family Foundation statehealthfacts.org: Kaiser has recently updated this website. The following tables have been added:

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) HIV/AIDS Funding, FY2004

Office of Minority Health (OMH) HIV/AIDS Funding, FY2004

Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) Program Funding, FY2004

Small Group Health Insurance Market Rate Restrictions, 2005

Small Group Health Insurance Market Guaranteed Issue, 2005

Small Group Health Insurance Market Pre-Existing Condition Periods, 2005

Individual Market Guaranteed Issue (Not Applicable to HIPAA Eligible Individuals), 2005

Individual Market Pre-Exclusion Rules (Not Applicable to HIPAA Eligible Individuals), 2005

Non-Group Coverage Rules for HIPAA Eligible Individuals, 2005

And the following items have been updated:

Median Household Yearly Income, 2002-2004

Current Monthly Medicaid Enrollment, June 2004

SCHIP Program Type

Percent Change in SCHIP Enrollment, December 2003-December 2004

Unemployment Rate (Seasonally Adjusted), 2005 Compared to 2004

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) HIV/AIDS Funding, FY2004

http://statehealthfacts.org/cgi-bin/healthfacts.cgi?action=whatsnew

See Sep. 2, 2005 through Sep. 16, 2005 items.

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu