Study Description

Socioeconomic Role of Nicaraguan Women, 1977-1978

Abstract

Unique Identification Number:
QN-501-001-1-1-NIC-DPLS-1978
 
Type of File:
Numeric.
 
Methodology:
This study consists of interviews with 4,104 women between the ages of 15 and 45 living in Nicaragua. A stratified random sampling technique was used to collect 3,409 of the interviews; the other 695 interviews are of sisters of the original respondents. The interviewing was done in three phases, or waves, using different survey instruments. Wave I interviews were conducted during the summer of 1977 of 1,294 women residing in Managua. Households were selected randomly within certain neighborhoods chosen via areal stratification. Once in a household, the woman interviewed was randomly selected from among women 15 to 45 years old, excluding nonworking students. Wave II consists of 2,080 interviews with women residing in small towns and in cities other than Managua, and were conducted during the winter and spring of 1978. Of these, 1,671 women were again randomly chosen from the households of a selected neighborhood or block. The other 409 women are sisters of the Wave I sample. Wave III interviewing was done in the rural areas during the summer and fall of 1978. During this time of intense political and social unrest, 730 interviews were collected before interviewing was stopped. Of these, 79 were randomly selected respondents, and 255 were sisters of women previously interviewed; the remaining 396 lived in households where agrarian activity provided the major source of family income, of these, 365 were randomly selected and 31 were sisters.
 
Summary:
The interviews acquired current and retrospective information in four general areas: economic activity of the respondent and other members of the household; fertility and contraceptive behavior; health and nutritional status of family members and use of medical facilities; and, other background variables such as marital and migratory status, education, attitudes and intensity of religious observance of the family, the parents of the respondent and her spouse or male companion.
 
Geographic Coverage:
Nicaragua
 
Descriptors:
health, nutrition, contraceptive knowledge, education, fertility, family and personal characteristics, economic activity, migration
 
Technical Notes:
The public use file consists of 4,104 records that are 4,560 characters in length. Interviewing was done in three phases, or waves, using different survey instruments. The data from all three waves were originally stored in seven different files. The files were later appended together; however, knowledge of the original file number is essential to reading the codebook and interpreting the data (file number is recorded in variable 2 of the data file). The data have been stored in F6 format, meaning that every variable takes up six characters, values are right-justified and padded with blanks. Users should note that the codebook does not contain the actual locations of variables, but that the variables number must be used to determine location (e.g. variable 1 occupies columns 1 through 6, variable 2 occupies columns 7 through 12, and so on).
 
Cited References:
Socioeconomic Characteristics of Women in a Developing Country and the Degree of Urbanization by Jere R. Behrman, et al. Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Paper 655-81. Madison, Wisc.: University of Wisconsin, Institute for Research on Poverty, 1980.

Acknowledgement of Donation

This edition of the Socioeconomic Role of Nicaraguan Women, 1977-1978 has been deposited at the Data and Information Services Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison for distribution by Barbara L. Wolfe, University of Wisconsin, Departments of Economics and Preventive Medicine, and Institute for Research on Poverty. This research was supported by the Population and Development Policy Research Program sponsored jointly by the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations. Additional support was provided by the Agency for International Development contract AID/otr-c-1571.

Acknowledgement of Assistance

All manuscripts utilizing data made available through the Data and Information Services Center should acknowledge that fact as well as cite the title of the study as indicated on the title page and sample catalog statement and identify the original collector(s) of the data. All users of these data are urged to follow some adaptation of this statement with the parentheses indicating items to be completed or deleted appropriately by the individual analyst.

The data (and tabulations) utilized in this publication were made available (in part) by the Data and Program Library Service, University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Socioeconomic Role of Nicaraguan Women, 1977-1978 was produced by Barbara L. Wolfe, et al., and is distributed by the Data and Information Services Center (DISC). The research was supported by the Population and Development Policy Research Program sponsored jointly by the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations, and the Agency for International Development. Neither the principal investigators, the funding agencies, nor the Data and Information Services Center bears any responsibility for the analyses or interpretations presented here.

Note to Users of the Codebooks

The public use file consists of 4,104 records that are 4,560 characters in length. Interviewing was done in three phases, or waves, using different survey instruments. The data from all three waves were originally stored in seven different files. The files were later appended together; however, knowledge of the original file number is essential to reading the codebook and interpreting the data (file number is recorded in variable 2 of the data file). The data have been stored in F6 format, meaning that every variable takes up six characters, values are right-justified and padded with blanks. Users should note that the codebook does not contain the actual locations of variables, but that the variables number must be used to determine location (e.g. variable 1 occupies columns 1 through 6, variable 2 occupies columns 7 through 12, and so on). While this is a rectangular data set, and each record has 760 variables, the three waves differ from each other in length. Wave I has 700 variables, Wave II has 500 variables, and Wave III has 760 variables. At the end of records for Waves I and II, a zero is stored in the data when a particular variables is not applicable to the record (e.g., Variables 701 through 760 for Wave I contain zeros). The user is urged to carefully examine all documentation.

General Description of the Data (PDF, 203 Kb)