Study Description

Catasto Study: Census and Property Survey for Florentine Domains and the City of Verona in Fifteenth Century Italy

Principal Investigators:
David Herlihy, Department of History, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Christiane Klapishe-Zuber, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Paris, France

Cataloging-In-Source

Machine-readable data file plus codebook

Herlihy, David and Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane. Census and property survey of Florentine domains and the city of Verona in fifteenth century Italy [machine- readable data file] / principal investigators, David Herlihy and Christiane Klapisch-Zuber. --Darcy ed. / reformatted by Robert Darcy -- Madison, Wis. : Data and Information Services Center [distributor], 1981 and 1996.

31 data files + 2 location code files + 2 program files + 1 codebook (p.90).

Summary: The data were coded during 1966 to 1976 from the official manuscripts of the tax declarations (Campioni) in the fifteenth century Italy. For each household, one person was assigned as the 'fiscal head', the individual primarily responsible for the tax. Data for each household include name of fiscal head, type of dwelling, animal ownership, occupation of fiscal head, value of public and private investments, deductions, and tax. This data set is also known as Catasto study.

Archival study number: AG-504-001.

1. Florence (Italy)--Social conditions. 2. Florence (Italy)--Economic conditions. 3. Florence (Italy)--Census, 1427. I. title. II. Catasto study. III.Klapisch-Zuber,Christiane.

Printed Codebook Only

Census and property survey of Florentine domains and the city of Verona in fifteenth century Italy: a user's guide to the machine-readable data file / principal investigators, David Herlihy and Christiane Klapisch-Zuber. --DPLS ed.-- Madison, Wis. : Data and Program Library Service, 1981. 1 v. ca. 90 p.

This codebook is to be used in conjunction with machine-readable data collection with the same title. It documents data locations, variable description and code values.

I. Herlihy, David II.Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane III. Catasto Study IV. title.

Bibliographic Citation

Users of these data are requested to cite them properly. Below is an example of the proper citation of this work. Please consult a proper style manual and modify the example to maintain consistency in punctuation and typeface.

Herlihy, David and Christiane Klapisch-Zuber. Census and property survey of Florentine domains and the city of Verona in the fifteenth century ltaly [machine- readable data file]. Cambridge, Mass.: David Herlihy, Harvard University, Department of History and Paris, France: Christiane Klapisch-Zuber, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes [producers], 1977. Madison, Wis.: University of Wisconsin, Data and Information Services Center [distributor], 1988 and 1996.; <http://www.disc.wisc.edu/archive/catasto/index.html>; ().

Documentation

Online Codebook (PDF, 3.5Mb)

Introduction

The data were coded, during 1966 to 1976, from the official manuscripts of the tax declarations (Campioni) for the city of Florence and environs (Florentine domains) from 1427 to 1429, the 10% samples of the declarations for Florence in 1458 and 1480 and for the city of Verona in 1425 and 1502. Parts of the 1425 survey have been lost. Therefore, the data set includes only those households and parishes for which records have survived. The survey of 1502 is also incomplete as it includes only those parishes which are included in the earlier survey.

The survey consists of data on the fiscal household as defined by the government for the purpose of collecting the tax. For each household, the survey assigns one person as the 'fiscal head', the individual primarily responsible for collecting the tax. Data for the entire household include: name of fiscal head, type of dwelling, animal ownership, occupation of fiscal head, value of public and private investments, deductions, possessions, members, final assessments and tax. Data on individual members include: age, sex, matrimonial state, relationship to fiscal head, and commentary.

The file is hierarchical with two record types. Each record has 6 cards and each card is 80 characters long. The first record type is an economic record which provides data on the entire household. All households have one. The second record type is a demographic record listing information on individual members of the household. There can be more than one demographic record (O to 5) per household depending on the number of members in the household. The number of observations varies with each series (see Appendix F for the nubmer of observations for each series). Consistency and edit checks have been carried out for all variables.

There are no restrictions on access to the public use files. Also available is:

  1. Data on the Diocese of Florence (no edit checks have been performed).
    [These data are bundled with the Catasto data in a file called ECCLISI.DAT and are therefore downloaded with the Catasto data files. The corresponding documentation is available to download at the same web site as the Catasto documentation, but is not bundled with the Catasto documentation. An online codebook for the Diocese of Florence data is available for browsing.]

Errata

January 2010
For series 99 (NEWCAT29), duplicate Household IDs (column 3-6) are found in records 379, 1762 and 1782. The duplicate cases are likely to be Household ID 380, 1763 and 1783 respectively. These six households (379, 380, 1762, 1763, 1782 and 1783) do not have 5 demographic cards in their records. DISC staff added the correct number of demographic cards to each of these cases to make their file structure consistent with the other records in NEWCAT29. There are 1920 cases in series 99 (NEWCAT29).

In addition, a user informed us that column 12 (the first column for variable, Name of Head of Family) is coded with a number instead of a character in the duplicate cases 379, 1762 and 1782. We checked the file and confirmed these coding anomalies. Because DISC has no access to the original manuscript that David Herlihy and Christiane Klapische-Zuber used to code these records, we cannot verify the codes in household ID and column 12 on these cases. Data users should take note of these three sets of duplicate cases and the anomaly in column 12.

List of Publications

Note: The publications listed below are not part of the DISC collection.

Emigh, Rebecca Jean. The Undevelopment of Capitalism: Sectors and Markets in Fifteenth-Century Tuscany. Temple University Press, 2009.

Emigh, Rebecca Jean. "What Influences Official Information? Exploring Aggregate Microhistories of the Catasto of 1427.” 199-223 in Small Worlds: Method, Meaning, and Narrative in Microhistory, edited by James F. Brooks, Christopher R. N. DeCorse, and John Walton. Santa Fe, NM: School for Advanced Research Press, 2008.

Emigh, Rebecca Jean. "Economic Interests and Sectoral Relations: The Undevelopment of Capitalism in Fifteenth-Century Tuscany." American Journal of Sociology 108 (5): 1075-1113, 2003.

Emigh, Rebecca Jean. "Property Devolution in Tuscany." The Journal of Interdisciplinary History XXXIII (3): 385-420, 2003.

Emigh, Rebecca Jean. "Theorizing Strategies: Households and Markets in Fifteenth-Century Tuscany." The History of the Family 6:495-571, 2001.

Emigh, Rebecca Jean. "The Gender Division of Labor: The Case of Tuscan Smallholders." Continuity and Change 15 (1): 117-137, 2000.

Emigh, Rebecca Jean. "Forms of Property Rights or Class Capacities? The Example of Tuscan Sharecropping." Archives Europeennes de Sociologie (The European Journal of Sociology) 41 (1): 22-52, 2000.

Hopcroft, Rosemary L. and Rebecca Jean Emigh. "Divergent Paths of Agrarian Change: Eastern England and Tuscany Compared." The Journal of European Economic History 29 (1): 9-51, 2000.

Emigh, Rebecca Jean. "Means and Measures: Property Rights, Political Economy, and Productivity in Fifteenth-Century Tuscany." Social Forces 78 (2): 461-490, 1999.

Emigh, Rebecca Jean. "The Length of Leases: Short-Term Contracts and Long-Term Relationships." Viator 30:345-382, 1999.

Emigh, Rebecca Jean. "Traces of Certainty: Recording Death and Taxes in Fifteenth-Century Tuscany." The Journal of Interdisciplinary History XXX (II, Autumn): 181-198, 1999.

Emigh, Rebecca Jean. "Labor Use and Landlord Control: Sharecropping and Household Structure in Fifteenth-Century Tuscany." Journal of Historical Sociology, Vol. 11, No. 1: 37-73,1998.

Emigh, Rebecca Jean.  "Land Tenure, Household Structure, and Fertility: Aggregate Analysis of Fifteenth-Century Rural Tuscan Communities." International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Vol. 17, No. 7/8: 220-255, 1997.

Emigh, Rebecca Jean.  "The Mystery of the Missing Middle-Tenants: The 'Negative' Case of Fixed-Term Leasing and Agricultural Investment in Fifteenth-Century Tuscany." Theory and Society, Vol. 27: 351-375, 1998.

Herlihy, David and Christiane Klapisch-Zuber, Tuscans and Their Families: A Study of the Florentine Catasto of 1427, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985.

Other publications relating to Florentine Catasto of 1427

Botticini, M. "A loveless economy? Intergenerational altruism and the marriage market in a Tuscan town, 1415-1436." Journal of Economic History, Vol. 59, No. 1: 18, 1999.

Emigh, Rebecca Jean. "The Racialization and Feminization of Poverty During the Market Transition in Central and Southern Europe." EUI working paper, RSC; no. 99/10, San Domenico, Italy: European University Institute, 1999 [D1060 E761 -- Memorial Library, University of Wisconsin-Madison].

Emigh, Rebecca Jean. "Loans and Livestock: comparing landlords' and tenants' declarations from the Catasto of 1427." Journal of European Economic History, Vol. 25, No. 3: 705-23, 1996.

Kaplish, Christine, "A Correspondence Analysis of a XVth Century Census: the Florentine Catasto of 1427." The Journal of European Economic History, Vol. 4, No. 2: 415-428, 1975.

Molho, Anthony, "Deception and Marriage Strategy in Renaissance Florence: the case of women's ages." Renaissance Quarterly, Vol, 41, No. 2: 193-217, 1988.  

Herlihy, David and Christiane Klapisch-Zuber, Tuscans and Their Families: A Study of the Florentine Catasto of 1427, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985.

Notes on the Darcy Edition of the Catasto Study

The original Catasto public use file consists of one economic card describing each household (the unit of analysis) followed by one, two, three, four, five, or no demographic cards pertaining to individuals in the household. Because standard analysis packages such as SAS or SPSS require each case to have the same format, the original Catasto public use file was awkward to work with. Thus Dr. Robert Darcy in the Department of Political Science in the Oklahoma State University wrote a program to correct certain extant errors and pad household with as many blank records as necessary to ensure each has five demographic cards. No records were deleted. There were 2 types of corrections. The first correction was where the sequence of demographic cards was out of order; in which case they were put in the correct order. The second correction was where the number of demographic cards per household, i.e. column 8 of the demographic cards, did not correspond with the actual data. The corrections were made to reflect the actual number of demographic cards per household.

An SPSS setup was prepared which defines the 279 variables in the new data et and label each appropriately. DPLS is distributing the DARCY edition of Catasto study. There are 31 data files which are the reformatted Catasto and correspond to the 31 files in the original public use data set.

The CATASTO.SPSS is a SPSS setup file. It includes the job control language necessary to run analysis. Users should list and output this file. It can be modified to suit the requirements of the user's installation. The SPSS setup defines variables for the household (Vl to V29) and for each of 50 possible household members (V30 to V279). The SPSS setup serves as the documentation to the reformatted Catasto.

The CATASTO.PRG contains the PL/I program used to reformat and correct the original public use file. The file contains the job control language necessary to run the program at Oklahoma State University. It, too, can be listed, output, and modified to suit the requirements of the user's installation.

{If you have further question regarding the reformatted data set please contact Robert Darcy at the Department of Political Science, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, (405) 744-5641, e-mail bdarcy@okstate.edu.}

Reference:

J. Paul Bischoff and Robert Darcy, "Reformatting the Florentine Catasto for use by Standard Statistical Analysis Programs," Computers and Medieval Data Processing, XI, (October, 1981):5-6.

Acknowledgement of Donation

This editon of the census and property survey of Florentine domains and the city of Verona in fifteenth century Italy has been deposited at the Data & Information Services Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison for public distribution by David Herlihy, Department History, Harvard University and Christiane Klapisch-Zuber, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Paris, France. Funding support for preparing the original data and this public use edition was provided to Professor Herlihy and Madam Klapisch-Zuber by the following agencies: the American Council of Learned Societies, the Centre National de la Rescherche Scinetifique (CNRS), the Graduate Research Committee, University of Wisconsin-Madison, the National Science Foundation (Grant No. GS-36723) and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University.

Acknowledgement of Assistance

All manuscripts utilizing data made available through the Data & Information Services Center (DISC) should acknowledge that fact as well as cite the title of the study as indicated on the title page and sample catalog statement and identify the original collectors of the data. All users of these data are urged to follow some adaptation of this statement with the parentheses indicating items to be completed or deleted appropriated by the individual analyst.

The data (and tabulations) utilized in this publication were made available (in part) by the Data & Information Services Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The data for the Census and Property Survey of Florentine Domains and the City of Verona in Fifteenth Century Italy were prepared by David Herlihy, Department of History, Harvard University and Christiane Klapisch-Zuber, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Paris, France. Neither the principal investigators nor Data & Information Services Center bear any responsibility for the analysis or interpretations presented here.

In order to provide funding agencies with essential information about the use of archival resources and to facilitate the exchange of information about DISC participants' research activities, each user of these facilities is requested to send two copies of each completed manuscript, thesis abstract, or reprint to the Data & Information Services Center.